BUSINESS & POLITICS IN THE WORLD

 

GLOBAL OPINION REPORT NO. 692

 

 

Week: May 24 –May 30, 2021

 

Presentation: June 04, 2021

 

 

Contents

 

692-43-24/Commentary: Eight In Ten (80%) Singaporeans Have Bought Shopped Online In The Past Three Months  3

SUMMARY OF POLLS. 5

Eight in ten (80%) Singaporeans have bought shopped online in the past three months, trailing behind 85% who have shopped in-store. Clothing is the item people most prefer to purchase in-store. A third (33%) say adhering to social distancing measures is a barrier to shopping at brick & mortar stores. The main motivation for online shopping is doorstep home delivery. 6

ASIA   12

India Has A High Interest In Adopting AR/VR Solutions For Clothes (67%) And Technology/Home Appliances (56%) 12

Eight In Ten (80%) Singaporeans Have Bought Shopped Online In The Past Three Months. 14

AFRICA.. 17

77% Zambians Are Of The View That The Country Is Going In Wrong Direction. 18

A Growing Number Of Gambians Feel Unsafe Walking In Their Neighborhoods (47%) And Fear Crime In Their Homes (36%) 19

WEST EUROPE.. 19

Three In Ten (28%) Britons Say Issue Of Racism And Inequality Has Been Discussed Too Much. 19

A Third Of UK Adults Say Their Hunch Or Feel Is The Most Important Factor When Deciding How To Bet (35%) During Gambling  21

Two-Fifths (42%) Of The GB Population Has Investable Assets. 24

Among The Football Clubs In UK Leicester City Is At Peak With 28.7 Points In May. 28

Two In Five (39%) Britons Say They Do Not Intend To Switch An Insurance Policy In The Next 12 Months. 30

One In Four Germans Can Imagine Buying A Self-Driving Car 31

A Majority Of French Students Say They Have Little Confidence In The Future (54%) 32

27% Of Spaniards Affirm That The Management Was "Very Bad" Regarding The Diplomatic Relations Between The Monarchy Of Morocco And The Government Of Spain. 34

NORTH AMERICA.. 35

More Than Nine-In-Ten (95%) Foreign Policy Scholars And American Public Agree That U.S. Standing Abroad Is Important 35

In Both Parties, Fewer Now Say Being Christian Or Being Born In U.S. Is Important To Being Truly American. 38

Twenty-Four Percent Of Black And Hispanic Employees Reported Experiencing Discrimination At Work In The Past 12 Months  41

Home Buying Intentions in Ontario Hold Steady (19%), With Likely Buyers Anticipating Paying 12% More for a Home in the Next Year 44

Nearly All Canadians (93%) Agree Everyone Must Do Their Part To Make Roads Safe. 49

AUSTRALIA.. 50

Overall Satisfaction With ‘Big 4’ Banks Is Higher Than A Year Ago With CBA & NAB The Top Two. 50

New Zealand Labour-Led Government Leads Opposition By 17% In May: 56% cf. 39%... 52

MULTICOUNTRY STUDIES. 57

Is Covid-19 Compelling Arab Citizens To Surrender Freedoms To Their Governments. 57

More Than Four In Every 10 (43%) Respondents Reported That Covid-19 Had Made It More Difficult For Them Or Someone In Their Household To Obtain Required Medication In The Previous Three Months. 63

Two In Five Drivers Based In The UAE, In Great Britain (5%) And Germany, (9%) Plan To Buy A New Car In The Next 12 Months  67

Globally (54%) Still Prefer In-Store Shopping To Online Purchases (38%) 69

 


 

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

 

This weekly report consists of twenty three surveys. The report includes four multi-country studies from different states across the globe.

 

692-43-24/Commentary: Eight In Ten (80%) Singaporeans Have Bought Shopped Online In The Past Three Months

  • Eight in ten (80%) Singaporeans have bought shopped online in the past three months, trailing behind 85% who have shopped in-store
  • Clothing is the item people most prefer to purchase in-store
  • A third (33%) say adhering to social distancing measures is a barrier to shopping at brick & mortar stores
  • The main motivation for online shopping is doorstep home delivery

COVID-19 has had a profound impact on shopping attitudes and behaviours globally. While shopping has shifted online during the pandemic, consumer preference for brick-and-mortar remains high. YouGov’s latest whitepaper ‘​International Omni-Channel Retail Report 2021: Shopping in the pandemic and the implications for the future’ looks at shopping behaviours amongst Singaporeans to understand the cross-channel interplay between online and brick-and-mortar outlets, as well as motivations and barriers between these two types of retailers.

Over eight in ten (85%) Singaporeans have purchased something from a brick & mortar store in the past three months. Brick-and-mortar appears to be the go-to method for purchasing everyday essential items, such as household food & drink (55%), personal care items (41%), household cleaning supplies (37%) and medicine (30%). Clothing (33%) is the only discretionary item in the top five most purchased things in-store.

https://docs.cdn.yougov.com/e37hppdn6d/SG%20retail%201.png

Online shopping lags behind in-store shopping, with eight in ten (80%) buying something online in the past three months. Conversely, online retail channels are the preferred channel for discretionary items such as clothing (39%), footwear (19%) and furniture / home décor (14%). Everyday items unsurprisingly are the most purchased items in both categories. Two in five (39%) have stocked up on household food & drink online in the past 90 days. Very few consumers shop exclusively at one channel or retailer – four in five (80%) shop both online and in-store, 13% shop entirely in-store and 7% shop entirely online.

Despite the growth of online retail, there are still many shoppers that want to buy through brick-and-mortar outlets. YouGov asked Singaporean consumers about channel preferences for one specific and exceptionally large category—clothing. We then compared their actual shopping behaviour for clothing with what they wanted to do, to see how actions compared to desires. When asked which category shoppers most would prefer to buy in person, clothing came up on top (43%), followed by footwear (40%). However, when compared to the data that shows only a third (33%) have bought clothing from a brick & mortar store in the past three months, this suggests an optimism for brick & mortar stores looking forward –  that after the pandemic ends consumers will return to the shopping channel they prefer.

https://docs.cdn.yougov.com/tl3ufc4woe/SG%20retail%202.png

This belief that shoppers will return to in-person shopping could be supported by looking at the barriers Singaporean consumers say are keeping them from shopping in-store. A third (33%) selected ‘adhering to social distancing guidance and / or avoiding public interactions’ as a reason for being dissuaded from buying things in-store. The main barriers according to consumers however are the lack of offers / discounts and the inconvenience of visiting a physical store (both 46%), followed by accessibility (30%), lack of physical stores in their vicinity (27%), lack of product selection / variety (25%) and parking (23%). For those over the age of 55, almost a third (31%) say having to find parking is a reason stopping them from shopping in-store.

The top motivations for people to visit a brick & mortar store are in-line with data showing higher preference to buy clothing in-person versus online, which are being able to physically experience a product (65%) and the ability try things in store (59%). Other motivations are speed of purchase (43%) and finding it easier (39%). Three in ten (30%) also say they trust physical stores more than online stores.https://docs.cdn.yougov.com/rlqihxy7wl/sg%20retail%203.png

This lack of trust for online retailers is also reflected in the barriers identified by Singaporeans in shopping online. Almost two in five (38%) have concerns about personal information and data security. Amongst those over the age of 45, this jumps to 45%. Other reasons why one might not be keen to purchase from an online retailer is the delivery charges (55%), the inability to physically experience the product (51%) and product return policy (45%).

There are however, plenty of incentives to shop online, such as home delivery (63%), promotional offers (59%), variety of products available (39%) and product details & descriptions (34%). About half (46%) also say it is easier to purchase things online, and amongst those aged 18 to 34, this jumps to three in five (59%).

(YouGov Singapore)

May 27, 2021

Source: https://sg.yougov.com/en-sg/news/2021/05/27/brick-mortar-remains-strong-amidst-pandemic/

 

SUMMARY OF POLLS

ASIA

(India)

India Has A High Interest In Adopting AR/VR Solutions For Clothes (67%) And Technology/Home Appliances (56%)

India, specifically, has a high interest in adopting AR/VR solutions for clothes (67%) and technology/home appliances (56%). This indicates that the future of augmented shopping in India looks bright and by adopting these technologies online retailers can drive greater channel penetration. Looking at the general shopping habits around the globe, we see that brick-and-motor and online channels are pervasive among shoppers globally, with an average penetration of 86% and 81%, respectively.

(YouGov India)
May 25, 2021

 

(Singapore)

Eight In Ten (80%) Singaporeans Have Bought Shopped Online In The Past Three Months

Eight in ten (80%) Singaporeans have bought shopped online in the past three months, trailing behind 85% who have shopped in-store. Clothing is the item people most prefer to purchase in-store. A third (33%) say adhering to social distancing measures is a barrier to shopping at brick & mortar stores. The main motivation for online shopping is doorstep home delivery

(YouGov Singapore)

May 27, 2021

 

AFRICA

(Zambia)

77% Zambians Are Of The View That The Country Is Going In Wrong Direction

A majority of Zambians are pessimistic about the country’s direction and dissatisfied with the way their democracy is working, a new Afrobarometer survey shows. Most citizens say the country’s economic condition and their personal living conditions are bad, and the country is headed in the wrong direction. Only about one-third expect things to get better during the coming year.

(Afrobarometer)

26 May 2021

 

(Gambia)

A Growing Number Of Gambians Feel Unsafe Walking In Their Neighborhoods (47%) And Fear Crime In Their Homes (36%)

A growing number of Gambians feel unsafe walking in their neighbourhoods and fear crime in their homes, the latest Afrobarometer survey indicates. Over the past three years, citizens’ sense of personal safety has decreased alongside their approval of the government’s efforts to reduce crime. Even so, the Gambia Armed Forces and Police Force remain among the country’s most trusted institutions. And an overwhelming majority of Gambians want the ECOWAS Military Intervention in the Gambia (ECOMIG) to leave to allow Gambia’s military and police to take charge of the security needs of the country.

(Afrobarometer)

28 May 2021

 

WEST EUROPE

(UK)

Three In Ten (28%) Britons Say Issue Of Racism And Inequality Has Been Discussed Too Much

The death of George Floyd on 25th May 2020 sparked a global conversation about racism and inequalities, but one year on British public opinion is split as to whether racism is discussed too much or too little. Three in ten (28%) say it has been discussed too much while 30% say it has been spoken about too little and a third (33%) believe it has been discussed about the right amount. These findings are echoed in our qualitative research with an online community of ethnic minorities, which show that for some the past year has encouraged them to talk about racism more openly whereas others feel much less comfortable talking about it. 

(Ipsos MORI)

25 May 2021

A Third Of UK Adults Say Their Hunch Or Feel Is The Most Important Factor When Deciding How To Bet (35%) During Gambling

As excitement builds around the Euros – which was postponed until June of this year because of the COVID-19 pandemic – our survey shows 18% of UK adults are likely to place money on some aspect of the tournament. Nearly three-quarters (72%) of adults likely to place a bet on the Euros will do so on individual matches, significantly more than the 42% who plan to bet on the championship winner. About one in five punters (22%) plan to put money on an accumulator or parlay, 19% will wager on a group winner and 15% will place in-game wagers. A small proportion will place prop bets (18%), spread bets (4%) or bets on other aspects of the tournament (2%). 

(YouGov UK)

May 25, 2021

Two-Fifths (42%) Of The GB Population Has Investable Assets

The retail investment market has been stifled for some time, with many consumers not willing or lacking the confidence to invest their savings for better long-term growth. However, as we emerge from the global pandemic and consumer confidence returns, many will have the potential to invest and may be tempted to look for better returns than current interest rates can deliver. Understanding consumer attitudes towards investing has never been more important. 

(YouGov UK)

May 25, 2021

Among The Football Clubs In UK Leicester City Is At Peak With 28.7 Points In May

Leicester City witnessed a dramatic surge after lifting the FA Cup with their victory over Chelsea on May 15. The club had a score of 6.4 on May 14 (the only one of our clubs to begin the period with a positive score) and registered daily increments after winning the final, to peak at 28.7 on May 22.  Chelsea will be keen to claim the European title after their loss in the FA Cup final. The club’s Buzz score was on the mend after the ESL episode but has steadily declined to 0.5 after the defeat. A strong performance in the Champions League final could well turn the trend for them.

(YouGov UK)

May 26, 2021

Two In Five (39%) Britons Say They Do Not Intend To Switch An Insurance Policy In The Next 12 Months

Data from YouGov Profiles indicates that, among policyholders of any kind of insurance product, just two in five (39%) say they do not intend to switch a policy in the next 12 months, with 15% saying they don’t know if they plan to change providers or not.  That leaves 46% of policyholders looking to make a change. Of consumers with home/building contents insurance, a similar proportion (36%) want to change insurer in the coming 12 months, while almost a quarter of those with standalone home contents insurance (23%) say the same. 

(YouGov UK)

May 27, 2021

 

(Germany)

One In Four Germans Can Imagine Buying A Self-Driving Car

Between the ages of 18 and 34. This is also the age group most likely to believe that autonomous cars can make road traffic safer and reduce accidents. Most of the prospective buyers, 61 percent, are male. When choosing a car brand, the most important thing for Germans is the price-performance ratio, followed by quality / service life as well as follow-up and maintenance costs. 

(YouGov Germany)

May 25, 2021

 

(France)

A Majority Of French Students Say They Have Little Confidence In The Future (54%) 

The coronavirus crisis was experienced as a real shock for the students of the grandes écoles who experience concerns and difficulties in projecting themselves into the future. Almost two-thirds of them felt they had dropped out during their year of study (63%) and believe that they will have to make concessions for their first job compared to what they had envisaged before the Covid19 (63%). Even more, a majority of students say they have little confidence in the future (54%) and 18% have given up on their professional project and no longer know what to do with regard to their future.

(Ipsos France)

May 27, 2021

 

(Spain)

27% Of Spaniards Affirm That The Management Was "Very Bad" Regarding The Diplomatic Relations Between The Monarchy Of Morocco And The Government Of Spain

The deterioration of diplomatic relations between the Monarchy of Morocco and the Government of Spain caused, on May 17, 2021, the massive crossing of people on the border between both countries. 27% of Spaniards affirm that the management by the Government of Spain was "very bad", compared to 4% of the population that thinks that the actions were "very good". On average, the Government of Spain obtains a 4.32 score out of 10.

(YouGov Spain)

May 26, 2021

 

NORTH AMERICA

(USA)

More Than Nine-In-Ten (95%) Foreign Policy Scholars And American Public Agree That U.S. Standing Abroad Is Important

An overwhelming majority of Americans agree it is important that the United States is generally respected by other countries around the world, according to a Pew Research Center survey conducted in February. And a new parallel survey of international relations scholars finds that academics are in lockstep with the U.S. public on the importance of America’s image abroad. 87% of U.S. adults surveyed say respect for the U.S. abroad is vital, including half who say it is very important. Only 5% and 13% of the IR scholars and American public, respectively, say this is not too or not at all important.

(PEW)

MAY 24, 2021

In Both Parties, Fewer Now Say Being Christian Or Being Born In U.S. Is Important To Being Truly American

The share of Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents who say it is important to be born in the U.S. to be truly American has fallen by half, from 50% in 2016 to just a quarter in 2020. And while majorities of Democrats believe speaking English and sharing U.S. customs and traditions are important for being truly American (65% and 59%, respectively), these shares have also seen a marked decrease since 2016 (from 87% and 79%, respectively).

(PEW)

MAY 25, 2021

Twenty-Four Percent Of Black And Hispanic Employees Reported Experiencing Discrimination At Work In The Past 12 Months

Workplace discrimination doesn't affect everyone equally. Twenty-four percent of Black and Hispanic employees reported experiencing discrimination at work in the past 12 months, as did 15% of White employees and 16% of Asian employees. But 75% of Black employees say that discrimination was related to their race or ethnicity, compared with 61% of Hispanic and 42% of White workers. And the Gallup study finds that discrimination undermines employee wellbeing, more so for Black and Hispanic workers than White ones.

(Gallup USA)

MAY 26, 2021

(Canada)

Home Buying Intentions in Ontario Hold Steady (19%), With Likely Buyers Anticipating Paying 12% More for a Home in the Next Year

Ontario Real Estate Association (OREA) has revealed that home buying intentions unchanged from February 2020, with one in five (19%) Ontario adults say they are likely (6% very/13%somewhat) to buy a home in the next twelve months. Whether a product of the pandemic or changes in their family, one in five (21%) likely homebuyers in Ontario is an “upgrader”, meaning that their main reason for buying was needing a larger home.

(Ipsos Canada)

25 May 2021

Nearly All Canadians (93%) Agree Everyone Must Do Their Part To Make Roads Safe

According to a recent Ipsos study on behalf of Parachute, half or more say they would like to see arrests for impaired driving, police checking for impaired driving, and separate bicycle lanes to be implemented. There is less enthusiasm among reduced speed limits, with only one in five indicating they would like to see this measure in their community.

(Ipsos Canada)

27 May 2021

 

AUSTRALIA

Overall Satisfaction With ‘Big 4’ Banks Is Higher Than A Year Ago With CBA & NAB The Top Two

New data from Roy Morgan shows overall 80.5% of customers are satisfied with their bank(s) in April 2021, an increase of 1.3% points on a year ago when the COVID-19 pandemic began. The increase was built upon increases in satisfaction for building societies (up 3% points on a year ago), foreign banks (up 2.3% points) and Australia’s ‘Big 4’ banks (up 0.3% points). Satisfaction for the four major banks as a group is 77.1%, up 0.3% points on April 2020, and up 0.2% points on January 2021.

(Roy Morgan)

May 25 2021

 

(New Zealand)

New Zealand Labour-Led Government Leads Opposition By 17% In May: 56% cf. 39%

Support for New Zealand’s Labour/Greens government was up 1% point to 56% in May. Support for the Labour Party was up 3.5% points to 45% while support for the Greens dropped 2.5% points to 11%. The governing parties are now 17% points ahead of the Parliamentary opposition National/Act NZ/ Maori Party on 39%, down 2% points since April. Support for National was down 1% point to 28.5% in May, support for Act NZ was unchanged at 9% and Maori Party support dropped by 1% point to 1.5%.

(Roy Morgan)

May 28 2021

MULTICOUNTRY STUDIES

Is Covid-19 Compelling Arab Citizens To Surrender Freedoms To Their Governments

. Two-thirds of Algerians and Moroccans (66 percent in each) say it is either sometimes or always justifiable for the government to limit freedom of speech during a public health emergency, followed by over half of Jordanians (59 percent) and Tunisians (53 percent) saying the same. Only in Lebanon do fewer than half of respondents cite support for such restrictions to free speech (47 percent).

(Arabbarometer)

May 24, 2021

Source: https://www.arabbarometer.org/2021/05/is-covid-19-compelling-arab-citizens-to-surrender-freedoms-to-their-governments/

More Than Four In Every 10 (43%) Respondents Reported That Covid-19 Had Made It More Difficult For Them Or Someone In Their Household To Obtain Required Medication In The Previous Three Months 

More than four in every 10 (43%) respondents reported that Covid-19 had made it more difficult for them or someone in their household to obtain required medication in the previous three months (between November 2020 and February 2021). Among respondents that reported they, or someone in their household required a health care visit, almost a quarter (23%) reported missing or skipping services since November 2020 and more than four in 10 (42%) missed or skipped services since the start of the pandemic.

(Ipsos South Africa)

24 May 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-za/africa-day-african-perspective-covid-19

Two In Five Drivers Based In The UAE, In Great Britain (5%) And Germany, (9%) Plan To Buy A New Car In The Next 12 Months

It’s a similar story when it comes to buying used vehicles. Almost a quarter of the UAE  drivers want to buy a second hand car (23%) in the next 12 months, and nearly as many Australians (19%) say the same. But, again, in Britain (8%) and Germany (7%) demand is much weaker – something which in itself will have a knock-on effect on the proportion of consumers in the market for a model fresh off the production line.

(YouGov UK)

May 27, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/transport/articles-reports/2021/05/27/where-demand-new-cars-strongest-and-how-are-motori

Globally (54%) Still Prefer In-Store Shopping To Online Purchases (38%)

In other markets, though, the in-store experience remains king. In Indonesia, for example, 8% of shoppers have bought a phone in-store, compared to just one in twenty (5%) who have done so in-store. In UAE, the differential is similar – 12% vs. 8%.  Consumers in the US are divided, with the same proportion (9%) having bought online as in-store over the last quarter. Other countries where there is no significant difference between the percentage of adults that chose online vs in-store are Poland, Italy, China, Sweden, France, and Denmark. 

(YouGov UK)

May 28, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/consumer/articles-reports/2021/05/28/place-people-buy-mobile-phones-changing

ASIA

692-43-01/Poll

India Has A High Interest In Adopting AR/VR Solutions For Clothes (67%) And Technology/Home Appliances (56%)

YouGov’s latest global report reveals that India is among the leading countries to show an interest in adopting innovative technologies like AR/VR (Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality) for retail shopping.

YouGov’s ‘International Omni-Channel Retail Report 2021: Shopping in the pandemic and the implications for the future' provides an overview of Covid-19 on shopping attitudes and behaviors across 17 markets.

Data from the whitepaper shows although interest in adopting AR/ VR technology is nascent globally, it varies across categories, with clothes and technology/ home appliances being the top categories to see its adoption in the future.

India, specifically, has a high interest in adopting AR/VR solutions for clothes (67%) and technology/home appliances (56%). This indicates that the future of augmented shopping in India looks bright and by adopting these technologies online retailers can drive greater channel penetration.

Looking at the general shopping habits around the globe, we see that brick-and-motor and online channels are pervasive among shoppers globally, with an average penetration of 86% and 81%, respectively.

Most consumers across all markets shop from both channels. While both channels are well penetrated, consumers’ category needs drive their decision to shop in person or online.

Looking specifically at the shopping behavior of urban Indians in the past three months, we see that brick-and-motor penetration levels are higher for every essential category apart from personal care products. The largest gap is seen in medicines and medical supplies, where penetration is 14 points higher in brick-and-motor channels than online (40% vs 26%), showing a positive sign for retail pharmacies in the country. Food and drinks is yet another essential category that people mostly bought from brick-and-motor channels than online (41% brick-and-motor vs 33% online).

In terms of discretionary items, Clothing (45% online vs 34% brick-and-motor) and Mobile Phones (29% vs 15%) are sectors that showed greater online penetration.

When asked about factors that motivate consumers to buy online, home delivery emerged as the top reason cited by consumers globally, with the highest numbers coming from Mexico (69%) and India (66%).

Most urban Indians claim the ease of purchasing things online and the ability to compare the products (53% and 51% respectively) are also top motivators for them to shop online.

Although online shopping offers convenience, product return policy and the inability to physically experience products were stated as major barriers for this medium in India.

On the other hand, when it comes to stores, the ability to physically experience products was stated as the top reason to shop from stores, with more than half in India (53%) saying this.

Even though this is a huge pull for consumers, factors such as lack of offers (47%) and variety (35%) dissuades them from shopping in stores. The current restrictions and social distancing norms add to the reasons (33%) for shoppers avoiding brick-and-motor stores in the recent past.

Commenting on this, Deepa Bhatia of YouGov India, said, “The pandemic has led to shifts in shopping behavior among consumers across the globe. It is therefore imperative for brands and retailers to be cognisant of these changes and understand the cross-channel interplay between online and offline stores.

As consumers are open to embracing new technologies, retailers need to start devising innovative strategies backed by the latest technological solutions to enhance the shopping experience and drive greater channel penetration.”

(YouGov India)
May 25, 2021

Source: https://in.yougov.com/en-hi/news/2021/05/25/urban-indians-likely-adopt-ar-vr-technology-retail/

 

692-43-02/Poll

Eight In Ten (80%) Singaporeans Have Bought Shopped Online In The Past Three Months

  • Eight in ten (80%) Singaporeans have bought shopped online in the past three months, trailing behind 85% who have shopped in-store
  • Clothing is the item people most prefer to purchase in-store
  • A third (33%) say adhering to social distancing measures is a barrier to shopping at brick & mortar stores
  • The main motivation for online shopping is doorstep home delivery

COVID-19 has had a profound impact on shopping attitudes and behaviours globally. While shopping has shifted online during the pandemic, consumer preference for brick-and-mortar remains high. YouGov’s latest whitepaper ‘​International Omni-Channel Retail Report 2021: Shopping in the pandemic and the implications for the future’ looks at shopping behaviours amongst Singaporeans to understand the cross-channel interplay between online and brick-and-mortar outlets, as well as motivations and barriers between these two types of retailers.

Over eight in ten (85%) Singaporeans have purchased something from a brick & mortar store in the past three months. Brick-and-mortar appears to be the go-to method for purchasing everyday essential items, such as household food & drink (55%), personal care items (41%), household cleaning supplies (37%) and medicine (30%). Clothing (33%) is the only discretionary item in the top five most purchased things in-store.

https://docs.cdn.yougov.com/e37hppdn6d/SG%20retail%201.png

Online shopping lags behind in-store shopping, with eight in ten (80%) buying something online in the past three months. Conversely, online retail channels are the preferred channel for discretionary items such as clothing (39%), footwear (19%) and furniture / home décor (14%). Everyday items unsurprisingly are the most purchased items in both categories. Two in five (39%) have stocked up on household food & drink online in the past 90 days. Very few consumers shop exclusively at one channel or retailer – four in five (80%) shop both online and in-store, 13% shop entirely in-store and 7% shop entirely online.

Despite the growth of online retail, there are still many shoppers that want to buy through brick-and-mortar outlets. YouGov asked Singaporean consumers about channel preferences for one specific and exceptionally large category—clothing. We then compared their actual shopping behaviour for clothing with what they wanted to do, to see how actions compared to desires. When asked which category shoppers most would prefer to buy in person, clothing came up on top (43%), followed by footwear (40%). However, when compared to the data that shows only a third (33%) have bought clothing from a brick & mortar store in the past three months, this suggests an optimism for brick & mortar stores looking forward –  that after the pandemic ends consumers will return to the shopping channel they prefer.

https://docs.cdn.yougov.com/tl3ufc4woe/SG%20retail%202.png

This belief that shoppers will return to in-person shopping could be supported by looking at the barriers Singaporean consumers say are keeping them from shopping in-store. A third (33%) selected ‘adhering to social distancing guidance and / or avoiding public interactions’ as a reason for being dissuaded from buying things in-store. The main barriers according to consumers however are the lack of offers / discounts and the inconvenience of visiting a physical store (both 46%), followed by accessibility (30%), lack of physical stores in their vicinity (27%), lack of product selection / variety (25%) and parking (23%). For those over the age of 55, almost a third (31%) say having to find parking is a reason stopping them from shopping in-store.

The top motivations for people to visit a brick & mortar store are in-line with data showing higher preference to buy clothing in-person versus online, which are being able to physically experience a product (65%) and the ability try things in store (59%). Other motivations are speed of purchase (43%) and finding it easier (39%). Three in ten (30%) also say they trust physical stores more than online stores.https://docs.cdn.yougov.com/rlqihxy7wl/sg%20retail%203.png

This lack of trust for online retailers is also reflected in the barriers identified by Singaporeans in shopping online. Almost two in five (38%) have concerns about personal information and data security. Amongst those over the age of 45, this jumps to 45%. Other reasons why one might not be keen to purchase from an online retailer is the delivery charges (55%), the inability to physically experience the product (51%) and product return policy (45%).

There are however, plenty of incentives to shop online, such as home delivery (63%), promotional offers (59%), variety of products available (39%) and product details & descriptions (34%). About half (46%) also say it is easier to purchase things online, and amongst those aged 18 to 34, this jumps to three in five (59%).

(YouGov Singapore)

May 27, 2021

Source: https://sg.yougov.com/en-sg/news/2021/05/27/brick-mortar-remains-strong-amidst-pandemic/

 

AFRICA

692-43-03/Poll

77% Zambians Are Of The View That The Country Is Going In Wrong Direction

https://afrobarometer.org/sites/default/files/zambia-r8-pr-2_1.png

A majority of Zambians are pessimistic about the country’s direction and dissatisfied with the way their democracy is working, a new Afrobarometer survey shows.

Most citizens say the country’s economic condition and their personal living conditions are bad, and the country is headed in the wrong direction. Only about one-third expect things to get better during the coming year.

Zambians overwhelmingly support democracy and reject authoritarian alternatives. But a majority say they are dissatisfied with the way democracy is working in their country.

These findings are particularly relevant ahead of the country’s upcoming national elections on 12 August 2021.

(Afrobarometer)

26 May 2021

Source: https://afrobarometer.org/press/amidst-gloomy-views-economy-and-countrys-direction-zambians-voice-dissatisfaction-way

 

692-43-04/Poll

A Growing Number Of Gambians Feel Unsafe Walking In Their Neighborhoods (47%) And Fear Crime In Their Homes (36%)

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A growing number of Gambians feel unsafe walking in their neighbourhoods and fear crime in their homes, the latest Afrobarometer survey indicates. Over the past three years, citizens’ sense of personal safety has decreased alongside their approval of the government’s efforts to reduce crime. Even so, the Gambia Armed Forces and Police Force remain among the country’s most trusted institutions. And an overwhelming majority of Gambians want the ECOWAS Military Intervention in the Gambia (ECOMIG) to leave to allow Gambia’s military and police to take charge of the security needs of the country. ECOMIG, which has been charged with security in the country since the political impasse of 2017, continues to operate under a mandate ending in December 2021. There are also discussions of transforming the mission into a policing force. In response to perceptions of an upsurge in crime, the Gambia Police Force has launched a high-visibility patrol dubbed Operation Zero Crime. In a recent address to the nation, President Adama Barrow acknowledged increasing crime and assured citizens that he would boost the capacity of the Gambia Police Force in order to respond effectively. The Gambia is also implementing a security sector reform program to move away from politicized security institutions common under the previous regime.

(Afrobarometer)

28 May 2021

Source: https://afrobarometer.org/press/gambians-feel-less-safe-want-ecomig-leave-afrobarometer-survey-shows

 

WEST EUROPE

692-43-05/Poll

Three In Ten (28%) Britons Say Issue Of Racism And Inequality Has Been Discussed Too Much

  • Britons are split over the attention paid to racism over the last year: three in ten think it has been discussed too much, and three in ten too little.
  • A majority say more needs to be done to tackle racism
  • Black African people and Gypsies, Roma and Travellers are seen as those treated most unfairly by society 

Is racism discussed enough?

The death of George Floyd on 25th May 2020 sparked a global conversation about racism and inequalities, but one year on British public opinion is split as to whether racism is discussed too much or too little. Three in ten (28%) say it has been discussed too much while 30% say it has been spoken about too little and a third (33%) believe it has been discussed about the right amount. These findings are echoed in our qualitative research with an online community of ethnic minorities, which show that for some the past year has encouraged them to talk about racism more openly whereas others feel much less comfortable talking about it. 

However, there are clear differences among the population:

  • Young people, aged 16-24, are more likely than older groups to say it has been discussed too little, 41% feel this way while just 12% think it is discussed too much.  But this balance of opinion is reversed among older people aged 55-75: 42% of them think racism is discussed too much, 22% too little. 
  • People from ethnic minority groups are significantly more likely to say it has been discussed too little, compared with those from White ethnic groups, by 47% vs 27%.  This rises to six in ten among Black people and those from mixed ethnic backgrounds.
  • Four in ten Labour and Remain voters think racism is discussed too little (43% and 41% respectively), but around half of Conservative and Leave voters think it is discussed too much (50% and 46%).

How much needs to be done to tackle racism?

A majority of Britons (54%) say that we need to do more to tackle racism faced by ethnic minorities in Britain today. Just under one in five (17%) say we are already doing enough to fight this type of discrimination while 13% think we are doing more than is needed. 

  • Two-thirds (65%) of people from ethnic minority groups say more needs to be done to fight racism, compared with 52% of people from White ethnic backgrounds
  • Young people are more likely to say more needs to be done, 58% of 16-34-year olds want more action to be taken while just under half of 55-75s feel the same (47%). 
  • Labour and Remain voters are particularly likely to say more needs to be done to tackle racism (seven in ten of both). Four in ten Conservative and Leave supporters feel the same way – around one in four think enough is being done and one in five that more is being done than necessary.
  • On this question, half of respondents were asked whether more should be done to tackle the inequalities – rather than racism - faced by ethnic minorities.  At an overall level, this makes little difference to the results, with 50% agreeing more needs to be done to tackle these inequalities.  However, there is slightly more difference when looking at the views of under 55s, 57% of whom think more should be done to tackle racism, compared with 51% who think more should be done when it is framed as reducing inequalities faced by ethnic minorities. 

Who is treated most unfairly by society?

Britons are most likely to see Black African people and Gypsies, Roma and Travellers as the groups treated most unfairly by society (27% and 25% respectively). Around one in five say Black Caribbean people (19%) and Pakistani people (18%) are among the most poorly treated people in Great Britain.  One in eight say White people are treated most unfairly by society (13%).

  • Young people aged 16-34 are particularly likely to highlight Black African people (37%), while older people are most likely to pick Gypsies, Roma and Travellers (29% of those aged 55-75). 
  • Black respondents are equally likely to pick out Black African (53%) and Black Caribbean (54%) people as those who are treated most unfairly by society, while Asian respondents are most likely to say Black African (40%) and Pakistani (33%) people.  
  • Labour and Remain voters are more likely to say several ethnic minority groups are treated unfairly by society.  One in five Conservative and Leave voters say White people are those treated most unfairly. 

Kully Kaur-Ballagan, Research Director at Ipsos MORI said:

As we mark the anniversary of the death of George Floyd, the conversation on racism over the last year has been brought to the fore, yet the public is fairly evenly split on whether we are giving the issue too much attention or too little – with clear differences by age, ethnicity, and political support. These findings are confirmed in our qualitative research among ethnic minorities who feel split on whether the last year has made them feel more or less comfortable talking about race and racism. The majority of the public, though, do acknowledge that more needs to be done to tackle the racism that ethnic minorities in Britain face today – particularly among ethnic minorities themselves.  

(Ipsos MORI)

25 May 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/ipsos-mori/en-uk/british-perceptions-racism-and-inequality-one-year-after-george-floyd

 

692-43-06/Poll

A Third Of UK Adults Say Their Hunch Or Feel Is The Most Important Factor When Deciding How To Bet (35%) During Gambling

The odds given to teams in a match are not nearly as important to British punters as hunch or feel, according to a new YouGov survey shows betting intentions around the 2020 UEFA European Football Championship. 

As excitement builds around the Euros – which was postponed until June of this year because of the COVID-19 pandemic – our survey shows 18% of UK adults are likely to place money on some aspect of the tournament. 

Among our findings, roughly a third of those UK adults say their hunch or feel is the most important factor when deciding how to bet (35%), more of a factor than the previous results of a team (22%) or the odds (14%). Other things that factor into a punter’s decision include promotions available (12%) and support for one’s country (7%). 

Nearly three-quarters (72%) of adults likely to place a bet on the Euros will do so on individual matches, significantly more than the 42% who plan to bet on the championship winner. About one in five punters (22%) plan to put money on an accumulator or parlay, 19% will wager on a group winner and 15% will place in-game wagers. A small proportion will place prop bets (18%), spread bets (4%) or bets on other aspects of the tournament (2%). 

When it’s time to place a wager, most bettors will turn to online bookmakers to do so (76%), while just 15% will place a bet in-person. One in seven (14%) will place bets casually with family or friends. 

If you want to capture the attention of this audience, you might want to turn to social media, as roughly a quarter (26%) say they’ll be scrolling and chatting during matches. The same number (26%) will also be on gambling sites to check odds, place bets and cash out. More than one in seven (15%) will be searching for details about players, teams, and previous matches. One in five (21%) say they’ll attempt to keep working if the game takes place during working hours. 

The COVID-postponed Euros have been eagerly anticipated and, as one of the biggest sporting events to take place since the beginning of the pandemic, it’s likely to be a banner month for gambling providers. 

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(YouGov UK)

May 25, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/sport/articles-reports/2021/05/25/closer-look-gambling-intentions-around-euros

 

692-43-07/Poll

Two-Fifths (42%) Of The GB Population Has Investable Assets

The retail investment market has been stifled for some time, with many consumers not willing or lacking the confidence to invest their savings for better long-term growth. However, as we emerge from the global pandemic and consumer confidence returns, many will have the potential to invest and may be tempted to look for better returns than current interest rates can deliver. Understanding consumer attitudes towards investing has never been more important. 

Using YouGov Profiles, YouGov has developed a framework designed to help marketers better understand the portion of the British population with investable assets and their varying propensity to invest. It highlights the attitudes and behavioural traits of core consumer groups based on the value of the investable assets they have and the extent to which they look for profitable ways to invest money.

Before we go into further detail, here’s a quick glimpse at each segment:

Cautious savers: This group have a limited interest in investing and have investable assets of less than £100,000, representing 10.1m (42%) adults with investable assets.

Established wealth: This group have a high level of investable assets but are not interested in investing – representing 1.2m (5%) of adults with investable assets.

Later life potential: With assets worth £100,000 or more, this group is neutral on the question of investing it profitably. 0.7m (3%) adults with investable assets fall into this group.

First-time investors: This group have lower wealth but are looking for profitable ways to invest – making up 8.1m (34%) of adults with investable assets.

Experienced investors: The most willing and able group to invest their high worth, this group is made up of 3.9m (16%) adults with high amounts of investable wealth.

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Cautious savers

This group makes up more than two-fifths (42%) of the GB population with investable assets. With no more than £99,000 worth of investable wealth, ‘Cautious savers’ are typically younger than the wider group. One-third of them (34%) are aged between 18-45 as opposed to 28% of consumers in the wider group.

As the title suggests, ‘Cautious savers’ are far more inclined to consolidate their wealth through more conventional methods of saving. While half of them (51%) say that saving for the future is their main priority, seven in ten (70%) find the idea of investing in stocks too risky. For marketers of investment instruments, there is perhaps an opportunity to appeal to this group by highlighting the higher returns possible from investing than a simple savings account.

Established wealth

The average consumer who fits the ‘Established wealth’ profile is significantly older than the average British adult. Over half of them (54%) are aged over 55 against just 38% of all GB adults. They are nine percentage points likelier than the national sample to have life insurance, and are roughly ten times more likely to be covered by income protection.

The reluctance to invest probably stems from the fact that this group already feels financially secure. For instance, half of them (48%), compared to nearly two in five (38%) nationally, say they don’t have a budget to manage their finances. Three in ten (29%) also say they aren’t saving for anything in particular. While this group appears to be the toughest sell for marketers, they make up only 5% of all adults with investable assets.

Later life potential

The demographic make-up of those in ‘Later life potential’ is close to that of the ‘Established wealth’ segment, with 63% of consumers aged over 55. In the same vein, almost half (49%) of them are retired compared to just one in four (24%) nationally.

Consumers in this category are twice as likely as the average Brit to have a premium bond (33% vs 15%). They differ from the ‘Established wealth’ category in that they are neutral in their attitude towards investment. This group, which represents strong potential for investment firms, constitutes 3% of all GB adults with investable assets.

First-time investors

One in three (34%) of the wider adult population with investable wealth fall into this group. This group is younger than the national sample – two in five (39%) are aged under 34, compared to 28% of all Brits. Notably, three-fifths (61%) of them are male, representing a 13-percentage point increase over the general adult population.

Over half (56%) of ‘First-time investors’ prioritise saving for the future and three out of ten are saving to buy a property or for a deposit. Along expected lines, consumers in this bloc are more tech-savvy. More than one-third buy financial products online, while one in eight (13%) refer to financial websites before making investments.

Experienced investors

This is perhaps the most-coveted segment for marketers of investment instruments due to its combination of high investable wealth and amenability to investing. This group makes up a sizeable 16% of all British adults with investable assets. Three-fifths (61%) of ‘Experienced investors’ are over 55 years old and two in five (42%) are retired.

Most notably, they are almost three times as likely as the average Brit to say they like taking risks in the stock market. One-third (33%) of ‘Experienced investors’ say they like to take risks in the stock market, compared to one in eight (12%) across all GB adults. One-fifth (19%) have a managed portfolio, compared to one in twenty (5%) nationally.

 (YouGov UK)

May 25, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/finance/articles-reports/2021/05/25/yougov-framework-attitudes-investing

 

692-43-08/Poll

Among The Football Clubs In UK Leicester City Is At Peak With 28.7 Points In May

As the English football season draws to a close, it's a good time to look at how the season’s top on-field performing clubs are scoring off the field in terms of consumer perceptions.

We looked at perceptions of a handful of this season’s successful teams using our YouGov FootballIndex tool. For those who don’t follow football closely, here’s the background:

  • Leicester City triumphed in the FA Cup Final against Chelsea
  • Manchester City secured the Premier League title with a few games to spare
  • They meet Chelsea in the UEFA Champions League final
  • Manchester United have reached the Europa League final and came second in the league
  • Liverpool are last year’s title winners and finished in third place this season.

The results

Leicester City witnessed a dramatic surge after lifting the FA Cup with their victory over Chelsea on May 15. The club had a score of 6.4 on May 14 (the only one of our clubs to begin the period with a positive score) and registered daily increments after winning the final, to peak at 28.7 on May 22.

Manchester City, one of the ‘Big 6’ clubs whose Buzz scores plummeted during the European Super League saga, witnessed a resurgence after they secured the Premier League title for the fifth time in nine seasons. They rose from -1.2 on the eve of securing the title on May 12 to 9.7 on May 18. The club’s Buzz score has since gradually tapered off to reach 6.4 on May 23. Pep Guardiola’s team will have a chance to build on the gains in the Champions League final against Chelsea on May 30.

Chelsea will be keen to claim the European title after their loss in the FA Cup final. The club’s Buzz score was on the mend after the ESL episode but has steadily declined to 0.5 after the defeat. A strong performance in the Champions League final could well turn the trend for them.

It seems that winning trophies isn’t the only way to create a Buzz. Liverpool, who won each of their last five Premier League matches to finish third, registered steady upticks to reach a Buzz score of 9.1. On the other hand, Manchester United, who won only one of their last four Premier League matches, languished at -8.9 despite finishing second in the Premier League. The Red Devils will have a chance to recover some glory in the Europa League final on May 27.

(YouGov UK)

May 26, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/sport/articles-reports/2021/05/26/which-uk-football-clubs-generating-most-buzz

 

692-43-09/Poll

Two In Five (39%) Britons Say They Do Not Intend To Switch An Insurance Policy In The Next 12 Months

Insurance is meant to provide consumers with peace of mind in the event that their car breaks down, their home gets burgled, or their lives unexpectedly end. But how many Britons are happy with their providers?  

Data from YouGov Profiles indicates that, among policyholders of any kind of insurance product, just two in five (39%) say they do not intend to switch a policy in the next 12 months, with 15% saying they don’t know if they plan to change providers or not.  That leaves 46% of policyholders looking to make a change.  

As for the areas where they’re looking to make it, nearly two in five Britons who have a fully comprehensive motor insurance policy (37%) say they plan to switch their provider in the next year. Of consumers with home/building contents insurance, a similar proportion (36%) want to change insurer in the coming 12 months, while almost a quarter of those with standalone home contents insurance (23%) say the same. 

Among Britons with annual travel insurance, 15% intend to switch their provider, and the same proportion of pet insurance policyholders are planning on a change. Meanwhile, just 4% of those with private medical insurance plan to change their insurer. This may be because, as Britain offers healthcare that’s free at the point of use, private medical insurance tends to be more of an employer benefit than an everyday necessity.  

Britons with insurance policies tend to be active when they plan to switch. Seven in ten say they’re either active or very active when they’re shopping around for a new provider (70%) – rising to three-quarters of those with comprehensive motor insurance (75%). When searching for a new insurer, almost three in five (77%) use price comparison sites such as GoCompare, while three in ten (29%) use the websites of insurance providers or brokers that they know and nearly a fifth (18%) rely on word of mouth recommendations from friends and family. Some 14% use consumer financial advice websites such as Money Advice Service and MoneySavingExpert, while 8% say they still ring insurers and brokers on the phone to get a quote. 

(YouGov UK)

May 27, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/finance/articles-reports/2021/05/27/which-insurance-policies-are-britons-most-likely-s

 

692-43-10/Poll

One In Four Germans Can Imagine Buying A Self-Driving Car

If the federal government has  its way, self-driving cars will soon be allowed on German roads  . The Bundestag has passed a corresponding law, now it goes to the Bundesrat. Did the people's representatives make decisions in the interests of the people? The YouGov study  "Automobile Services and Consumer Insights"  reveals, among other things, how Germans feel about autonomous cars. Almost half of the respondents (48 percent) say that autonomous vehicles scare them.

Not all autonomous cars are the same. A distinction is made, for example, between level 3, level 4 and level 5, highly automated,  fully automated and autonomous driving , i.e. roughly according to how much a person still has to or can intervene. Many respondents are unlikely to be aware of these nuances, as 58 percent state that they have not yet dealt with the topic. 23 percent of the respondents oppose this and say that they are very concerned with the topic of “autonomous driving”.

AUTONOMOUS TAXIS ARE IMAGINABLE FOR MANY

Even if the new law  paves the way for (partially) autonomous vehicles to be on the road outside of test sites and pilot projects, experts have different views as to when and in what form self-driving cars will really become everyday life. Whether in five or ten years, and whether first in taxis in the city or in trucks on the freeway is an open question. According to earlier forecasts, autonomous cars should have been widespread long ago. Accordingly, the respondents in the study are divided. 43 percent can imagine that at some point all vehicles will be autonomous, while 43 percent also believe that completely autonomous road traffic is unimaginable.

Despite the uncertain time frame, a good number of Germans are positive about their own use of autonomous cars. 36 percent would get into an autonomous taxi, 28 percent would consider sharing offers with autonomous cars. 27 percent can even imagine buying or leasing an autonomous car themselves.

PROSPECTIVE BUYERS WANT ADDITIONAL DIGITAL SERVICES

We can take a closer look at this group of potential buyers of autonomous cars with our target group analysis tool, YouGov Profiles. Most of them are young people between the ages of 18 and 34. This is also the age group most likely to believe that autonomous cars can make road traffic safer and reduce accidents. Most of the prospective buyers, 61 percent, are male.

When choosing a car brand, the most important thing for Germans is the price-performance ratio, followed by quality / service life as well as follow-up and maintenance costs. Anyone interested in buying an autonomous car pays more attention than other consumers to the innovative strength and reputation of the brand and the availability of exclusive, limited models. Digital mobility services, such as connected car functions, are already particularly important for this target group. People in this group are more often than other consumers explicitly willing to pay for additional components in vehicle communication - such as operating certain functions via smartphone app or tracking the car in the event of theft or emergencies. In addition, they are more likely to imagine one Buy car online .

(YouGov Germany)

May 25, 2021

Source: https://yougov.de/news/2021/05/25/jeder-vierte-kann-sich-vorstellen-ein-autonom-fahr/

 

692-43-11/Poll

A Majority Of French Students Say They Have Little Confidence In The Future (54%) 

The pandemic: a blast for students

The coronavirus crisis was experienced as a real shock for the students of the grandes écoles who experience concerns and difficulties in projecting themselves into the future. Almost two-thirds of them felt they had dropped out during their year of study (63%) and believe that they will have to make concessions for their first job compared to what they had envisaged before the Covid19 (63%). Even more, a majority of students say they have little confidence in the future (54%) and 18% have given up on their professional project and no longer know what to do with regard to their future.

Beyond the impact of the pandemic on their professional trajectory, most of the students felt that they had been sacrificed : 83% of them felt that the quality of their training had been affected, 79% thought have been deprived of their best years and 71% feel they belong to a generation sacrificed in the name of health security.

“  In the short term, the crisis has deeply affected the students of the grandes écoles, who have suffered in many ways from this unprecedented situation. In the long run, no one can predict how the widely felt sense of injustice will translate. Companies and managers will undoubtedly have to redouble their attention to integrate this next generation of assets as effectively as possible, ” notes Jean-Michel Caye , Senior Associate Director at BCG.

Despite the crisis, young people's expectations of the world of work remain the same as their search for meaning grows stronger

Despite the pandemic, the professional aspirations of young talent have not changed fundamentally. The interest of the position, the atmosphere within the company and the fact that it is in phase with their values ​​remain the essential criteria of choice, far ahead of the remuneration (which comes in 11th position ), or the possibility telework (19th position) .

Far from received ideas, large groups remain the number one choice for students and graduates and their attractiveness is increasing even among young workers: 51% of students and 50% of graduates wish to join a large group . Conversely, interest in startups is declining with only 14% of students and graduates of grandes écoles who would like to work in this universe. 

The hierarchy of privileged sectors has also changed little compared to previous editions of the barometer: the environment is still largely in the lead with 71% of students and 81% of graduates interested in working there, followed by the energy sector , consulting and humanitarian . A podium consistent with the answer coming at the top when asked what would make them proud during their professional life: "To have been useful, to have brought positive changes to society".

A search for meaning that can be found in the trade-off between job security and commitment: for equal pay, 63% of students would prefer a more precarious but meaningful job rather than a stable job that is further removed from their values. . Young workers would be ready to reduce their wages by 12% on average to go and work in a company that is more in line with their social and environmental convictions.

Young people who are more demanding with regard to companies and the usefulness of their profession on a daily basis

If the expectations of young talents towards large companies are high, they consider that they are not at the level of their capacity for action . Alongside associations and NGOs, start-ups, civil society and public authorities, large companies are 86% considered by young talents as the most likely to be able to change things . Conversely, they arrive at the bottom of the ranking in terms of commitment with only 31% of them who consider them committed, a figure however slightly up compared to previous barometers. Young people are also wary of greenwashingand more than half of them consider that companies put in place a policy and actions of engagement above all out of opportunism and to improve their image .

Beyond the question of the company's commitments, young talent above all aspire to be useful in their daily work. To the question "What is more important for you when we talk to you about meaning at work in a company?" », The fact of having a visibility on the interest of its tasks and how they contribute to the performance of the company comes first. "No question of finding yourself doing" an empty job ". Young people obviously look at the companies' commitment and their sincerity, but also, and above all, look at the usefulness of their missions and their contribution to the company. » According to Laurent Champaney , Vice-president of the Conférence des grandes écoles.

(Ipsos France)

May 27, 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/fr-fr/generation-covid-comment-les-jeunes-des-grandes-ecoles-voient-ils-leur-avenir-professionnel

 

692-43-12/Poll

27% Of Spaniards Affirm That The Management Was "Very Bad" Regarding The Diplomatic Relations Between The Monarchy Of Morocco And The Government Of Spain

The deterioration of diplomatic relations between the Monarchy of Morocco and the Government of Spain caused, on May 17, 2021, the massive crossing of people on the border between both countries.

This migratory incident has caused a great stir in the Spanish political and social arena. For this reason, from YouGov, we have analyzed the opinion that Spaniards have about the actions of the Government of Spain and other institutions involved in the diplomatic crisis.

The Government of Spain, the opposition and the Moroccan Authorities suspend the management of the conflict, while NGOs, Army and FCS approve

27% of Spaniards affirm that the management by the Government of Spain was "very bad", compared to 4% of the population that thinks that the actions were "very good". On average, the Government of Spain obtains a 4.32 score out of 10.

The opposition receives even more criticism, since for 33% the performance of this institution was "very bad", compared to 4% who declared otherwise. On average, the performance of the opposition receives a score of 3.67 out of 10.

In the last position are the Moroccan Authorities, which is, according to the Spanish population, the institution that has performed the worst in the face of the diplomatic crisis, receiving a score of 2 out of 10. 63% of citizens think that their actions were "very bad ", compared to 1% who affirm otherwise.

On the contrary, the performance of the NGOs in the diplomatic crisis obtained an approval rating of 6.8 points out of ten. In this case, 5% of the population thinks that they acted "very badly", compared to 27% of the population that thinks that their actions were very good.

The Army and FCS are, in the opinion of the Spaniards, the groups with the most successful performance during the conflict, obtaining a score of 7.33 out of ten, where 27% of the population rate the action by the army and FCS as very good.

 (YouGov Spain)
May 26, 2021

Source: https://es.yougov.com/news/2021/05/26/el-gobierno-de-espana-suspende-su-actuacion-en-la-/

 

 

NORTH AMERICA

692-43-13/Poll

More Than Nine-In-Ten (95%) Foreign Policy Scholars And American Public Agree That U.S. Standing Abroad Is Important

An overwhelming majority of Americans agree it is important that the United States is generally respected by other countries around the world, according to a Pew Research Center survey conducted in February. And a new parallel survey of international relations scholars finds that academics are in lockstep with the U.S. public on the importance of America’s image abroad.

International relations scholars and American public hold similar views on importance of U.S. global image

Overall, more than nine-in-ten IR scholars surveyed (95%) say it is very or somewhat important that the U.S. is respected by other countries around the world, including 56% who say it is very important, according to the online poll conducted in April and May by the Teaching, Research and International Policy (TRIP) Project at the College of William & Mary.

Similarly, 87% of U.S. adults surveyed say respect for the U.S. abroad is vital, including half who say it is very important. Only 5% and 13% of the IR scholars and American public, respectively, say this is not too or not at all important.

Among Americans overall, there are some demographic differences when it comes to the importance of U.S. respect abroad. While most Americans generally say it is important, only 29% of those ages 18 to 29 say it is very important, compared with 62% of those 65 and older. Democrats and those who lean toward the Democratic Party are also slightly more likely than Republicans and GOP leaners to say it is very important that the U.S. is respected abroad (54% vs. 46%).

Among the IR scholars surveyed, those who identify as Republican or independent are also slightly less likely than those who identify as Democratic to say it is very important that the U.S. garners respect abroad. Still, 92% of IR scholars who identify as Republican or independent see America’s international image as at least somewhat important, compared with 98% among IR scholars who identify as Democratic.

When it comes to how the U.S. is actually perceived internationally, IR scholars are negative in their assessments. A 58% majority believes the U.S. is less respected by other countries today compared with the past, while only 28% think the U.S. is more respected. An additional 14% think the nation’s standing with other countries has remained unchanged.

A growing share of international relations scholars say the U.S. is more respected abroad than in the past

This represents a departure from previous TRIP surveys, when views of America’s position were almost universally negative. Since the last time this question was asked in 2018, the share of IR scholars who say the U.S. is less respected than in the past has declined by 35 percentage points (from 93% to 58%). As negative assessments have waned, the view that the U.S. is commanding more respect has grown more common, increasing 26 points since 2018 (from 2% to 28%).

Partisan divides may account for the sunnier outlooks about America’s global image among IR scholars. Among the scholars surveyed this year, Democrats are 14 percentage points more likely than Republicans and independents to say America’s reputation is on the rise, while the latter group is more likely to say the U.S.’s standing has not changed. Notably, though, similar shares of Republicans, independents and Democrats all say the U.S. is less respected today than in the past.

Among the general public, partisans are generally more likely to think America’s global standing is improving – and less likely to think it is declining – when a president from their own party is in office.

The TRIP Project survey also finds that President Joe Biden’s policies and leadership skills are generally popular with foreign policy academics. Biden has made clear that strengthening America’s image abroad, especially among allies, is a key goal of his administration. And early data shows that views of the U.S. improved considerably in France, Germany and the United Kingdom following Biden’s election.

(PEW)

MAY 24, 2021

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/05/24/foreign-policy-scholars-and-american-public-agree-that-u-s-standing-abroad-is-important/

 

692-43-14/Poll

In Both Parties, Fewer Now Say Being Christian Or Being Born In U.S. Is Important To Being Truly American

Republicans and Democrats continue to differ over the factors they see as important for being “truly American,” such as being Christian or being born in the United States. But within both parties, the share of people who see these and other factors as important has significantly decreased between 2016 and November 2020.

For example, the share of Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents who say it is important to be born in the U.S. to be truly American has fallen by half, from 50% in 2016 to just a quarter in 2020. And while majorities of Democrats believe speaking English and sharing U.S. customs and traditions are important for being truly American (65% and 59%, respectively), these shares have also seen a marked decrease since 2016 (from 87% and 79%, respectively).

Compared with in 2016, fewer Republicans and Democrats now say being Christian and being born in the U.S. are important to being ‘truly American’

There have also been decreases in the shares of Republicans and Republican leaners who think certain criteria are important to national belonging. In 2016, majorities of Republicans said it was important for being truly American to be Christian (63%) and to have been born in the U.S. (60%); in 2020, around half of Republicans said each of these is important (48% and 46%, respectively). The share of Republicans who say it is important to speak English has also fallen by 7 percentage points, though nearly nine-in-ten still see this as important. The importance of sharing American customs and traditions has remained steady among Republicans since 2016.

Ideological splits within both parties on what it takes to be ‘truly American’

Within each party, there are strong ideological divides over the factors people see as important for being truly American. On every factor tested, conservative Republicans are the most likely – and liberal Democrats the least likely – to think each quality is important. For example, half of conservative Republicans say it is important to have been born in the U.S. to be truly American, and roughly another half say the same about being a Christian; only around a third of liberal and moderate Republicans share those views. Similarly, nearly four-in-ten conservative and moderate Democrats think it is important to be a Christian, with a roughly equal share saying the same about being born in the U.S. Only about one-in-ten liberal Democrats hold those opinions.

Fewer Republicans in the fall of 2020 say immigrants want to be distinct from U.S. society

Just as Republicans and Democrats have relaxed their criteria for national belonging in recent years, Americans overall are also less likely today to believe that immigrants want to be distinct from American society. In 2020, 28% of U.S. adults said this, down from 37% in 2018, the last time the question was asked.

Much of the change in views of immigrants’ attitudes towards assimilation has been driven by Republicans. The share of Republicans who say immigrants want to be separate from American society has fallen by 18 percentage points since 2018, from 59% then to 41% in 2020. Views among Democrats have remained largely unchanged.

A more recent survey by the Center, conducted in April, found that Americans – and especially Republicans – are critical of the government’s handling of the situation at the U.S.-Mexico border.

(PEW)

MAY 25, 2021

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/05/25/in-both-parties-fewer-now-say-being-christian-or-being-born-in-u-s-is-important-to-being-truly-american/

 

692-43-15/Poll

Twenty-Four Percent Of Black And Hispanic Employees Reported Experiencing Discrimination At Work In The Past 12 Months

A recent Gallup survey of U.S. workers finds that workplace discrimination can affect employees' perceptions of an organization's culture, their opportunities, and their coworkers' intentions. Workplace discrimination can also affect their feelings of psychological safety and belonging and their ability to do their best work.

But workplace discrimination doesn't affect everyone equally. Twenty-four percent of Black and Hispanic employees reported experiencing discrimination at work in the past 12 months, as did 15% of White employees and 16% of Asian employees. But 75% of Black employees say that discrimination was related to their race or ethnicity, compared with 61% of Hispanic and 42% of White workers. And the Gallup study finds that discrimination undermines employee wellbeing, more so for Black and Hispanic workers than White ones.

Difference in percentage with thriving wellbeing for employees who have experienced discrimination in the past 12 months, by race/ethnicity.

White

Black

Hispanic

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

%

%

%

%

%

%

Thriving

56

54

51

37

53

38

GALLUP PANEL, NOV. 6-DEC. 1, 2020

Though the experience of discrimination is unique to the individual, the survey shows that the perception of discrimination has a more profound and pervasive effect on Black and Hispanic employees than on White ones. That disparity holds important implications for organizational cultures, workplace outcomes and wellbeing. To understand those implications -- and engineer greater inclusivity -- it's important for leaders to first understand the impact of the experience of discrimination on employees and employers.

Engagement and Satisfaction

Discrimination, understandably, drains employees' motivation, commitment to their jobs and their engagement. For example, those who report discrimination in their workplace are less likely to strongly agree that they have the opportunity to do what they do best, that their opinions count, or that someone at work cares about them as a person. And those who endure discrimination are much more likely to be attrition risks -- whether actively looking for another job or watching for opportunities -- than employees who don't feel discriminated against.

Indeed, Black and Hispanic employees who experience discrimination are substantially less likely to report being satisfied with their place of employment as a place to work, even less satisfied than White employees who feel discriminated against. Strikingly, there is less than a 1 percentage point difference in overall satisfaction for White workers who experience discrimination versus those who don't, but overall satisfaction is 9 points lower for Hispanic employees and 13 points lower for Black employees who report discrimination compared with those who don't.

Black employees who experience discrimination are also 6x less likely than White and 4x less likely than Hispanic employees to say they would recommend their organization as a great place to work. Considering that approximately one in four Black workers say they've faced discrimination, the experience of discrimination makes it improbable that organizational alumni will become brand ambassadors. And Gallup finds that, as it is, only 10% of Americans strongly agree they'd recommend their former employer as a place to work.

Difference in percentage on workplace dimensions for employees who have experienced discrimination in the past 12 months, by race/ethnicity.

White

Black

Hispanic

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

%

%

%

%

%

%

Engaged

41

36

37

23

36

21

Extremely satisfied with your place of employment as a place to work

35

35

30

17

31

22

Actively looking for another job/Watching for job opportunities

37

74

52

70

48

74

Extremely likely to recommend this organization as a great place to work

34

32

32

20

28

25

GALLUP PANEL, NOV. 6-DEC. 1, 2020

Inclusion

Gallup's definition of inclusion is "an environment that makes people feel welcome, respected and valued." It's to be expected, then, that employees who report experiencing discrimination at work in the past 12 months are far less likely to strongly agree that they are treated with respect, feel like valued members of their team, or are comfortable being themselves at work. Those effects are felt with greater magnitude among Black employees than other ethnic groups, and it appears to significantly affect Black employees' sense of autonomy -- about half as many Black workers as Hispanic or White employees can strongly agree that they have the freedom to make the decisions they need to do their jobs well -- 17% among Black workers who report having an experience with discrimination compared to 27% of White workers and 28% of Hispanic workers who report having an experience with discrimination.

The perception of discrimination has a more profound and pervasive effect on Black and Hispanic employees than on White ones.

A feeling of exclusion can prompt employees to develop a persona -- or "code switch" -- to enable their inclusion. That behavior saps employees' energy and cloaks their full value. In fact, among those who say they've been discriminated against, the percentage of Black and Hispanic employees who say their unique strengths are being developed is far lower than the percentage of White employees who say their employers build on their strengths.

Difference in percentage who strongly agree for employees who have experienced discrimination in the past 12 months, by race/ethnicity.

White

Black

Hispanic

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

%

%

%

%

%

%

At work, I feel comfortable being myself.

43

29

45

26

44

30

I feel like a valued member of my team.

42

29

38

20

38

27

My current employer is committed to building the strengths of each employee.

28

27

27

16

28

20

My supervisor creates an environment that is trusting and open.

37

28

33

20

35

22

GALLUP PANEL, NOV. 6-DEC. 1, 2020

Fairness and Equity

The study found that those who feel they've been discriminated against tend to have a negative view of fairness and equity in their companies. Though that perception was found among all ethnic groups, it's more pervasive among Black and Hispanic workers -- some of whom feel discrimination isn't just personal, it's systemic -- and it can breed skepticism that the company can be trusted to do the right thing in matters of compliance, ethics, integrity and advancement.

In fact, Black workers who report experiencing discrimination in the workplace are less likely to say their workplace supports their development, goals and hopes of advancement.

That's why leaders should understand that workers can perceive discrimination as both personal and institutional. Considering that most Black and Hispanic workers attribute their discrimination to racism, and they're more dubious about their organization's commitment to racial justice or equality, a lived experience of discrimination at work will constantly undermine leaders' diversity-positive rhetoric and initiatives -- and may deplete the employee's will to engage in the work.

Difference in percent who strongly agree for employees who have experienced discrimination in the past 12 months, by race/ethnicity.

White

Black

Hispanic

No

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

%

%

%

%

%

%

My organization is fair to everyone.

30

27

28

12

31

18

If I raised a concern about how I am treated, I am confident my employer would do what is right.

35

27

35

19

35

20

If I raised a concern about ethics and integrity, I am confident my employer would do what is right.

37

34

35

20

36

17

I have the same opportunities for advancement as everyone else.

36

32

32

16

34

21

My workplace gives all employees equal opportunity to advance to senior management.

24

29

24

14

27

19

GALLUP PANEL, NOV. 6-DEC. 1, 2020

Disengagement is costly. Gallup analytics estimates the global economy loses $7 trillion a year to disengagement. Highly disengaged companies bear the greatest burden of that -- and the perception of discrimination can clearly deepen employee disengagement.

Leaders can reverse engagement problems, though Gallup finds leaders are more liable to be effective if they seek to become aware of discrimination issues and take action. In specific:

  • Listen to employees. Assessing the absence of discrimination complaints as the presence of inclusion can be dangerous: Gallup research shows that most U.S. employees don't report instances of ethical breaches they've felt or witnessed. The simplest way to avoid that danger is to ask employees about their experience with pulse surveys, town halls, focus groups, or one-on-one conversations. If designed to guard employees' sense of psychological safety -- which may be more achievable on a team level or in an employee resource group -- those platforms offer leaders meaningful insights about discrimination they can otherwise miss and demonstrate that leaders care about their employees as people.
  • Build responsive infrastructure. Gallup finds that employees -- in particular Black or Hispanic workers -- who feel they've been discriminated against are less likely to think their opinions count and are more skeptical that their employer "would do what is right" with a report of discrimination. Leaders should clearly message inclusive values in the policies, procedures, practices and incentives that address systemic inequality and hold all employees accountable for them. The infrastructure of reporting -- whether a hotline, a conversation with a DEI officer or a manager, or other means -- must reinforce the individual's worth and the company's values. That said, it's usually the manager who actualizes inclusion in teams, and most need better development: Only 10% of managers strongly agree compliance/ethics training programs change the way they do their jobs.

Concern that investigating discrimination opens an organization to liabilities is reasonable, but the existence of discrimination is far more damaging than awareness of it. People who feel discriminated against are often less engaged, have poorer wellbeing, and, logically, would prefer to work elsewhere. Their employers are less profitable as a result.

Understanding the perception of discrimination -- especially discrimination's highly malignant effect on Black and Hispanic workers -- is a first step toward a different, better employee experience. The next step is reinforcing a culture of inclusion fueled by leaders who want better for and from their organizations.

(Gallup USA)

MAY 26, 2021

Source: https://www.gallup.com/workplace/349865/understanding-effects-discrimination-workplace.aspx

 

692-43-16/Poll

Home Buying Intentions in Ontario Hold Steady (19%), With Likely Buyers Anticipating Paying 12% More for a Home in the Next Year

 

Toronto, ON, May 25, 2021 – Ontario’s real estate market has not shown signs of cooling down during the past year; a recent Ipsos poll on behalf of the Ontario Real Estate Association (OREA) has revealed that home buying intentions unchanged from February 2020, with one in five (19%) Ontario adults say they are likely (6% very/13%somewhat) to buy a home in the next twelve months. Whether a product of the pandemic or changes in their family, one in five (21%) likely homebuyers in Ontario is an “upgrader”, meaning that their main reason for buying was needing a larger home.

The research also found that as demand for homes with more space goes up, homebuyers are expecting to pay more for their homes. On average, likely buyers in Ontario estimate they will pay $610,208 for their new home, a 12% increase from last year’s estimations. However, buyers’ expectations are still not keeping in lockstep with those of likely sellers in Ontario, who on average anticipate selling their home for over $50,000 more than last year ($663,647).

 

Pandemic Underscored Need for Larger Homes

Reasons for why prospective buyers are currently choosing to buy vary. In addition to the two in ten (21%) likely buyers saying their main motivation is needing a larger home, one in ten (12%) say low interest rates are the main reason why they’re looking to buy, followed by changes in their lives due to the pandemic (9%).

Main Reason Behind Timing for Home Purchase

Reason

% of likely buyers in Ontario

I need a larger home

21%

I want to own my own home

20%

Low mortgage/interest rates

12%

I’m looking to move closer to family/friends

10%

Changes to my life due to the pandemic

9%

There’s been a change in my family situation

9%

I’m retiring

6%

I’ve found a new job and need to relocate

3%

Other

11%

 

Even if just one in ten (9%) likely home buyers in Ontario specifically mentioned the pandemic as the main motivation behind planning to buy in the next 12 months, It is clear that COVID-19 has impacted likely buyers’ decision-making calculus or preferences in various other ways, even if it wasn’t their main reason. The top-three motivations included re-evaluated priorities (24%), seeing strong growth in the market (23%), and simply wanting to live somewhere less densely populated (23%). Other concerns such as needing space for a home office/gym/schooling were also high (19%), alongside having saved money throughout the year (19%).

Ways COVID-19 Impacted Decision to Buy Home

Reason

% of likely buyers in Ontario

I re-evaluated my priorities when buying a home

24%

Given strong growth in the market, I feel I have to act now

23%

I want to live somewhere less densely populated

23%

I need more space for home office/gym/schooling

19%

I have saved more money throughout the year, so I can afford to buy

19%

I have more time to search for a home and move right now

17%

I don’t need to commute into work as often

16%

Other

13%

 

Furthermore, the pandemic influenced buyers in a few other key areas. For example, nearly three in ten (28%) are looking into homes:

  • with a yard/more outdoor space (28%),
  • that are more affordable (28%),
  • that can accommodate a home office/work from home space (25%).

Finally, the (nearly) million-dollar question is how much Ontarians anticipate paying for their home. On average, likely homebuyers in Ontario anticipate a purchase price of $610,208, an increase of 12% (+$66,941) from last year’s estimations. Highlighting the continued interest in real estate during a pandemic, prices are up across the province, with the City of Toronto registering the smallest percentage increase in anticipated purchase price (+$42,403 to $698,442), but still representing an increase of 6.5%.

However, average anticipated purchase price masks some disparities among likely buyers. For instance, the proportion of those anticipating buying homes worth $1,000,000+ has increased (14%, +6). On the other end of the spectrum, first-time homebuyers, making up a quarter (26%) of likely buyers, anticipate spending considerably less ($503,964, +$49,475), but collectively still estimate they will pay 11% more than last year.

 

Some Eschewing Condos, Turning to Detached Homes

As might be expected as a by-product of the pandemic, likely buyers are a little more interested in purchasing detached homes than they were last year (63%, +3). This tendency is magnified in older age groups, likely due to their greater purchasing power (56%, -1 among 18-34 years, 66%, +6 among 35-54 years, 71%, +6 among 55+ years). This increased interest comes at the expense of high-rise condos, which have seen purchase intentions decline slightly.

Type of Home Most Likely to Buy, By Age Group and Type of Buyer

Δ indicates change from 2020

 

Total

Δ

18-34

Δ

35-54

Δ

55+

Δ

First- Time

Δ

Upgrader

Δ

Detached home

63%

+3

56%

-1

66%

+6

71%

+6

50%

-1

75%

+9

Town/rowhouse

14%

-1

16%

+1

13%

-2

11%

-

21%

-1

10%

+1

Semi-detached

9%

-

11%

-

9%

-

4%

-1

10%

-

9%

-4

High-rise condo

(6+ stories)

8%

-2

11%

-2

7%

-3

5%

-4

11%

-1

6%

-2

Low-rise condo

(<5 stories)

6%

-

6%

+2

5%

-1

10%

-

7%

+3

1%

-3

 

The fact remains that a majority (63%, +3) of homebuyers are most likely to buy a detached home, with smaller proportions likely to buy a town/rowhouse (14%, -1), high-rise condo (8%, -2), semi-detached (9%) or low-rise condo (6%). In general, the inclination towards a detached home grows with age, although some Boomers are opting for low-rise condos (10%), more so than any other generation. This is likely reflecting those older Ontarians who have become ‘empty nesters’ and are subsequently looking to downsize.

Upgraders (75%) are far more likely than first-time homebuyers (50%) to be buying a detached home, a trend that has only grown in the past year. Given the higher price-point of a detached home, using one’s existing equity can help greatly. As such, upgraders are slightly less interested in semi-detached and condominiums. These same shifts are not present among first-time homebuyers. While half do say they are likely to buy a detached home, their newness to the real estate market likely means a smaller budget. As such they may be more drawn to less expensive homes such as town/rowhouses (21%), high-rise condos (11%), or low-rise condos (7%) than those looking to upgrade their home.

 

Escape to the Country?

Amidst concerns about urban flight and greater interest in detached homes in recent months, where are Ontarians likely to buy their homes?

Location Most Likely to Buy Home, By Age Group

Δ indicates change from 2020

 

Total

Δ

18-34

Δ

35-54

Δ

55+

Δ

Downtown/urban area

20%

-4

26%

-5

19%

-7

9%

-2

Suburban area

37%

+1

38%

+3

40%

-

30%

-2

Small city/town

24%

-

19%

-4

23%

+5

38%

+2

Rural area

19%

+3

17%

+6

18%

+2

23%

+1

While there is slightly more interest in buying a home in rural areas and less interest in buying a large urban area compared to last year, homes in suburban locations and small city/towns also remain popular. Those aged 18-34 are still more likely than other generations to be looking at buying in downtown/urban cores (26%, -5), though interest in buying homes in rural areas has increased within this age group since last year (17%, +6). Among those aged 35-54, interest in downtown/urban cores is down (19%, -7), but interest in small cities/towns is up (23%, +5). As for likely buyers aged 55+, they largely have not changed their minds from last year as to where they would like to buy a home.

While nearly seven in ten (68%) likely buyers indicate that the pandemic has not changed where they were looking for a home, there are interesting differences around how this breaks down by age:

  • Among likely buyers aged 55+ years, 81% say they had always intended to buy in their preferred location, reflecting this older buyers’ preference for less crowded areas even before the pandemic.
  • Among likely buyers aged 18-34 years, 20% said they were looking at downtown homes, but the pandemic made them less appealing (compared to 6% among 55+ years).

Younger Buyers Getting into Investment Property, Tempted by Lower Interest Rates

Among those two in ten Ontarians who say they are likely to buy a home within the next 12 months, over three-quarters (78%) are looking for a primary home in which to live (unchanged from February 2020), while 17% are focused on buying an investment property (+1) and 5% are looking for a vacation property (unch.). However, those aged 18-34 years are a little more likely to be looking for an investment property (22%, +4), than other age groups (16%, -1 among 35-54 years, 8%, -3 among 55+ years).

Younger Ontarians’ interest in investment properties may not necessarily be a sign that they are hungrier for investment income than other age groups; rather, it could simply be an issue of timing, as older Ontarians who could be interested in investment properties may have already bought theirs a long time ago.

A quarter (26%) of those looking to buy a home will be first-time homebuyers (and understandably, those aged 18-34 are the most likely to be first-time buyers (37%, -5 v. 24%, +1 among 35-54 years and 7%. -1 among 55+ years). In fact, younger buyers are more likely to say that lower interest rates have influenced their decision to buy a home in some way (85% v. 46% among 55+), with more saying that lower rates mean that they can have a shorter mortgage (30% among 18-34 years v.12% among 55+ years) and that they can buy an investment property or vacation home (13% among 18-34 years v. 8% among 55+ years).

While new builds are popular (31%), they are particularly popular among likely buyers aged 18-34 (38%), while older likely buyers are a little less keen (20%). Furthermore, those looking to upgrade their home are more likely to want a new build (37%).

(Ipsos Canada)

25 May 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-ca/news-polls/Home-Buying-Intentions-in-Ontario-Hold-Steady

 

692-43-17/Poll

Nearly All Canadians (93%) Agree Everyone Must Do Their Part To Make Roads Safe

According to a recent Ipsos study on behalf of Parachute, half or more say they would like to see arrests for impaired driving, police checking for impaired driving, and separate bicycle lanes to be implemented. There is less enthusiasm among reduced speed limits, with only one in five indicating they would like to see this measure in their community.

Road Safety and Dangers

  • Looking at the past five years, Canadians agree there has been an increase in dangerous activity, with most saying people walking while talking on a cell phone has increased over the past five years. Canadians also indicate there has been a rise in individuals driving after using cannabis.
  • Despite previous figures showing that Canadians perceive the roads as overall safe, when probed specifically on different travel methods, ratings are lower. Six in ten say the roads are safe for drivers and passengers in vehicles, while fewer find the roads safe for pedestrians (34%) or motorcyclists (24%).
  • Nearly all Canadians agree that everyone must do their part to make the roads safe, with 63% strongly agreeing. As well, eight in ten (78%) agree that injuries from road crashes are preventable.

Road Safety Effectiveness

  • Canadians show interest in a variety of traffic calming or enforcement measures. Half or more say they would like to see arrests for impaired driving, police checking for impaired driving, and separate bicycle lanes to be implemented.
  • Turning to measures in the community, Canadians are less enthusiastic regarding reduced speed limits. Though, those aged 16-17, 35-54, 55+ are more likely to want to see reduced speed limits (30% 16-17, 25% 55+, 22% 35-54 vs 13% 18-34).

Slowing Down

  • As a passenger, a majority of Canadians say they’ve felt unsafe because of speed (54%) or have in the past asked a driver to slow down (53%). Those aged 35-54 (57%) and 55+ (56%) are more likely to say they’ve asked a driver to slow down than those aged 18-34 (45%).
  • However, while Canadians say that speeding is dangerous, they also indicate that this is something they do. The top-ranking attitude is exceeding the speed limit, with most indicating they’ve exceeded the speed limit on a clear highway in the past year, with over one in ten (14%) indicating they do this frequently. As well, nearly half (48 per cent) of drivers report they’ve been ticketed for speeding.
  • This could be an educational opportunity as Canadians are simultaneously considering an activity dangerous, while engaging in that same action.

(Ipsos Canada)

27 May 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-ca/news-polls/Nearly-All-Canadians-Agree-Everyone-Must-Do-Part-Make-Roads-Safe

 

AUSTRALIA

692-43-18/Poll

Overall Satisfaction With ‘Big 4’ Banks Is Higher Than A Year Ago With CBA & NAB The Top Two

New data from Roy Morgan shows overall 80.5% of customers are satisfied with their bank(s) in April 2021, an increase of 1.3% points on a year ago when the COVID-19 pandemic began.

The increase was built upon increases in satisfaction for building societies (up 3% points on a year ago), foreign banks (up 2.3% points) and Australia’s ‘Big 4’ banks (up 0.3% points).

Satisfaction for the four major banks as a group is 77.1%, up 0.3% points on April 2020, and up 0.2% points on January 2021.

The big improver over the last year has been the NAB which has increased its customer satisfaction by 1.9% points to 78.6% to be just behind the Commonwealth Bank, on 78.8% (down 0.2% points).

Third is ANZ on 75.0% (up 0.6% points on April 2020), followed by Westpac on 73.5% (down 0.4% points).

Among banks as a whole, Beyond Bank scored the highest in April, on 92.7% (up 1.8% points in 12 months). ING was the highest rated foreign bank on 90.6% (up 1.7% points), Newcastle Permanent led the way for building societies on 94.8% (up 3.1% points), while Credit Union Australia was the highest ranked credit union, on 86.9% (up 3.9% points).

The findings, taken from Roy Morgan’s Customer Satisfaction report on Consumer Banking in Australia, reflect the successful way the banking sector responded to financial challenges faced by millions of Australians as a result of the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic. 

‘Big 4’ Bank Customer Satisfaction (2005-2021)

https://www.roymorgan.com/~/media/files/morgan%20poll/2020s/2021/may/8694-c1.png?la=enSource: Roy Morgan Single Source. January 2005 – April 2021, average n = 24,768. Base: Australians 14+.

Roy Morgan CEO, Michele Levine, says a year after COVID-19 up-ended the Australian economy bank satisfaction has emerged higher now than when the pandemic started:

“The month of April 2021 marked just after the one-year anniversary of the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic when many businesses were forced to close during the first nation-wide lockdown which began on March 23, 2020.

“In the year since the nation-wide lockdown began the Federal Government has provided hundreds of billions of dollars of support for the economy, most notably through the JobKeeper wage subsidy scheme, and Australia’s banks seized the opportunity to be good ‘corporate citizens’ by offering financial support to millions of Australians through widespread loan and mortgage deferrals.

“The actions of the banks have been appreciated with overall bank satisfaction in April 2021 at 80.5% - an increase of 1.3% points on a year ago as the pandemic began. Customer satisfaction with the big four banks as a whole has also increased, up 0.3% points to 77.1%, with the Commonwealth Bank being the star performer on 78.8% but the NAB the big improver, up 1.9% points to 78.6% - to be just behind the Commonwealth Bank.

“The end of March marked the end of most of the Government and corporate support for Australians although the expectations are that the Australian economy is on a sufficiently firm footing to continue growing strongly throughout 2021. The vaccine rollout has been widely criticised but over 2 million Australians have already received a vaccine dose.

“The positive expectations for the economy are a hopeful sign for Australia’s banks that their deft and customer-focused handling of the shock of COVID-19 can provide an enduring base to continue increasing customer satisfaction even after the worst of the pandemic has receded.

“We will continue to closely monitor satisfaction levels to see if the sector is able to retain and build on the gains made over the last 12 months.”

(Roy Morgan)

May 25 2021

Source: https://www.roymorgan.com/findings/8694-bank-satisfaction-csa-april-2021-202105250232

 

692-43-19/Poll

New Zealand Labour-Led Government Leads Opposition By 17% In May: 56% cf. 39%

Support for New Zealand’s Labour/Greens government was up 1% point to 56% in May. Support for the Labour Party was up 3.5% points to 45% while support for the Greens dropped 2.5% points to 11%.

The governing parties are now 17% points ahead of the Parliamentary opposition National/Act NZ/ Maori Party on 39%, down 2% points since April. Support for National was down 1% point to 28.5% in May, support for Act NZ was unchanged at 9% and Maori Party support dropped by 1% point to 1.5%.

A small minority of 5% of electors support other minor parties outside Parliament with support for NZ First up 1% point to 2% and The Opportunities Party (TOP) up 1% point to 1.5% in May.

This latest New Zealand Roy Morgan Poll on voting intention was conducted by telephone – both landline and mobile – with a New Zealand-wide cross-section of 932 electors during May. Electors were asked: “If a New Zealand Election were held today which party would receive your party vote?” Of all electors surveyed there were 4% (down 2% points) who didn’t name a party.

New Zealand Government Confidence Rating down slightly to 134 in May

Despite a small decline, the Roy Morgan Government Confidence Rating was at a high 134 in May, down 2pts from 136 in April.

In May an unchanged majority of 62.5% of New Zealand electors said New Zealand was ‘heading in the right direction’ compared to just over a quarter, 28.5% (up 2% points) who said New Zealand was ‘heading in the wrong direction’.

The latest monthly ANZ-Roy Morgan Consumer Confidence Rating was also down slightly in May at 114.0, down 1.4pts from April (115.4) and is now just below the corresponding Consumer Confidence figure in Australia of 114.2 on May 23/24, 2021.

Michele Levine, CEO Roy Morgan, says Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern’s face-to-face meeting with Australian PM Scott Morrison this week is a prime opportunity for the two leaders to discuss several important issues:

“This week the Prime Ministers of New Zealand and Australia are meeting in person in Queenstown on the South Island for the first time since the COVID-19 pandemic began more than a year ago. The meeting is taking place after an outbreak of the virus in Victoria led to New Zealand shutting its borders to the state indefinitely.

“There is no surprise New Zealand decided to shut its borders to Victoria, but the decision does raise questions about when snap border closures between the two countries because of COVID-19 outbreaks can be consigned to history.

“In late May New Zealand has administered over 550,000 doses of COVID-19 vaccines, and fully vaccinated around 5% of the adult population, while Australia has administered over 4 million COVID-19 vaccines and fully vaccinated around 2% of the country’s adult population.

“As the proportion of the adult population that are vaccinated in the two countries increases there should be no need to enforce border closures once certain vaccination thresholds are met. This will provide certainty to businesses, such as tourism and travel businesses, that are relying on the ‘Trans-Tasman Bubble’ remaining open.

“Another important issue is the relationship with China. China is the largest trading partner of both New Zealand and Australia – although there have been significant trade tensions between China and Australia over the last year.

“New Zealand has largely managed to stay out of the dispute between the two countries but there is likely to be significant pressure from Australian PM Scott Morrison to ‘pick a side’ and support the Australian point-of-view in the dispute. This presents a tricky position for the Labour-led Government which would prefer to see the issues resolved amicably as soon as possible.

“Perhaps the most relevant factor is the political positions of the two leaders. Today’s Roy Morgan New Zealand Poll shows the Labour-led Government has the support of 56% of New Zealand electors and recently won a comprehensive election victory.

“In contrast, Australian PM Scott Morrison is facing an election due in the next 12 months and has a very slim majority with 76 seats out of 151 and the latest Morgan Poll on voting intention shows the ALP 50.5% with a narrow two-party preferred lead over the L-NP on 49.5%.”

New Zealand Party Vote: 2020-21

https://www.roymorgan.com/~/media/files/morgan%20poll/2020s/2021/may/8719-c1.png?la=en
Source:
 Roy Morgan New Zealand Single Source. January 2020 – May 2021. Base: New Zealand electors aged 18+. Average interviews per month = 925.

New Zealand Party Vote: NZ Govt. v Parliamentary Opposition

https://www.roymorgan.com/~/media/files/morgan%20poll/2020s/2021/may/8719-c2.png?la=enSource: Roy Morgan New Zealand Single Source. January 2020 – May 2021. Base: New Zealand electors aged 18+. Average interviews per month = 925.

Roy Morgan NZ Government Confidence Rating vs. ANZ-Roy Morgan NZ Consumer Confidence

https://www.roymorgan.com/~/media/files/morgan%20poll/2020s/2021/may/8719-c3.png?la=enSource: Roy Morgan New Zealand Single Source. January 2020 – May 2021. Base: New Zealand electors aged 18+. Average interviews per month = 925.

Voting Intention Summary

The following table compares the latest New Zealand Roy Morgan Polls on Voting Intention with the result from the September 23, 2017 General Election:

PARTY VOTE

Labour

Green Party*

National

ACT NZ

Maori Party**

TOP**

NZ First

Other

ELECTIONS

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

October 12, 1996*

28.19

10.10

33.87

6.10

n/a

n/a

13.35

8.39

November 27, 1999

38.74

5.16

30.50

7.04

n/a

n/a

4.26

14.30

July 27, 2002

41.26

7.00

20.93

7.14

n/a

n/a

10.38

13.29

September 17, 2005

41.10

5.30

39.10

1.51

2.12

n/a

5.72

5.15

November 8, 2008

33.99

6.72

44.93

3.65

2.39

n/a

4.07

4.25

November 26, 2011

27.48

11.06

47.31

1.07

1.43

n/a

6.59

5.06

September 20, 2014  

25.13

10.70

47.04

0.69

1.32

n/a

8.66

6.46

September 23, 2017

36.89

6.27

44.45

0.50

1.18

2.44

7.20

1.07

October 17, 2020

50.01

7.86

25.58

7.59

1.17

1.51

2.60

3.70

ROY MORGAN POLL

January 2020

40

10.5

40

3

1.5

0.5

2.5

2

February 2020

40.5

10.5

37

3.5

1

1.5

5

1

March 2020

42.5

11.5

37

3.5

0.5

1

3

1

April 2020

55

7

30.5

2.5

1.5

0.5

2.5

0.5

May 2020

56.5

7

26.5

3.5

1.5

1

2.5

1.5

June 2020

54.5

9

27

5

1

1.5

1.5

0.5

July 2020

53.5

8

26.5

6.5

0.5

1.5

1.5

2

August 2020

48

11.5

28.5

6

0.5

1

2.5

2

September 2020

47.5

9.5

28.5

7

0.5

1.5

2.5

3

NZ Election 2020

50

7.9

25.6

7.6

1.2

1.5

2.6

3.7

November 2020

44

12.5

25.5

10.5

1

2

1.5

3

December 2020

44

10.5

28

10

2

2

2

1.5

January 2021

47

11.5

25

9

2

1.5

2

2

February 2021

45

13.5

29

7.5

1

1

1.5

1.5

March 2021

45.5

12

23

11

1

2

2.5

3

April 2021

41.5

13.5

29.5

9

2.5

0.5

1

2.5

May 2021

45

11

28.5

9

1.5

1.5

2

1.5

*The 1996 Election was the first New Zealand Election contested via MMP (Mixed Member Proportional). At the 1996 Election the Greens Party contested as part of the “Alliance” political grouping with four other political parties.
**The Maori Party was launched in July 2004. The Opportunities Party (TOP) was launched in November 2016.

Two-Party Preferred: Labour Party-led Government vs. Parliamentary Opposition Parties

Labour Party-led Government

(Labour, Greens)

Parliamentary
Opposition Parties
(National, Act NZ & Maori)

2020

NZ Election, October 17, 2020*

57.87

34.33

ROY MORGAN NEW ZEALAND POLL

Labour wins the NZ Election and, despite securing a majority of seats in Parliament,
signs a ‘Cooperation Agreement’ with the Greens – October 31, 2020

November 2020

56.5

37

December 2020

54.5

40

2021

January 2021

58.5

36

February 2021

58.5

37.5

March 2021

57.5

35

April 2021

55

41

May 2021

56

39


*At the 2020 NZ Election the Labour party secured 50.01% of the vote which was enough to govern in their own right but Labour opted to sign a ‘Cooperation Agreement’ with the Greens, who won 7.86% of the vote. There were three Parties elected to Parliament not in Government led by National (25.58%), Act NZ (7.59%) and the Maori Party (1.17%).

(Roy Morgan)

May 28 2021

Source: https://www.roymorgan.com/findings/8719-nz-national-voting-intention-may-2021-202105280647

 

MULTICOUNTRY STUDIES

692-43-20/Poll

Is Covid-19 Compelling Arab Citizens To Surrender Freedoms To Their Governments

Efforts to control the spread of covid-19 have prompted governments across the Arab World to pursue aggressive strategies — from closing international borders and imposing curfews, to restricting movement between cities and expanding digital surveillance of citizens. Such measures expose not only the tension between public health safeguards and protecting individual civil liberties; rather, they also reveal the threat of opportunistic government overreach under the pretense of the coronavirus.

The sixth wave of Arab Barometer surveys asked citizens across five Arab countries—Algeria, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, and Tunisia—their views on government restrictions of assorted freedoms during a public health emergency. Support for government restrictions on speech and movement, censorship of the media, and monitoring and tracing of citizens varies both across and within countries, as well as by age, gender, and citizens’ levels of trust in the government. Overall, the younger generation are more accepting of restrictions than are their older counterparts, women are more open to government limitations on movement, and those with greater trust in the government show more tolerance of restrictions. However, despite this variation in attitudes, a plurality, and in most cases a clear majority, of respondents consider a range of government restrictions sometimes or even always justified within the context of a public health crisis.

Government Restrictions on Speech, Media, Movement, and Privacy

Free speech and the media are necessary not only for ensuring widespread access to accurate information throughout a public health crisis, but are also important mechanisms to advocate for government accountability. Yet, Arab publics are generally sympathetic to restrictions in both these domains. Though limitations on free speech are the least popular restriction among those asked about in the survey, nonetheless over half of respondents cite some level of support in nearly every country surveyed. Two-thirds of Algerians and Moroccans (66 percent in each) say it is either sometimes or always justifiable for the government to limit freedom of speech during a public health emergency, followed by over half of Jordanians (59 percent) and Tunisians (53 percent) saying the same. Only in Lebanon do fewer than half of respondents cite support for such restrictions to free speech (47 percent). With respect to restrictions on the media, roughly seven-in-ten citizens in Jordan (71 percent), Morocco (70 percent), and Algeria (69 percent), in addition to six-in-ten Tunisians (63 percent), and over half of Lebanese (56 percent) say that government censorship of the media is sometimes or always justifiable during a public health emergency.

An even greater proportion of Arab citizens are supportive of the government limiting freedom of movement and monitoring or tracing citizens’ locations in response to covid-19. Roughly eight-in-ten citizens in Algeria (80 percent), Morocco (79 percent), Tunisia (77 percent), and Jordan (77 percent in each) acknowledge the government should be allowed to limit freedom of movement. Comparable rates (78 percent in Algeria, 74 percent in Morocco and Tunisia, and 72 percent in Jordan) support the government tracking citizens’ locations. Again, in Lebanon, popular support for these restrictions is the lowest among countries surveyed, with 67 percent sympathetic to limiting freedom of movement and 68 percent supporting location monitoring or tracing by the government.

https://www.arabbarometer.org/wp-content/uploads/Q8COVID19_2_Overall.png

https://www.arabbarometer.org/wp-content/uploads/Q8COVID19_3_Overall.png

https://www.arabbarometer.org/wp-content/uploads/Q8COVID19_4_Overall.png

https://www.arabbarometer.org/wp-content/uploads/Q8COVID19_5_Overall.png

Indicators of Support for Government Restrictions: Age, Gender, and Trust

What distinguishes individuals who support such restrictions from those who do not? One of the most salient indicators is age, with younger adults (18-29) more likely to voice support for government limitations than are their older counterparts (60+). This trend holds across all countries and for all restrictions, with the exception of Jordanian and Lebanese youth and restrictions to movement or government tracing, respectively. Though older Jordanians are indeed less likely than the younger generation to support restrictions on speech and media, they are slightly more receptive than younger adults are to restrictions on movement (78 versus 76). The gap is more sizable in Lebanon with respect to government monitoring and tracing of citizens — 80 percent of those 60 or older support such measures, compared to 70 percent of younger adults saying the same. Interestingly, on average, young citizens deviate most from older citizens with respect to censorship of the media, with those aged 18 to 29 showing more openness than those over 60 to the government censoring the media either sometimes or always during a public health crisis. Given that individuals under the age of 25 account for over half of the population across the Middle East and North Africa, their beliefs about the role government should play during crises represent not only the preferences of a significant portion of the region, but also reflect burgeoning trends and attitudes that will influence the region’s future.

https://www.arabbarometer.org/wp-content/uploads/Q8COVID19_2_Age.png

https://www.arabbarometer.org/wp-content/uploads/Q8COVID19_3_Age.png

https://www.arabbarometer.org/wp-content/uploads/Q8COVID19_4_Age.png

https://www.arabbarometer.org/wp-content/uploads/Q8COVID19_5_Age.png

Though gender is not a meaningful indicator of support for restrictions on speech or the media, women are more likely than men to support restrictions to movement and government efforts to trace and monitor citizens. The gap between men and women is starkest for the latter — women in Tunisia and Morocco support government monitoring of citizens’ movement at rates 12 and 11 percentage points higher, respectively, than do men. The gender divide is smaller, though still apparent, in Lebanon (9 percentage points), Jordan (4 percentage points) and Algeria (4 percentage points). Gendered differences with respect to movement and restrictions thereof could explain this discrepancy: Women are already more likely than men to face de jure or de facto restrictions on their movement, thus women may be more accustomed to (and receptive of) curtailments of this sort.

https://www.arabbarometer.org/wp-content/uploads/Q8COVID19_3_Gender.png

https://www.arabbarometer.org/wp-content/uploads/Q8COVID19_5_Gender.png

Finally and perhaps unsurprisingly, those with greater trust in the government are more likely to support government restrictions. On average, the discrepancy between those with higher levels of trust in the government and those with little to no trust in the government is most apparent for restrictions on free speech. Across the countries surveyed, 69 percent of those with a great deal of trust in their government said restrictions on free speech are sometimes or always necessary during a public health crisis, compared to 51 percent of those with little to no trust in their governments saying the same. Distrust in government understandably correlates with a greater discomfort with government curtailment of freedoms.

https://www.arabbarometer.org/wp-content/uploads/Q8COVID19_2_Trust-740x529.png

Looking Ahead

Governments play a critical role in curbing the spread of covid-19 — containing rampant misinformation about the virus, managing testing and vaccination, and ultimately ensuring citizen’s safety and security. But, in a region all too familiar with government corruption and durable authoritarianism, the heavy hand of government during times of crisis can set dangerous precedents. The pandemic will eventually end, but the corrosion to civil liberties could prove more resilient and enduring than the virus itself. In the face of government overreach and restrictions that often have no clear expiration date, citizens of the region must be cautious and vigilant.

(Arabbarometer)

May 24, 2021

Source: https://www.arabbarometer.org/2021/05/is-covid-19-compelling-arab-citizens-to-surrender-freedoms-to-their-governments/

 

692-43-21/Poll

More Than Four In Every 10 (43%) Respondents Reported That Covid-19 Had Made It More Difficult For Them Or Someone In Their Household To Obtain Required Medication In The Previous Three Months 

In many areas people experience a loss of income, and food security is under pressure. In addition, people who need medication for chronic or other illnesses can quite often not acquire the necessary medication, or find it impossible to get to hospitals or clinics.

According to recent calculations of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), Africa will need a total of US $285 billion over the next four years to be able to overcome the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Since the start of the pandemic, Ipsos conducted public opinion polls on behalf of the Partnership for Evidence-Based Response to COVID-19 (PERC), a consortium of global public health organisations and private sector firms1. PERC was created in March 2020 with the objective of providing African Union member states with real-time information and guidance to reduce the impact of Covid-19 on the continent.

Ipsos offices throughout Africa collected data for the different waves of the study by conducting 24,000 telephone surveys in 19 African Union member states for each wave. These interviews were supplemented with weekly social media scraping data.

The third survey in the series was conducted in February 20212 and questions probed the public’s knowledge, risk perceptions, attitudes, access to information, reactions, behaviours and practices related to Covid-19. Findings show that the Covid-19 pandemic continues to impact societies, not only in terms of health, but also regarding the local social and economic conditions and day-to-day life3.

Since the start of the pandemic, Ipsos conducted public opinion polls on behalf of the Partnership for Evidence-Based Response to COVID-19 (PERC), a consortium of global public health organisations and private sector firms.   PERC was created in March 2020 with the objective of providing African Union member states with real-time information and guidance to reduce the impact of Covid-19 on the continent

Some Key Findings regarding healthcare, income and food security from the third report:

  • More than four in every 10 (43%) respondents reported that Covid-19 had made it more difficult for them or someone in their household to obtain required medication in the previous three months (between November 2020 and February 2021).
  • Among respondents that reported they, or someone in their household required a health care visit, almost a quarter (23%) reported missing or skipping services since November 2020 and more than four in 10 (42%) missed or skipped services since the start of the pandemic.
  • Income loss has increased, exacerbating issues like accessing food and health care services – a crisis that is worsening as the pandemic continues. More than three quarters of all respondents (77%) reported losing some or all of their income since the start of the pandemic. And more than 80% of respondents reported challenges accessing food in the previous week, an increase of 8 percentage points since August 2020.

Mask wearing:

  • The standard Covid-19 self-care messages of “wear a mask covering your nose and mouth”, “maintain a safe distance from others” and “wash your hands often with soap and water” were repeated so often since March 2020, that some might think measuring adherence to these (fairly) simple messages obsolete. However, these are still some of the best defence mechanisms for individuals, reiterated often by epidemiologists and the WHO.
  • Respondents were asked to self-report on some of their behaviour, like hand washing, keeping their distance and wearing a face mask in public when near others. Self-reported mask use remained high in Africa (looking at the previous studies) but varied a lot by country.
  • Interestingly, it is definitely on the low side in the two most populous African countries, namely Nigeria (57%) and Ethiopia (56%).
  • However, Nigeria’s neighbouring country, Cameroon, is reporting the lowest compliance with mask wearing – as only a third (35%) of the population who can be reached by telephone indicated that they have worn a mask in the preceding seven days before the survey.
  • Cameroon is an exception to the rule, as more than half in all the other countries indicated that they do wear masks in public. (It might be worthwhile probing the circumstances in Cameroon keeping mask-wearing at such a low level.)

Interestingly, it is definitely on the low side in the two most populous African countries, namely Nigeria (57%) and Ethiopia (56%) However, Nigerias neighbouring country, Cameroon, is reporting the lowest compliance with mask wearing – as only a third (35%) of the population who can be reached by telephone indicated that they have worn a mask in the preceding seven days before the survey

Possible vaccine acceptance

  • Overall, two-thirds of respondents (67%) reported interest in taking a vaccine when it becomes available, with substantial variation among the countries included (ranging from 91% in Morocco to 35% in Tunisia and Cameroon).
  • Interestingly, Cameroon is again one of the countries reporting the lowest vaccine acceptance figures on the continent.
  • However, the African Health authorities and Governments still have a big job to do in most countries to disseminate information about being vaccinated against Covid-19.
  • Various other studies conducted by Ipsos and other agencies pointed to the fact that many people are scared of the possible side-effects of the Covid-19 vaccine. These should be openly discussed by authorities.
  • Another issue might be the spread of bogus information and scare tactics – especially on social media. Again, widespread, and honest information is the best way to deal with fake news.
  • Other Ipsos projects have pointed out that, as soon as a vaccine becomes available in a country, and populations are being vaccinated in growing numbers, vaccine hesitancy becomes less pronounced. This was the case in both the UK and the USA and it would be very interesting to see if Africa follows this trend. One of the biggest issues, however, is that vaccine availability in most African countries is still very low.

Other Ipsos projects have pointed out that, as soon as a vaccine becomes available in a country, and populations are being vaccinated in growing numbers, vaccine hesitancy becomes less pronounced. This was the case in both the UK and the USA and it would be very interesting to see if Africa follows this trend. One of the biggest issues, however, is that vaccine availability in most African countries is still very low

Perceptions of the role of government

  • There is speculation and some empirical evidence that Covid-19 risk perception and satisfaction with the government’s Covid-19 response are important factors influencing a respondent’s intent to get vaccinated.
  • Although this is true in Morocco where 88% are satisfied with their government’s response to Covid-19 pandemic and 91% want to be vaccinated. In Tunisia, only 46% are happy with their government’s response and only 35% want to be vaccinated. But a lot more work needs to be done in this area.

There is speculation and some empirical evidence that Covid-19 risk perception and satisfaction with the governments Covid-19 response are important factors influencing a respondents intent to get vaccinated

(Ipsos South Africa)

24 May 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-za/africa-day-african-perspective-covid-19

 

692-43-22/Poll

Two In Five Drivers Based In The UAE, In Great Britain (5%) And Germany, (9%) Plan To Buy A New Car In The Next 12 Months

With some economies gathering steam, the auto industry will be looking to make good on the shortfall in sales that it saw in 2020. But how big is demand and what do motorists’ budgets and intentions look like in 2021?

When it comes to buying a car, the intent varies heavily from market to market. A look at five key countries in YouGov Profiles – Australia, Germany, Great Britain, the UAE, and the US – shows that the proportion looking to purchase a vehicle can still be either significant, weak, or somewhere in-between. Two in five drivers based in the UAE, for example, plan to buy a new car in the next 12 months; in Great Britain (5%) and Germany, (9%), the proportion is fewer than one in ten and demand much weaker.

It’s a similar story when it comes to buying used vehicles. Almost a quarter of the UAE  drivers want to buy a second hand car (23%) in the next 12 months, and nearly as many Australians (19%) say the same. But, again, in Britain (8%) and Germany (7%) demand is much weaker – something which in itself will have a knock-on effect on the proportion of consumers in the market for a model fresh off the production line.

In fact, for Britons, making savings in their motoring budget may be more of a priority than spending on a new car.  Some 16% plan to change their car insurance provider in the next year, compared to 10% of Emirati drivers, 8% of Germans, 7% of Australians, and just 5% of Americans. They’re also much more likely to switch their breakdown cover (GB 8%; UAE 3%; US 2%; 1% Australia; 1% Germany). When compared against other nations, it paints either an unflattering picture of the British car insurance market or a describes a nation that shops around when it comes to motoring costs. This may have much to do with the relative ease of switching car insurance compared to other markets.

The leasing and finance market for cars varies from market to market. Fewer than one in ten drivers intend to lease a car in the next year across the globe but there are markets which are more icnlined towards this type of car ownership. Again, it’s consumers in the UAE with the highest appetite for a new car via leasing – 7% of them plan to get a car this way in the next 12 months. The US comes second, at 6%, while demand for a leased vehicle is currently slacker in GB (4%), Germany (4%) and Australia (2%).

However, when we look at purchase history in Britain, it’s not altogether surprising that leasing is a not a popular current option. Half of drivers (49%) bought their cars with cash, one in five (20%) used dealer financing, 14% traded in their old car, one in ten used a personal loan (9%), and just 5% leased it.

(YouGov UK)

May 27, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/transport/articles-reports/2021/05/27/where-demand-new-cars-strongest-and-how-are-motori

 

692-43-23/Poll

 Globally (54%) Still Prefer In-Store Shopping To Online Purchases (38%)

According to a recent survey by YouGov, more than half of consumers in 17 global markets (54%) still prefer in-store shopping to online purchases (38%) - yet tthe pandemic has undoubtedly changed how the world shops. 

A recently released white paper by YouGov on fast-moving consumer goods quantifies the global population’s shift from in-store purchases to online transactions in areas as wide as clothing, personal care products, groceries, and medicines. But data we reveal today shows a similar trend can be found in another area of shopping - specifically mobile phone purchases. New figures from YouGov show that in most of the markets we polled (11 out of 17), consumers prefer shopping online for mobile phones to an in-store experience.  

India tops the list as the country with the highest proportion of consumers who have bought a mobile online in the past three months – 12% of Indians have done so compared to 10% who have done so in a physical store. But it is in other countries that the difference is more pronounced. In the UK and Germany, shoppers have been much more likely to purchase handsets online, rather than in-store – but that is probably because of the markets’ significant lockdowns.  

In other markets, though, the in-store experience remains king. In Indonesia, for example, 8% of shoppers have bought a phone in-store, compared to just one in twenty (5%) who have done so in-store. In UAE, the differential is similar – 12% vs. 8%.  

Consumers in the US are divided, with the same proportion (9%) having bought online as in-store over the last quarter. Other countries where there is no significant difference between the percentage of adults that chose online vs in-store are Poland, Italy, China, Sweden, France, and Denmark. 

As our white paper reveals, physical experience of the product is the primary reason for six in ten people globally to go to bricks and mortar retail stores. The primary reason for choosing online shopping? Six in ten (57%) people globally prefer online shopping thanks to the convenience of home delivery.  

(YouGov UK)

May 28, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/consumer/articles-reports/2021/05/28/place-people-buy-mobile-phones-changing