BUSINESS & POLITICS IN THE WORLD

 

GLOBAL OPINION REPORT NO. 695-696

 

 

Week: June 14 –June 27, 2021

 

Presentation: July 05, 2021

 

 

Contents

 

695-696-43-45/Commentary: 69% Americans Are Most Likely To Indicate They Will Currently Still Wear A Mask On Airplanes Or Trains. 4

SUMMARY OF POLLS. 6

ASIA   16

Among White-Collar Employees, The Remote Working Practice, Which Was 13% Before The Epidemic, Has Now Reached 59% In Turkey. 16

16% Pakistanis Claim To Have Bought Something Online During The Past 6 Months. 20

AFRICA.. 20

88 Percent Of Nigerians Believe That Child Labor Is Prevalent In Nigeria While 12 Percent Mentioned That It Is Not Prevalent 21

3 In Ten (27%) Adult South Africans And Four In Ten (37%) Young People In The Country Are Looking For Work; Youth Day 2021. 29

Awareness Levels Of The New RTR Guidelines Amongst Consumers Is Quite Low 17% In South Africa. 32

More Than Half 63% Of The Owners Of Small, Medium And Micro Enterprises (SMME’s) Saying They Experienced Great Uncertainty Regarding The Sustainability Of Their Businesses. 35

81% Zimbabweans Strongly Agree With The Fact That Even If The Lockdown Had Negative Impacts But It Was Necessary. 38

WEST EUROPE.. 39

Only 6% Of Brits Think Increasing House Prices Would Be Beneficial For The Country, But One-Fifth (20%) Say It Would Be Advantageous For Their Personal Finances. 39

Three In Ten (31% Of 18-34’s) Football Fans Say Live TV Is A Thing Of The Past (Compared To 20% Of Over 35s) 41

Britons Will Miss Practicing Better Hygiene (66%), Less Traffic On Roads At Peak Times (63%) And Quiet Shops And Supermarkets (59%) 43

4 In 10 (44%) Britons Believe That There Are Still Many Important Issues To Finalise With The EU.. 46

Around Two In Five (63%) Of The Unvaccinated Are Convinced By Arguments Which Say There Hasn’t Been Enough Time To See What The Side-Effects Of The Vaccine Might Be. 48

One In Twelve Parents Say They Regret Having Children. 49

Despite General Hesitancy For Loosening Restrictions, 61% Of The Public Support Lifting The Limit Of 30 Attendees In Weddings. 52

Around 13,000 People In Germany Develop Blood Cancer Every Year, For Which A Stem Cell Donation Is Often The Last Chance Of A Cure. 53

Nearly Half (48%) Of People Who Regularly Shop Online Would Use “Buy Now, Pay Later” Service If It Were Available. 55

Since 2018, Internet Sales Are Twice As Popular (Going From 11% To 22%) - Particularly By Women (28%) And Young People (39% Of 25-34 Year Olds) 56

1 In 5 Spaniards Will Continue To Use The Mask Despite Not Being Mandatory. 57

NORTH AMERICA.. 58

69% Americans Are Most Likely To Indicate They Will Currently Still Wear A Mask On Airplanes Or Trains. 59

About One-Third (32%) Of The Posts On Conservative Facebook Pages And Roughly Half (52%) On Liberal Pages Were Neither Positive Nor Negative. 60

Roughly Two-Thirds Of Atheists (65%) And Six-In-Ten Agnostics (57%) Either “Strongly” Or “Somewhat” Oppose The Death Penalty For People Convicted Of Murder 71

Americans Lost More Years (5.5 Million) Of Life To Covid-19 In 2020 Than To All Accidents Combined In A Typical Year 74

The Percentage Of Americans Who Believe That Religion Is Increasing Its Influence On American Life Has Retreated To 16%, In Line With Pre-Pandemic Levels. 77

45% Of Gen Z Adults And 40% Of Millennials Have Interacted With Content On Social Platforms That Focuses On The Need For Action On Climate Change. 79

About Four-In-Ten Adults With Lower Incomes Do Not Have Home Broadband Services (43%) Or A Desktop Or Laptop Computer (41%) 83

Nearly Nine-In-Ten U.S. Adults Who Were Raised Jewish (88%) Are Still Jewish Today. 85

About Six-In-Ten U.S Adults (63%) Have A “Very” Or “Mostly” Favorable Opinion Of Pope Francis. 89

The Housing Crisis In Canada: Three-Quarters (75%) Of Canadians Who Don’t Own A Home But Want To Buy One, Say They Can’t Afford To. 91

Eight In Ten (82%) Canadians Vaccinated Or Awaiting Vaccine; Remaining 18% Need To Be Convinced. 92

Half (51%) Of Canadians Anxious About Returning To Normal Life Following The Pandemic, Though Cautious Optimism Evident 95

One Quarter Of Canadians (26%) Are Not Confident That Their Family Would Be Able To Pay For Mortgage/Rent/Housing Costs, If They Were To Pass Away. 97

AUSTRALIA.. 97

Over 2 Million Australians Are Now Reading Puzzle Magazines – Up An Exceptional 492,000 (+30.8%) From A Year Ago. 97

ALP (50.5%) Leads L-NP (49.5%) On A Two-Party Preferred Basis – No Bounce For Pm From G7 Trip. 100

In The 12 Months To March 2021 A Fast-Rising 38.8% Of Australians Agree That ‘Credit Enables Me To Buy The Things I Want’ – An Increase Of 12.4% Points From A Year Ago Pre-Covid-19. 103

60% Of Australians Believe That Giving Aid To Developing Nations Is Good For Australia, Compared With 21% Who Believe That It Makes No Difference. 106

MULTICOUNTRY STUDIES. 107

Among 17 Advanced Economies A Median Of 22% Say They Have Confidence In Putin To Do The Right Thing In World Affairs, Compared With A Median Of 74% Who Say They Have No Such Confidence. 107

People In The Nordics Are Mostly Into City Breaks i.e. Short Holidays Spent In A City, With An Average Of 42 % People Choosing This Type Of Holiday (Ranging From 35 % Of Swedes To 46 % Of Finns) 111

3 In 4 Britons Believe In The Right To Seek Refuge, But 2 In 5 Want To Shut Borders Completely At This Time. 113

Canadians Agree (72%) People Should Be Able To Seek Refuge From War And Persecution, But Few (10%) Like The Idea Of Letting In More Refugees Post-Pandemic. 114

Three In Five Urban Indians Would Watch More Of Women’s Sport If It Was More Accessible On TV YouGov. 115

In Five Of Seven MENA States At Least 40 Percent Have A Favorable View Of France Overall 119

In 17 Countries Only 8% Of Respondents (Gamers And Non-Gamers) Would Describe Video Games As Inclusive. 121

In Many Markets Such As Spain, Mexico And China, The Ratio Of People Who Prefer Hybrids To Electrics Is Around 2:1. 122

Global Country Average Of 74% Say There Is At Least A Fair Amount Of Tension Between Rich And Poor 123

 


 

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

 

This weekly report consists of forty four surveys. The report includes nine multi-country studies from different states across the globe.

 

695-696-43-45/Commentary: 69% Americans Are Most Likely To Indicate They Will Currently Still Wear A Mask On Airplanes Or Trains

We explored where Americans will continue to wear masks, and whether they assume that people wearing a mask have not been vaccinated. The questions about mask-wearing were only asked to Americans because a greater proportion of the American population is currently fully vaccinated. With second doses of COVID-19 vaccines being available earlier in certain provinces, we also explored Canadians’ perspectives on receiving a second dose.

This survey is conducted in collaboration with the Association for Canadian Studies (ACS) and published in the Canadian Press. This series of surveys is available on Leger’s website


THE FUTURE OF WEARING A MASK IN THE UNITED STATES

  • Americans are most likely to indicate they will currently still wear a mask on airplanes or trains (69%), at large stores (grocery, general goods, etc.) (65%) and/or in small stores (convenience stores, etc.) (62%).
  • More than three-in-ten Americans who still wear a mask on airplanes/trains, at large stores, at small stores, at sporting events or concerts, and/or at bars/restaurants think they will not stop wearing a mask at/in each of these until 2022.
  • 19% of Americans assume that if they see someone wearing a mask, that person has not been vaccinated.

https://2g2ckk18vixp3neolz4b6605-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Future-of-Wearing-Masks-in-the-United-States_EN_2021-06-15-1024x1024.jpg

RECEIVING A SECOND DOSE OF ASTRAZENECA

  • 50% of Canadians who received a first dose of AstraZeneca would prefer to get a second dose of AstraZeneca, 32% would prefer getting a second dose of another brand of vaccine, and 18% don’t know what they would prefer.

Second Dose Preferences

(Leger)        

June 15th, 2021

Source: https://leger360.com/surveys/legers-north-american-tracker-june-15-2021/

 

695-696-43-46/Country Profile:

SUMMARY OF POLLS

ASIA

(Turkey)

Among White-Collar Employees, The Remote Working Practice, Which Was 13% Before The Epidemic, Has Now Reached 59% In Turkey

According to the data we gathered from white-collar employees, the remote working practice, which was 13% before the epidemic, has now reached 59%. In multinational companies or operating in different fields, we see that remote working has increased from 21% to 94%. Decisions were made on which teams would come to the office, which teams would work remotely, applications for those with chronic diseases, performance system adaptations, working hours and how internal communication activities would be carried out.

(Ipsos Turkey)

21 June 2021

(Pakistan)

16% Pakistanis Claim To Have Bought Something Online During The Past 6 Months

According to a survey conducted by Gallup & Gilani Pakistan, 16% Pakistanis claimed to have shopped online during the past 6 months.  A nationally representative sample of adult men and women from across the four provinces was asked the following question, “Have you done any online shopping during the past six months i.e. did you buy any thing/product online?” In response to this question, 16% said ‘Yes’, 82% said ‘No’ while 2% did not know/did not respond.  

(Gallup Pakistan)

June 23, 2021

AFRICA

(Nigeria)

88 Percent Of Nigerians Believe That Child Labor Is Prevalent In Nigeria While 12 Percent Mentioned That It Is Not Prevalent

To commemorate the Child Labour Day, NOIPolls conducted a survey to gauge the opinion of Nigerians on child labour and the result revealed that 88 percent of Nigerians believe that child labour is prevalent in Nigeria while 12 percent mentioned that it is not prevalent. This further corroborates the findings of the International Labour Organisation (ILO) which states that there are 152 million children in the whole world engaged in child labour while there are 15 million children undergoing different forms of child labour in Nigeria which is the highest in West Africa[3].

(NOI Polls)

June 16, 2021

(South Africa)

3 In Ten (27%) Adult South Africans And Four In Ten (37%) Young People In The Country Are Looking For Work; Youth Day 2021

Figures from Statistics South Africa confirmed that the Youth unemployment rate in South Africa increased to 63.3% in the first quarter of 2021 from 63.2% in the fourth quarter of 2020. By no means do we want to underplay the dire need for job creation in our country, as roughly 3 in ten (27%) adult South Africans and four in ten (37%) young people in the country are looking for work. The frightening high figure of youth unemployment needs some unpacking.

(Ipsos South Africa)

16 June 2021

Awareness Levels Of The New RTR Guidelines Amongst Consumers Is Quite Low 17% In South Africa

The current awareness levels of the new RTR guidelines amongst consumers are low - with only 17% of respondents saying they have heard of it and have a good grasp or thorough knowledge of what the new guidelines entail. The main advantages for consumers relate to “freedom of choice” when choosing which warranty and/or maintenance plan to purchase. This allows them to “shop around” and decide on where to service or repair their vehicles. Further to this, 50% of consumers feel that RTR will financially benefit them.

(Ipsos South Africa)

17 June 2021

More Than Half 63% Of The Owners Of Small, Medium And Micro Enterprises (SMME’s) Saying They Experienced Great Uncertainty Regarding The Sustainability Of Their Businesses

The impact of the pandemic and subsequent lockdown on business performance have been significant, with 63% of SMME’s stating that they are performing “Not Well” or “Not Very Well” after lockdown, while larger enterprises are seemingly more resilient, with a third (35%) stating that they are still performing “Well” or “Very Well” after lockdown.

(Ipsos South Africa)

27 June 2021

(Zimbabwe)

81% Zimbabweans Strongly Agree With The Fact That Even If The Lockdown Had Negative Impacts But It Was Necessary

A new Afrobarometer survey shows that even though almost half of Zimbabwean households lost a primary source of income during the COVID-19 pandemic, most citizens approve of the government’s overall management of the pandemic. Most Zimbabweans endorse lockdowns and school closures as painful but necessary.

(Afrobarometer)

17 Jun 2021

WEST EUROPE

(UK)

Only 6% Of Brits Think Increasing House Prices Would Be Beneficial For The Country, But One-Fifth (20%) Say It Would Be Advantageous For Their Personal Finances 

Most recent figures show that the housing market is growing at its fastest rate in seven years – a jump of 9.5% in the year to May. Experts suggest that ‘market activity continues to be boosted by the government’s stamp duty holiday’ and that this boom period may continue as the ‘unexpected savers’ of the pandemic look to invest their extra money. Now, new YouGov tracking data shows that 58% of Brits expect prices of homes to go up in the year ahead while 21% expect them to stay about the same, and only 6% anticipate a dip.

(YouGov UK)

June 14, 2021

Three In Ten (31% Of 18-34’s) Football Fans Say Live TV Is A Thing Of The Past (Compared To 20% Of Over 35s)

Comparing football fans aged 18-34 and over-35s reveals key differences in viewing preferences. While TV is still the most popular way to watch the game, older fans are more likely to turn on the telly to watch live football (87% vs. 82% of 18-34s) and highlights (67% vs. 61% of 18-34s). 

(YouGov UK)

June 17, 2021

Britons Will Miss Practicing Better Hygiene (66%), Less Traffic On Roads At Peak Times (63%) And Quiet Shops And Supermarkets (59%)

New polling by Ipsos MORI shows that while many will be ready to see the end of lockdown, there are plenty of aspects of lockdown that will be missed. Among the things most likely to be looked back on fondly are people practising better hygiene with two-thirds saying they will miss this at least a fair amount (66%), less traffic on roads at peak times (63%) and quiet shops and supermarkets (59%). 

(Ipsos MORI)

20 June 2021

4 In 10 (44%) Britons Believe That There Are Still Many Important Issues To Finalise With The EU

New polling by Ipsos MORI, in partnership with UK in a Changing Europe, finds that 4 in 10 (44%) Britons believe that there are still many important issues to finalise with the EU, with Remain voters most likely to feel this way about negotiations (62%).  In contrast, 30% of leave voters say there are still many important issues to discuss.

(Ipsos MORI)

23 June 2021

Around Two In Five (63%) Of The Unvaccinated Are Convinced By Arguments Which Say There Hasn’t Been Enough Time To See What The Side-Effects Of The Vaccine Might Be

Before the vaccine roll-out began late last year, the majority of Britons were convinced by the argument that there had not been enough time to see the side-effects of the vaccine – now just two in five (41%) think the same, down 20ppt.  Similarly, only three in ten (31%) are convinced by the argument that vaccine doses will be limited, and others will need them more, 20ppt fewer than last November.

(Ipsos MORI)

24 June 2021

One In Twelve Parents Say They Regret Having Children

YouGov data shows that while the vast majority of parents (83%) insist they’ve never felt this way, a small number admit to it. One in twelve parents (8%) say they regret having children, while another 6% have previously had regrets but don’t now. While there’s no difference between mothers and fathers, younger parents aged 25 to 34 are the most likely to feel regretful, with one in five either rueing their choice (13%) or having done so (9%).

(YouGov UK)

June 24, 2021

Despite General Hesitancy For Loosening Restrictions, 61% Of The Public Support Lifting The Limit Of 30 Attendees In Weddings

Despite general hesitancy for loosening restrictions, 61% of the public support lifting the limit of 30 attendees. Perhaps unsurprisingly, three quarters (74%) of those who are attending a wedding in the next month support the measure, compared to 60% of people who will not be affected by the rule change. Despite the delay to the roadmap, the government has stated that the furlough scheme will be phased out from 1 July as planned. Through the pandemic, furloughed workers have had 80% of their wage paid by the government

(YouGov UK)

June 24, 2021

(Germany)

Around 13,000 People In Germany Develop Blood Cancer Every Year, For Which A Stem Cell Donation Is Often The Last Chance Of A Cure

In addition to the 22 percent who are already entered in a stem cell donor register or have even donated stem cells, another 40 percent of those questioned are potential donors. One in ten (10%) is already determined to register, almost one in three (30%) is “perhaps ready”. Among the 18- to 34-year-olds, one in four (25%) is already registered and, at 17 percent, a clearly above-average proportion decided to register. Another 28 percent may be willing to donate stem cells. The potential for potential donors is particularly high among younger adults. 

(Ipsos Germany)

June 24, 2021

(Italy)

Nearly Half (48%) Of People Who Regularly Shop Online Would Use “Buy Now, Pay Later” Service If It Were Available

Italians are receptive to this idea. In fact, nearly half (48%) of people who regularly shop online would use such a service if it were available. However, the new services are not yet well known: at the moment in Italy there are three brands that offer this service, and knowledge of all of them is still very limited: these are Scalapay (11%), Klarna (5%) and Afterpay (3%)

(YouGov Italy)

June 14, 2021

(France)

Since 2018, Internet Sales Are Twice As Popular (Going From 11% To 22%) - Particularly By Women (28%) And Young People (39% Of 25-34 Year Olds)

Donations to associations come first (39%), followed by internet sales (22%) and donations to people around them (14%). Since 2018, internet sales are twice as popular (going from 11% to 22%) - particularly by women (28%) and young people (39% of 25-34 year olds). Note: 12% of respondents say they leave things they no longer carry in their closet (-4 points since 2018) and 7% throw them in the trash.

(YouGov France)

June 14, 2021

(Spain)

1 In 5 Spaniards Will Continue To Use The Mask Despite Not Being Mandatory

Next Saturday one of the Covid-19 sanitary measures that generated the most controversy from the beginning and that, in turn, most bothered many will be modified: the mandatory use of masks outdoors . Although the specific details are not yet known, starting next Saturday, June 26, Spaniards will be able to walk through the streets, beaches and mountains without having to use a complement that was already part of everyone's routine. 

(Ipsos Spain)

June 22, 2021

NORTH AMERICA

(USA)

69% Americans Are Most Likely To Indicate They Will Currently Still Wear A Mask On Airplanes Or Trains

Americans are most likely to indicate they will currently still wear a mask on airplanes or trains (69%), at large stores (grocery, general goods, etc.) (65%) and/or in small stores (convenience stores, etc.) (62%). More than three-in-ten Americans who still wear a mask on airplanes/trains, at large stores, at small stores, at sporting events or concerts, and/or at bars/restaurants think they will not stop wearing a mask at/in each of these until 2022.

(Leger)        

June 15th, 2021

About One-Third (32%) Of The Posts On Conservative Facebook Pages And Roughly Half (52%) On Liberal Pages Were Neither Positive Nor Negative

Among popular Facebook pages that describe themselves as conservative (12 of the 25 pages studied), 1% of posts carried positive assessments of the Biden administration, while 67% were negative. For those pages that self-identified as liberal (11 of the 25), only 1% of the posts carried negative assessments while 47% had a positive one. About one-third (32%) of the posts on conservative Facebook pages and roughly half (52%) on liberal pages were neither positive nor negative.2

(PEW)

JUNE 14, 2021

Roughly Two-Thirds Of Atheists (65%) And Six-In-Ten Agnostics (57%) Either “Strongly” Or “Somewhat” Oppose The Death Penalty For People Convicted Of Murder

Roughly two-thirds of atheists (65%) and six-in-ten agnostics (57%) either “strongly” or “somewhat” oppose the death penalty for people convicted of murder. Atheists and agnostics are small religious groups, representing less than 10% of the adult population, but their share has grown in recent years. Meanwhile, 60% of U.S. adults overall favor the death penalty, including 75% of White evangelical Protestants and 73% of White non-evangelical Protestants, according to the survey, which was conducted in early April. White Protestants account for about 29% of the U.S. population, a share that has shrunk in recent years.

(PEW)

JUNE 15, 2021

Americans Lost More Years (5.5 Million) Of Life To Covid-19 In 2020 Than To All Accidents Combined In A Typical Year

Average life spans change with age as common causes of death shift over time. By the time a U.S. adult lives to 65, they are unlikely to die from some common causes of death among younger people, such as homicide, pregnancy complications or congenital diseases. At the same time, older Americans are more likely than their younger counterparts to die from causes including heart disease, Alzheimer’s – and now COVID-19.

(PEW)

JUNE 16, 2021

The Percentage Of Americans Who Believe That Religion Is Increasing Its Influence On American Life Has Retreated To 16%, In Line With Pre-Pandemic Levels

After doubling last spring and staying elevated in December, the percentage of Americans who believe that religion is increasing its influence on American life has retreated to 16%, in line with pre-pandemic levels. Line graph. Sixteen percent of U.S. adults say religion is increasing its influence on American life, down from 38% in May 2020 and 27% in December 2020. In late 2018 and late 2019, a consistent 19% said religion was increasing its influence.

(Gallup USA)

JUNE 21, 2021

45% Of Gen Z Adults And 40% Of Millennials Have Interacted With Content On Social Platforms That Focuses On The Need For Action On Climate Change

Among U.S. social media users, 45% of Gen Z adults and 40% of Millennials have interacted with content on social platforms that focuses on the need for action on climate change by following an account, liking or commenting on a post, or posting or sharing content about the need for action on climate change. By contrast, much smaller shares of Gen X (27%) and Baby Boomer and older social media users (21%) have engaged with content about climate change in any of these ways.

(PEW)

JUNE 21, 2021

About Four-In-Ten Adults With Lower Incomes Do Not Have Home Broadband Services (43%) Or A Desktop Or Laptop Computer (41%)

Roughly a quarter of adults with household incomes below $30,000 a year (24%) say they don’t own a smartphone. About four-in-ten adults with lower incomes do not have home broadband services (43%) or a desktop or laptop computer (41%). And a majority of Americans with lower incomes are not tablet owners. By comparison, each of these technologies is nearly ubiquitous among adults in households earning $100,000 or more a year.

(PEW)

JUNE 22, 2021

Nearly Nine-In-Ten U.S. Adults Who Were Raised Jewish (88%) Are Still Jewish Today

Overall, nearly nine-in-ten U.S. adults who were raised Jewish (88%) are still Jewish today. This includes 70% who identify with the Jewish religion and 18% who don’t identify with any religion but who consider themselves Jewish in some other way, such as culturally, ethnically or by family background.

(PEW)

JUNE 22, 2021

About Six-In-Ten U.S Adults (63%) Have A “Very” Or “Mostly” Favorable Opinion Of Pope Francis

About six-in-ten U.S adults (63%) have a “very” or “mostly” favorable opinion of Pope Francis, according to a Pew Research Center survey conducted in March using the Center’s online American Trends Panel. This is nearly identical to the share of adults who had a favorable view of Francis in February 2020 (64%). The pope’s favorability also has remained steady among U.S. Catholics, with 82% of Catholics in both the March 2021 and February 2020 surveys saying they have a favorable opinion of the pope.

(PEW)

JUNE 25, 2021

(Canada)

The Housing Crisis In Canada: Three-Quarters (75%) Of Canadians Who Don’t Own A Home But Want To Buy One, Say They Can’t Afford To

A new Ipsos poll conducted on behalf of Manulife Bank reveals that there might be an affordability crisis in Canada, with many struggling to keep up with the cost of living or admitting that home ownership has become a pipe dream for them. The situation has developed into a tragedy for many prospective homeowners, as three-quarters (75%) of those who do not own a home but want to buy one feel like they can’t afford to do so. What’s more, most (71%) of those who do not own a home worry about saving up for one, including four in ten (39%) who worry a lot about this.

(Ipsos Canada)

17 June 2021

Eight In Ten (82%) Canadians Vaccinated Or Awaiting Vaccine; Remaining 18% Need To Be Convinced

The poll found that nearly three-quarters (73%) of Canadian adults say they have received at least one dose of a vaccine and another 10% say that they would like to be vaccinated. With the most recent data from the Government of Canada indicating that 70% of those aged 12 years and older have received at least one dose,[1] these findings are in line with overall population trends.

(Ipsos Canada)

18 June 2021

Half (51%) Of Canadians Anxious About Returning To Normal Life Following The Pandemic, Though Cautious Optimism Evident

A recent Ipsos poll on conducted on behalf of Global News finds that half (51%) of Canadians feel nervous about resuming normal activities post-pandemic, and a third (35%) feel their province is re-opening too quickly, suggesting that there may be a ways to go before we truly feel “normal” again, and mixed feelings when it comes to changes many may have been looking forward to for over a year.

(Ipsos Canada)

19 June 2021

One Quarter Of Canadians (26%) Are Not Confident That Their Family Would Be Able To Pay For Mortgage/Rent/Housing Costs, If They Were To Pass Away

Over the course of the pandemic, Canadians admit they are having more frequent conversations about important topics. According to a recent survey study done by Ipsos, over half of Canadian parents (56%) are having more frequent conversations about their children’s future. Additional conversations include concerns about finances/financial goals/debt (38%), and family’s financial security if they were to pass away (28%).

(Ipsos Canada)

22 June 2021

AUSTRALIA

Over 2 Million Australians Are Now Reading Puzzle Magazines – Up An Exceptional 492,000 (+30.8%) From A Year Ago

Women are the most avid readers of puzzle magazines – now read by 1,268,000 women, up 173,000 (+15.8%) from a year ago. However, readership of puzzle magazines by men has increased far faster and is up by 320,000 (+63.5%) to 824,000. There has also been growth among Gen X with 349,000 now reading Puzzle Magazines, up 53,000 (+17.8%) from a year ago, but older generations have not seen growth over the last year.

(Roy Morgan)

June 21 2021

ALP (50.5%) Leads L-NP (49.5%) On A Two-Party Preferred Basis – No Bounce For Pm From G7 Trip

If a Federal Election were held now it would be too close to call with a higher than usual 7.5% of electors undecided about who they would vote for and with the real possibility Australia would have a hung Parliament for the first time in nearly a decade. Normally around 3-4% of electors can’t say who they would vote for.

(Roy Morgan)

June 23 2021

In The 12 Months To March 2021 A Fast-Rising 38.8% Of Australians Agree That ‘Credit Enables Me To Buy The Things I Want’ – An Increase Of 12.4% Points From A Year Ago Pre-Covid-19

In the 12 months to March 2021 a fast-rising 38.8% of Australians agree that ‘Credit enables me to buy the things I want’ – an increase of 12.4% points from a year ago pre-COVID-19. This is the largest increase for any of the financial attitudes covered here and suggests the long-term decline in usage of credit is being reversed as alternative payment systems such as Zip and Afterpay enter the market.

(Roy Morgan)

June 25 2021

60% Of Australians Believe That Giving Aid To Developing Nations Is Good For Australia, Compared With 21% Who Believe That It Makes No Difference

Data collected by YouGov, the international data and polling company, shows that Australians are inclined to think that sending aid to developing nations is good for their country. 60% of Australians believe that giving aid to developing nations is ‘good for Australia’, compared with 21% who believe that it ‘makes no difference’, and just 12% that hold the opposite opinion that such aid is ‘bad for Australia’. In turn, only half the British feel this way, and a quarter thinks it makes no difference.

(YouGov Australia)

June 23, 2021

MULTICOUNTRY STUDIES

Among 17 Advanced Economies A Median Of 22% Say They Have Confidence In Putin To Do The Right Thing In World Affairs, Compared With A Median Of 74% Who Say They Have No Such Confidence

Pew Research Center survey conducted this spring in 17 advanced economies shows that negative views of him are at or near historic highs in most places. Today, a median of 22% say they have confidence in Putin to do the right thing in world affairs, compared with a median of 74% who say they have no such confidence. Singapore (55%), Greece (55%), Italy (36%) and Taiwan (34%) stand out as the only places surveyed where roughly a third or more say they have confidence in the Russian president. Confidence is lowest in Sweden (14%) and the United States (16%).

(PEW)

JUNE 14, 2021

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/06/14/few-across-17-advanced-economies-have-confidence-in-putin/

People In The Nordics Are Mostly Into City Breaks i.e. Short Holidays Spent In A City, With An Average Of 42 % People Choosing This Type Of Holiday (Ranging From 35 % Of Swedes To 46 % Of Finns)

Overall, people in the Nordics are mostly into city breaks i.e. short holidays spent in a city, with an average of 42 % people choosing this type of holiday (ranging from 35 % of Swedes to 46 % of Finns). Next up are holidays that combine relaxing and sightseeing/activity, with an average of 38 % – however, this applies to only 28 % of the Swedish population. Holidays that involve culture and history are furthermore popular across the Nordic countries (23 %).

(YouGov Denmark)
June 15, 2021

Source: https://yougov.dk/news/2021/06/15/most-popular-holiday-types-nordics/

3 In 4 Britons Believe In The Right To Seek Refuge, But 2 In 5 Want To Shut Borders Completely At This Time

A global survey by Ipsos shows almost three-quarters of Britons (73%) agree with the principle that people should be able to take refuge in other countries, including Britain, to escape from war or persecution. Only 17% of Britons disagree with this, which is lower than the average across the 28 countries (23%). However, although the proportion of people disagreeing with the right to seek refuge has remained largely the same since 2020 (15%), the proportion of Britons agreeing has decreased by 5 percentage points (78%).

(Ipsos MORI)

16 June 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/ipsos-mori/en-uk/3-4-britons-believe-right-seek-refuge-2-5-want-shut-borders-completely-time

Canadians Agree (72%) People Should Be Able To Seek Refuge From War And Persecution, But Few (10%) Like The Idea Of Letting In More Refugees Post-Pandemic

The attitudes of Canadians mirror those of the broader international community: the global average shows that 47% agree that refugees will integrate successfully into their new societies, while 44% disagree. The attitudes of Canadians fall near the centre: they are not as optimistic about refugee integration as respondents in Saudi Arabia (76%), India (68%), or Argentina (60%), but neither are they as pessimistic as residents of South Korea (29%), France (25%), or Japan (23%).

(Ipsos Canada)

22 June 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-ca/news-polls/canadians-agree-people-should-be-able-to-seek-refuge-from-war-and-persecution

Three In Five Urban Indians Would Watch More Of Women’s Sport If It Was More Accessible On TV YouGov

Globally, a third of people (33%) say they would watch more women’s sport if it was more accessible on TV.  Agreement with this statement is the highest in India, followed by Mexico and UAE. The most popular reason people give around the world for not following women’s sports is the lack of media coverage (40%). Other supply-side factors acting as barriers to engagement include lack of knowledge about women’s teams or athletes (35%), lack of marketing (30%) and limited accessibility of women’s sport on TV (27%). The speed, quality and physicality of women’s sport is much less likely to be a reason for not engaging. 

(YouGov India)
June 24, 2021

Source: https://in.yougov.com/en-hi/news/2021/06/24/three-five-urban-indians-would-watch-more-womens-s/

In Five Of Seven MENA States At Least 40 Percent Have A Favorable View Of France Overall

In 2020, he personally interceded to try to find a solution to the crisis in Lebanon and has worked to deepen engagement with other countries in the region.  Nevertheless, his personal engagement appears to have yielded limited results. Although views of France are moderately positive across the countries surveyed in Arab Barometer’s sixth wave – in five of seven at least 40 percent have a favorable view of France overall – views of Macron himself lag significantly. In no country surveyed do 40 percent of citizens have a positive view of his policies.

(Arabbarometer)

June 24, 2021

Source: https://www.arabbarometer.org/2021/06/mena-pulse-on-france-macron/

In 17 Countries Only 8% Of Respondents (Gamers And Non-Gamers) Would Describe Video Games As Inclusive

A global study conducted in 17 countries shows that only 8% of respondents (gamers and non-gamers) would describe video games as “inclusive”. We observe that  the French (22%) and the Danes (14%)  are the most likely to share this opinion. At the same time, nearly half (49%) of global consumers rate video games as fun - a figure that is on the rise by men (53%). While 35% find video games to be relaxing , 40% think they are addictive (43% of women vs. 37% of men).

(YouGov France)

June 24, 2021

Source: https://fr.yougov.com/news/2021/06/24/comment-les-jeux-video-sont-ils-percus-en-2021/

In Many Markets Such As Spain, Mexico And China, The Ratio Of People Who Prefer Hybrids To Electrics Is Around 2:1

Hong Kong is the only market where electric cars come close to matching hybrids in terms of overall preference: three in ten (30%) say they would opt for an electric car, all things being equal, while nearly a third (32%) say they would go for a hybrid. In many markets such as Spain (51% vs. 20%), Mexico (50% vs. 27%) and China (45% vs. 19%), the ratio of people who prefer hybrids to electrics is around 2:1.

(YouGov UK)

June 24, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/transport/articles-reports/2021/06/24/all-costs-being-equal-consumers-still-prefer-hybri

Global Country Average Of 74% Say There Is At Least A Fair Amount Of Tension Between Rich And Poor

The poll, which was conducted online between 23 December 2020 and 8 January 2021, shows people in South Africa (58%), India (57%) and the US (57%) are most likely to feel that their country is divided by “culture wars”, with a significant gap in opinion between them and people in Brazil (47%), who are next most likely to think their nation is divided in this way.  Those in Germany (19%), Russia (18%) and Japan (9%) are least likely to feel divided. In most countries, relatively few actively disagree with the statement (Global Country Average of 14%).

(YouGov Egypt)

25 June 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-eg/culture-war-around-the-world

 

 

ASIA

695-696-43-01/Poll

 Among White-Collar Employees, The Remote Working Practice, Which Was 13% Before The Epidemic, Has Now Reached 59% In Turkey

The Biggest Change During the Pandemic Period: The Increase in the Transition to «Remote Working» Application

According to the data we gathered from white-collar employees, the remote working practice, which was 13% before the epidemic, has now reached 59%. In multinational companies or operating in different fields, we see that remote working has increased from 21% to 94%.

slide3Remote Working Caused Companies to Make Decisions on Many Issues

Decisions were made on which teams would come to the office, which teams would work remotely, applications for those with chronic diseases, performance system adaptations, working hours and how internal communication activities would be carried out.

slide4New Work System Practices Are Clear For Management Staff But Not For White Collar Employees 

Management staff in companies mostly discussed and made decisions on issues related to «working hours and forms»; however, awareness of these issues is low among white-collar employees.

slide5Here in the Future It will be Necessary to Manage the Density Created by Technology in White Collar Employees

Two out of every three white-collar workers “have to go about their job on weekends and evenings”, “feel that their private life is being taken over by technology” and “have to spend less time with their family”.

slide6

Physical environments will be preferred to provide team spirit and socialize

White-collar employees welcome socialization activities that can be done in the physical environment, such as "planning department communication dinners every quarter, participating in in-company trainings as a team, and getting teams together outdoors at least once a year".

slide7

Here's Iraq in the Future

Here, basic problems such as “work mechanisation” and “no sense of belonging” are feared in the future. Although different solutions are discussed, there is no established practice. Therefore, the most fundamental problem that awaits companies in the future will be to develop and sustain practices for the sense of belonging.
slide8

Ece Ertürk, Country Leader of Ipsos UU & Public Affairs, commented on the subject: 

The effects of the pandemic on business life as well as its effects on our social life continue to change and transform according to new developments and expectations. As of the pandemic, one of the biggest changes we have seen in business life has been the transition to remote working with a rate of 59% . This was followed by hybrid study models with a rate of 49% . With the effect of these changes, working hours and styles , performance management and productivity were the two topics that the management staff talked and discussed the most. 
As of June, the thoughts that the difficult days are behind in the society and a more optimistic mood are on the rise, which of the changes in business life will remain in our lives after the pandemic and how the future will be shaped. We see that the rate of remote work, which was 13% before the pandemic, will continue at the level of 27% after the pandemic. Similarly, hybrid working applications seem to continue to be permanent in business life. In short, it seems that business life will continue outside the office after the pandemic. 

It is obvious that clarifying the decisions and practices that are relatively clear for the management staff in this period and minimizing uncertainties for the employees will have a positive impact on the employee satisfaction and belonging issues that have been damaged in the pandemic and are being tried to be redefined. In this world, where the mechanized business cycle, decreasing corporate unity & socialization during the pandemic period have reduced the commitment of employees to their companies, companies and managers should not allow what is out of sight to remain out of heart . 

(Ipsos Turkey)

21 June 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/tr-tr/pandemi-uzaktan-calisma-uygulamasina-gecisi-artirdi

695-696-43-02/Poll

16% Pakistanis Claim To Have Bought Something Online During The Past 6 Months

https://i0.wp.com/gallup.com.pk/wp/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/23-June-Daily-Poll-2.jpg?fit=880%2C880&ssl=1

According to a survey conducted by Gallup & Gilani Pakistan, 16% Pakistanis claimed to have shopped online during the past 6 months.  

A nationally representative sample of adult men and women from across the four provinces was asked the following question, “Have you done any online shopping during the past six months i.e. did you buy any thing/product online?” In response to this question, 16% said ‘Yes’, 82% said ‘No’ while 2% did not know/did not respond.  

(Gallup Pakistan)

June 23, 2021

Source: https://gallup.com.pk/post/31906

 

AFRICA

695-696-43-03/Poll

88 Percent Of Nigerians Believe That Child Labor Is Prevalent In Nigeria While 12 Percent Mentioned That It Is Not Prevalent

https://noi-polls.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/child-labour-23-2021-1.png

June 12th every year is a day set aside by the United Nations and International Labour Organisation as the Child Labour Day which is a day set aside to identify with children who are caught in the web of the excruciating ventures of all forms of child labour around the globe. The day also seek to showcase the progress made so far in the fight against the menace of child labour and buttress the need to bring it to a grinding halt. It is an opportunity to call on all stakeholders on the fight against child labour to intensify effort towards eradicating the menace that has robbed a lot of children of a glorious and productive future. Additionally, the Child Labour Day seek to encourage actions towards achieving the SDG 8.7 of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals.[1] The SDG 8.7 states thus “take immediate and effective measures to eradicate forced labour, end modern slavery and human trafficking and secure the prohibition and elimination of the worst forms of child labour, including recruitment and use of child soldiers, and by 2025 end child labour in all its forms”[2].

To commemorate the Child Labour Day, NOIPolls conducted a survey to gauge the opinion of Nigerians on child labour and the result revealed that 88 percent of Nigerians believe that child labour is prevalent in Nigeria while 12 percent mentioned that it is not prevalent. This further corroborates the findings of the International Labour Organisation (ILO) which states that there are 152 million children in the whole world engaged in child labour while there are 15 million children undergoing different forms of child labour in Nigeria which is the highest in West Africa[3].

The poll results which further revealed that 85 percent of respondents stated that they see children engaged in child labour within the North-East, South-East and South-South all tied at 92 percent, having the highest proportion of respondents who stated that they see children engaged in child labour in their locality. The Child Rights Act which was passed into law in 2003 stated that a child is one who is below the age of eighteen years, and it provides that the interest of such shall be paramount in all consideration. It is disappointing to note that eighteen years after incorporating the Child Rights Act, millions of children have continued to be involved in child labour in the country. This can be buttressed with findings from the poll which revealed that children are often seen engaged in different forms of labour which include; Street hawking (55 percent), Domestic work (14 percent), Street begging (9 percent) and Construction site (7 percent).

More findings revealed that poverty (55 percent) is the main cause of child labour in Nigeria. This is followed by bad economy and Parental neglect (12 percent each), to supplement for the family income (6 percent), unemployment (5 percent), population increase and illiteracy (4 percent) amongst others.

Subsequently, respondents were asked what should be done to end child labour in the country and the poll result revealed that 26 percent of the respondents are of the opinion that creating jobs is the solution to the problem of child labour. Other recommendations include; encourage free education (23 percent), improve economy (18 percent), poverty alleviation (15 percent) and child welfare (8 percent) amongst other solutions proffered. Lastly, 70 percent of the respondent disclosed that the incidence of child labour in the country has increase when compared to the pre COVID-19 era. These are some of the key findings from the child labour survey conducted in the week of 24th May 2021.

Survey Findings

The first question sought to know how prevalent the issue of child labour is in the country and the survey revealed that 88 percent of respondents stated that child labour is prevalent in Nigeria, while 12 percent stated that child labour is not prevalent in the country. Analysis across geo-political zones shows that the South-South region (94 percent) has the highest proportion of respondents who stated that child labour is prevalent, and this is followed by respondents form the North-Central (90 percent). With regards to age category, those aged 36-60 (90 percent) have the highest proportion of respondents who stated that child labour is prevalent in Nigeria.

https://noi-polls.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/c1-1024x415.png

Trend analysis shows a 10 percent drop from 2013 to 2019 and 4 percent increase from 2019 to 2021 in terms of prevalence of child labour in Nigeria.

https://noi-polls.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/c2-1024x659.png

Respondents were asked if they see children in their locality engaged in child labour and the result revealed that 85 percent of the respondents acknowledged that they see children engaged in child labour in their locality with the North-East, South-East and South-South all having 92 percent of respondents who mentioned this. Also, those aged 18-35 (88 percent) have the highest proportion of respondents who stated that they see child children engaged in child labour.

https://noi-polls.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/c3-1024x356.png

Trend analysis shows a 5-point increase in the incidence of child labour from 2019 to 2021 of the respondents who stated that they see children engaged in child labour in the country.

https://noi-polls.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/c4-1024x499.png

Respondents who stated that they see children engaged in child labour in their locality were asked the types of labour they see children engaged in and the poll result revealed that street hawking (55 percent) have the highest proportion of respondents who stated that they see children participating in child labour with the South-East (69 percent) having the highest proportion of respondents and then followed by South-South and South-west all tied at 68 percent. Others include domestic work (14 percent), street begging (9 percent), construction site (7 percent), scavenging (6 percent) and farming (6 percent) amongst others.

https://noi-polls.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/c5-1024x549.png

Trend analysis shows that street hawking increased by 2 percent from 2013 to 2016 and had an 11 percent increase in 2019 though decrease by 3 percent in 2021.

https://noi-polls.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/c6-1024x732.png

The poll findings also revealed that 55 percent of respondents stated that poverty is the cause of child labour while 12 percent ascribed it to bad economy. Others include parental neglect (12 percent), to supplement family income (6 percent), unemployment (5 percent), population increase and illiteracy (4 percent) amongst others.

https://noi-polls.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/c7-1024x717.png

Trend analysis show that poverty as a reason for child labour experienced a 24-point decrease from 2013 to 2016 and then 10-points increase from 2016 to 2019 and then 3-point increase from 2019 to 2021.

https://noi-polls.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/c8-1024x593.png

Furthermore, respondents were asked if they have family members below age 18 who engage in labour/work and the poll revealed that 35 percent disclosed that they have family members who engage in farming, 29 percent mention family business, 22 percent stated auto mechanic, 18 percent mention street hawking, 16 percent said domestic help and 10 percent mentioned bus conductor amongst other activities.

https://noi-polls.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/c9-1024x535.png

Respondents were asked about the solution to child labour and the poll result revealed that 26 percent of the respondents stated that more jobs should be created while 23 percent stated that free education should be encouraged. Others include improve economy (18 percent), poverty alleviation (15 percent), child welfare (8 percent), awareness on effect of child labour (7 percent) amongst others.

https://noi-polls.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/c10-1024x644.png

Trend analysis reveals a 1 percent decrease in job creation when current result is compared the result obtained in 2021.

https://noi-polls.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/c11-1-1024x489.png

With regards to reporting incidence of child labour, the poll revealed that majority of the respondents (78 percent) claimed that they do not know where to report incidence of child labour in Nigeria. However, 22 percent disclosed that they are aware of reporting channels with the North-East (30 percent) having the highest proportion of respondents in this category.

https://noi-polls.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/c12-1-1024x358.png

Respondents were asked to compare child labour incidence before COVID-19 era and now and findings revealed that 70 percent of respondents stated that it has increased when compared to pre COVID-19 era. On the other hand, 15 percent stated that it has remained the same while another 15 percent stated that it has decreased. Analysis across geo-political zones shows that North-Central region (80 percent) have the highest proportion of respondents who stated that child labour has increased compared to pre COVID-19 era and this is followed by South-South (78 percent).

https://noi-polls.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/c13-1024x394.png

Conclusion

In conclusion, it is disheartening to note that there is still prevalence of child labour in the country as indicated by 88 percent of respondents in the survey. This is calling on all stakeholders to expedite action in the elimination of child labour in the country so that the children involved can be accorded at least basic education to lead productive lives thereby making the society a better place for all. According to 55 percent of the respondents, the survey also revealed that the activity most children engage in is street hawking. Others include domestic work (14 percent), street-begging (9 percent), construction site (7 percent) amongst others, these are ventures that expose children to all forms of child labour and dangers that could threaten their lives and hence should be discouraged by all and sundry. The implementation of the child right act will go a long way in curbing this act of child labour, but unfortunately it has not been implemented by the various states concerned, therefore exacerbating the incidences of child labour.  

The survey also revealed the causes of child labour which include poverty (55 percent), bad economy and parental neglect (12 percent), to supplement family income (6 percent) among other causes. Nigerians proffered solution to the menace of child labour which include creating jobs (26 percent), encourage free education (23 percent), improve economy (18 percent) and poverty alleviation (15 percent) among other solutions. This is calling on all to implement the recommendation proffered by Nigerians which will ultimately eradicate the child labour conundrum and ultimately make our society a better place for our children who are the fulcrum and the necessary ingredient for a better society.

(NOI Polls)

June 16, 2021

Source: https://noi-polls.com/child-labour-poll-poverty-bad-economy-and-parental-neglect-blamed-for-the-incidence-of-child-labour-in-nigeria/

 

695-696-43-04/Poll

3 In Ten (27%) Adult South Africans And Four In Ten (37%) Young People In The Country Are Looking For Work; Youth Day 2021

Figures from Statistics South Africa confirmed that the Youth unemployment rate in South Africa increased to 63.3% in the first quarter of 2021 from 63.2% in the fourth quarter of 2020.

In the midst of the Covid-19 pandemic, Ipsos undertook a project called Mzansi Roars, that focused on the lives and livelihoods of South Africans, their incomes and spending patterns, what they eat and what they value, nutrition and health, their satisfaction with life, the financial situation of households, traditions and culture, their life-worlds, dreams and aspirations. For Youth Day 2021 we will take a look at how some of these aspects, probed in the Mzansi Roars project, continue to influence the lives of young people.

Unemployment, variable earnings and very little money to go around

By no means do we want to underplay the dire need for job creation in our country, as roughly 3 in ten (27%) adult South Africans and four in ten (37%) young people in the country are looking for work. The frightening high figure of youth unemployment needs some unpacking.

A large proportion of young South Africans are studying to improve their chances of finding a job in the future, as is evident from the 89% of 15-17 year olds, and 37% of 18-24 year olds who are students. However, entrepreneurial spirit is alive and well among the young people of South Africa, with a smaller number of youths creating a source of income for themselves.

Young South Africans are studying to improve their chances of finding a job in the future however entrepreneurial spirit is alive

The contributions made to the income of the younger age groups by means of Government Grants should not be underestimated, with more than a third (35%) of 15-17 year olds receiving a Government Grant. This support does get progressively less with age, with 29% of 18-24 year olds and 27% of 25-34 year olds receiving Government Grants.

The receipt of a regular income from a Government Grant does however not guarantee a steady income. It is remarkable that 44% of adult South Africans indicated that the amount of money they receive on a monthly basis (from all sources) keeps on changing.

This is an even bigger issue for younger people, that complicates their planning for expenses and making accurate budgeting near impossible.

adult South Africans indicated that the amount of money they receive on a monthly basis from all sources keeps on changing

With almost six in ten (59%) 15-17 year olds and almost half (48%) of 18-24 year olds saying that they “never” have any money left at the end of a month after personal and household expenses are paid, it is another sign that numerous and varied demands are made on their monthly income.

In these circumstances where every rand is turned over quite a few times before spending, it should not be surprising that South Africans of all ages do not have money set aside for emergencies. From the figure below it is clear that younger adults are definitely less prepared for unforeseen situations than older people – although a dearth of planning and provision for emergencies seem to be quite common.

younger adults are definitely less prepared for unforeseen situations than older people although a dearth of planning and provision for emergencies

Are young people more deprived?

A good question is whether this might be an indication that younger adults are more deprived than older South Africans. A variety of circumstances can be investigated to prove or disprove this notion. Access to clean water is regarded as a basic human right: Is it more difficult or laborious for younger people to access water than for older people?

 

Although these figures are probably saying a great deal more about the inefficiency and lack of delivery of basic services from local governments in all areas of the country, it is clear that a smaller proportion of young people than older people have access to running water inside their houses – and thus they have to make more of an effort to access clean water for daily use. This undoubtedly has an influence on the time available for other activities, like work and studying.

The entrepreneurial spirit, living standards and hope for the future

In an international Global Advisor study published by Ipsos in early 2021, it was found that South Africans are some of the most entrepreneurial in the world1.

Focusing specifically on young people, more than a third aged 34 and below agrees that “One needs to have your own business in order to have a secure lifestyle2” , showing that entrepreneurial spirit in the country is alive and well – and possibly fueled by a lack of other opportunities.

 

Although moderate proportions of young people agree that their standard of living is better now in relation to what it was 5 years ago, they are definitely more confident that their circumstances will improve in the future.

standard of living is better now in relation to what it was 5 years ago they are more confident that their circumstances will improve in future

Politics are not high on the agenda3

However, this hope for the future is not related to the political circumstances in the country. In fact, young people (like older people) are rather unsure and apprehensive about the direction in which the country is moving:

young people like older people are rather unsure and apprehensive about the direction in which the country is moving

In addition, young people are not really interested in politics and elections4, and about a third do not want to vote in the upcoming Local Government Elections, and the same proportions do not feel attached to any current political party in the country. This is about the same proportion as older people in the country who feel this way.

These opinions might be closely related to the low levels of trust in politicians and political parties expressed by young people (with the possible exception of the president). These figures really bring the realisation home that political parties have their work cut out before the Local Government Elections in October 2021, to convince young people to go to the polls and participate in elections that can influence their living conditions and local circumstances for the next five years.

(Ipsos South Africa)

16 June 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-za/youth-day-2021-some-desperation-and-despondency-big-dreams

 

695-696-43-05/Poll

Awareness Levels Of The New RTR Guidelines Amongst Consumers Is Quite Low 17% In South Africa

A new online study by Ipsos, conducted among car owners between 6 April to 10 May 2021, shows that respondents who are aware of the new RTR Guidelines, share a positive outlook on the implementation of these guidelines. This feeling was shared by respondents who were not aware of the RTR Guidelines, but were informed during the interviewing process.

Competition Commission

The Competition Commission has put out the final set of guidelines for “Right to Repair” that has the potential to completely shake up the automotive industry in terms of warranties and maintenance plans – coming into effect on the 1st of July 2021.

This ruling enables motorists to choose independent service centres, without their dealership warranties being affected. Not only will consumers be able to maintain a vehicle at independent service centres without voiding their warranties, the way new vehicles are quoted on and sold for will also change. Dealerships will be required to split out the Warranty and Maintenance plan costs on the quote, thereby giving the customer the option to include or exclude these, as part of their vehicle purchase.

This is a win for consumers, but it will completely change the way the automotive industry operates and will elevate the competitive landscape across the industry, more so in the small to medium business sector.

The nuts and bolts of the project

The study used a multi-modal approach, making use of qualitative and quantitative methodologies to gain a deep understanding of consumers’ sentiments and the potential behaviour changes due to RTR. Through the research, Ipsos was able to uncover the following behaviours and consumer viewpoints on RTR:

  • Consumers’ current awareness levels of RTR;
  • Emotional impact on consumers due to RTR;
  • Advantages of RTR for consumers and the industry;
  • Drawbacks of RTR for consumers and the industry;
  • Consumer concerns of how RTR will affect them and what they expect from the industry;
  • Consumers’ understanding of what service plans, maintenance plans and warranties cover;
  • How and where consumers will service vehicles and the deciding factors for choosing between an independent service provider (ISP) or franchised dealer in future;
  • Reasons consumers will stay with the franchised dealer and reasons they will switch to an ISP;
  • What will motivate consumers to switch between ISP’s and Franchised dealers;
  • Consumers’ view of “Genuine” parts vs Generic parts;
  • How RTR impacts consumers’ purchasing decisions and how they will behave in terms of purchasing Service plans, Maintenance plans and Warranties (including extended warranties) in future.

Current low awareness

The current awareness levels of the new RTR guidelines amongst consumers are low - with only 17% of respondents saying they have heard of it and have a good grasp or thorough knowledge of what the new guidelines entail.

The current awareness levels of the new RTR guidelines amongst consumers are low

Positive reaction from consumers at first glance

The emotional impact was viewed in an extremely positive light amongst respondents after they were made aware of the RTR guidelines.

There exists a genuine level of discomfort from respondents that their warranties will be voided, should they choose to service or repair their vehicles at any place other than the franchised dealer. However, with the RTR guidelines, it is easing some of the discomfort they are experiencing and providing them with peace of mind. The sentiment from respondents was that the RTR guidelines will make them feel more empowered and in control of their finances.

Despite the RTR guidelines, respondents indicated that they are still not comfortable with how disputes between Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM’s) and Independent Service Providers (ISP’s) will affect them. 70% of respondents indicated that, due to this fact they still believe there is a high potential risk of their warranties being voided.

Despite the RTR guidelines respondents indicated that they are still not comfortable with how disputes between OEM and ISP will affect them

Effect on Franchised Dealerships

The perception is that consumers and the ISP’s have more to gain through the RTR guidelines, with the OEM’s having much more to lose.

The main advantages for consumers relate to “freedom of choice” when choosing which warranty and/or maintenance plan to purchase. This allows them to “shop around” and decide on where to service or repair their vehicles. Further to this, 50% of consumers feel that RTR will financially benefit them.

Taking a closer look at the advantages for the Industry, respondents stated that these guidelines will create some healthy competition in the market and empower smaller businesses to grow, leading to job creation.

consumers relate to freedom of choice when choosing which warranty and or maintenance plan to purchase

With consumers’ lack of knowledge and understanding of the guidelines as it stands now, only 33% indicated that they would continue servicing their vehicles at a franchised dealer, but that they are eagerly waiting to have the freedom of choice to choose where to send their vehicle, and possibly reaping the financial benefits.

With consumers lack of knowledge and understanding of guidelines as it stands now indicated that they would continue servicing vehicles at dealership

(Ipsos South Africa)

17 June 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-za/right-repair-consumer-sentiment-and-potential-behavioural-changes

 

695-696-43-06/Poll

More Than Half 63% Of The Owners Of Small, Medium And Micro Enterprises (SMME’s) Saying They Experienced Great Uncertainty Regarding The Sustainability Of Their Businesses

In October 2020, Ipsos shared insights into the SMME sector and how these businesses were impacted because of the Covid-19 pandemic, with more than half of the owners of Small, Medium and Micro Enterprises (SMME’s) saying they experienced great uncertainty regarding the sustainability of their businesses. We continue the story by unpacking what advice and support the SMME business owners state they need to recover in these pressing times.

A quick recap on the business impact:

The impact of the pandemic and subsequent lockdown on business performance have been significant, with 63% of SMME’s stating that they are performing “Not Well” or “Not Very Well” after lockdown, while larger enterprises are seemingly more resilient, with a third (35%) stating that they are still performing “Well” or “Very Well” after lockdown.

The impact of the pandemic and subsequent lockdown on business performance have been significant, with 63% of SMME’s stating that they are performing Not Well or Not Very Well after lockdown

More than half (54%) of business owners used their personal savings to keep their businesses running and 36% had to revise their company spending to reduce expenses. Staff and suppliers were also impacted, and about a quarter (26%) of businesses had to let staff go, stating that they could not pay their suppliers or accounts.

Nevertheless, South African business owners stayed true to their entrepreneurial spirit, adapting to survive by implementing key changes within their business model.

What behaviour changes do business owners say they will continue with?

We asked business owners what the main lessons were that they learnt during the pandemic and that they will continue to do in the future, with the top 5 mentioned lessons being:

We asked business owners what the main lessons were that they learnt during the pandemic and that they will continue to do in the future, with the top 5 mentioned lessons being

Taking a closer look at the marketing changes that these business owners had to implement, we see that the SMME sector still heavily relies on Word of Mouth as their main marketing source, however a prominent shift towards digital marketing can be seen.

This shift leans towards channels such as their own websites (+12%) and other digital advertising channels such us social media and Google Adverts (+8%). The largest decline of marketing material used have been in the use of business cards, down by 11%.

This shift leans towards channels such as their own websites and other digital advertising channels such us social media and Google Adverts

What advice and support do SMME Business Owners need

With various external forces playing a role in the impact on their businesses such as customers spending less (55%) and price increases from suppliers (44%), the majority are still looking to financial institutions for advice, with the top advisory need raised by business owners being advice / support on how to increase their cashflow (56%), followed by payment of UIF (24%) and a fifth requesting advice on how to growth their businesses.

However, advice / support on increasing cashflow and growing businesses are broad topics that can include many different elements, the top needs (10%+) provide more direction in terms of which topics need more support and include topics such as Tax Assistance (17%), Marketing and sales support and information (17%) and linking business to bigger business (16%).

With varying levels of digital marketing experience and limited marketing budgets, it is no surprise that marketing advice and support was called out as one of the top 10 advisory requirements from SMME business owners.

With varying levels of digital marketing experience and limited marketing budgets, it is no surprise that marketing advice and support was called out as one of the top 10 advisory requirements from SMME business owners

Looking at how they prefer to receive advice, it is interesting to see that 56% of business owners still prefer email as the main communication method, followed closely by webinars (30%), personal consultations (30%) and online platforms (29%).

Looking at how they prefer to receive advice, it is interesting to see that 56% of business owners still prefer email as the main communication method, followed closely by webinars, personal consultations and online platforms

(Ipsos South Africa)

27 June 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-za/smmes-what-business-owners-say-they-need-recover-impact-covid-19

695-696-43-07/Poll

81% Zimbabweans Strongly Agree With The Fact That Even If The Lockdown Had Negative Impacts But It Was Necessary

https://afrobarometer.org/sites/default/files/zim-r8-covid-pr.png

A new Afrobarometer survey shows that even though almost half of Zimbabwean households lost a primary source of income during the COVID-19 pandemic, most citizens approve of the government’s overall management of the pandemic. Most Zimbabweans endorse lockdowns and school closures as painful but necessary.

But very few report receiving pandemic-related assistance from the government, and a majority believe that COVID-19 resources were lost to government corruption.

A majority doubt the government’s ability to ensure that COVID-19 vaccines are safe, and fewer than half say they are likely to try to get vaccinated.

(Afrobarometer)

17 Jun 2021

Source: https://afrobarometer.org/press/zimbabweans-endorse-governments-covid-19-response-voice-concerns-about-corruption-and-lack

 

WEST EUROPE

695-696-43-08/Poll

Only 6% Of Brits Think Increasing House Prices Would Be Beneficial For The Country, But One-Fifth (20%) Say It Would Be Advantageous For Their Personal Finances 

Most recent figures show that the housing market is growing at its fastest rate in seven years – a jump of 9.5% in the year to May. Experts suggest that ‘market activity continues to be boosted by the government’s stamp duty holiday’ and that this boom period may continue as the ‘unexpected savers’ of the pandemic look to invest their extra money.

Now, new YouGov tracking data shows that 58% of Brits expect prices of homes to go up in the year ahead while 21% expect them to stay about the same, and only 6% anticipate a dip.

When asked in February last year, prior to the beginning of the pandemic, 43% expected house prices to go up, compared to only 8% who thought they would drop. Fast-forward to April 2020 - just after the UK entered its first lockdown – and the number of those that thought house prices would increase tumbled to just 19%, while those who anticipated a fall, increased to 41%.

Opinion remained static for a couple of months, before beginning to rise from June to August, at which point it levelled off once again at around 35%. The success of the vaccination programme caused confidence to rebound, with the number expecting house prices to go up shooting up from 35% in mid-January 2021 to 50% in mid-March. Expectations that house prices will rise have grown further since that point, reaching 58% in early June.

Half of Brits think it would be better for the country if house prices dropped

In general, 48% of the public say it would be better for Britain if house prices went down, while a much smaller proportion (6%) think it would be better if prices increased. Around a quarter (27%) believe it would be best if it remained at the current level.

When asked the same question, but this time thinking about personal finances, One-fifth of Brits (20%) say they would be better off if prices rose. A similar proportion (22%) say it would be beneficial if prices fell.


Generational differences also become apparent when considering property and personal finance. Unsurprisingly, those saying it would be beneficial if prices dropped is particularly high among those most likely to be looking to get on to the property ladder.

Over half (56%) of those aged 18 to 24 claim a price drop would be beneficial and 29% of 25 to 49’s agree. However, only 11% of 50-64’s and 3% of those aged over 65 say they would be better off if house prices rose.

Half (48%) of Brits say it will make little difference to them personally if house prices rise or fall. This is most apparent among those aged 65+ (72%) compared to only 20% of those aged 18 to 24

(YouGov UK)

June 14, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/economy/articles-reports/2021/06/14/majority-brits-expect-house-prices-increase-year-a\

 

695-696-43-09/Poll

Three In Ten (31% Of 18-34’s) Football Fans Say Live TV Is A Thing Of The Past (Compared To 20% Of Over 35s)

In April, as he offered a defence of the European Super League, Real Madrid President Florentino Pérez declared that “young people are no longer interested in football”. Yet those arguments haven’t seemed to worry UK broadcasters, who this month signed up to roll-over their existing contracts with the Premier League in a £4.7bn deal.  

So what does YouGov’s data tell us about young people and the beautiful game – and how can marketers and advertisers more effectively reach them? 

How they watch football 

Comparing football fans aged 18-34 and over-35s reveals key differences in viewing preferences. While TV is still the most popular way to watch the game, older fans are more likely to turn on the telly to watch live football (87% vs. 82% of 18-34s) and highlights (67% vs. 61% of 18-34s). 

Younger fans are more sceptical of the box. While four in five watch sport on live TV (82%), some may be doing so reluctantly. Three in ten (31%) say live TV is a thing of the past (compared to 20% of over 35s), and nearly as many say streaming is better than live TV (28%) compared to one in seven (14%) older football fans.  

Where they watch football 

Looking at the four major broadcasters involved in the renewed football rights deal shows that older fans are more likely to have recently watched Sky Sports (39% vs. 30% of 18-34s), BBC Sport (24% vs. 17%), and BT Sport (24% vs. 21%). There’s more parity when it comes to Amazon Prime Video (30% vs. 31% of 18-34s) but we shouldn’t assume too much from this, given that the service comes free with the overall Amazon Prime package.  

The gap can be partially explained through simple household economics. Two in five (39%) of the younger demographic live with their parents and therefore may not have control over their household TV situation – including which channels their household subscribes to. 

But it’s likely no accident that Now TV, which doesn’t tie viewers to a longer-term contract, is more popular among 18-34s than over-35s (11% vs. 8%). Four in five younger football fans say streaming services have “changed TV watching” for them (82% vs. 53% of over-35s), and the more long-term contracts offered by more traditional broadcasters could be putting them off. Offering more short-term viewing options to younger fans may help broadcasters reap greater commercial rewards among this group. 

Younger fans notice marketing but expect more from it 

Our data suggests that younger football fans are more attentive to marketing – but also expect more from it.  

For instance, fans aged 18-34 are more likely to say they notice the brands that sponsor events (52% vs. 29% of over 35s). They’re also more likely to think sponsorship can help companies stay socially relevant (66% vs. 48% of over-35s), and nearly three in five agree that they love seeing that their favourite team has cool sponsors (57% vs 32% of over 35s).  

How and where to advertise to younger fans 

However, with attention comes scrutiny. Fans aged 18-34 are more likely to say that the brands that sponsor sports don’t make sense (71% vs. 63% of over-35s), and that they deserve special discounts from those brands (44% vs. 34%).They may also have a poorer attention span: 18-34s are much more likely to say they’re bored all the time (40% vs. 25%).  

So clubs, broadcasters, and marketers should take care when addressing this audience: they watch the game differently, and they respond to promotions and communications differently too. 

For example, while they’re less likely to say that TV ads have the biggest chance of getting their attention (20% vs. 34% of over-35s), online ads are more likely to catch their eye (31% vs. 19%). A quarter are also on TikTok (23%), so a short-form social strategy could also pay off. But content is key.  

Younger fans want different messages and messengers 

A big, bold message may be risky with over-35s (65% of them vs. 43% of 18-34s think brands shouldn’t express views on political or social issues), but most 18-34s think brands should be free to speak out when they feel strongly about an issue (64% of 18-34s vs. 40% of over-35s).  

Marketers may also wish to consider how they select brand ambassadors aimed at younger fans. Fans aged 18-34 are more likely to cite wonderkids in continental leagues like Kylian Mbappe (16% vs. 9% of over-35s) and Erling Haaland (15% vs. 6% of over-35s) as favourites, while over-35s prefer Premier League stalwarts like Harry Kane (23% vs. 18% of 18-34s) and Mo Salah (20% vs. 16%).  

While a campaign that appeals to naked self-interest – i.e. a shirt sponsor promising exclusive discounts to fans of a particular team – may pay off, an ad fronted by Jadon Sancho that sensitively tackles themes of social responsibility could be just as effective.  

2021 is half over, and the Premier League has already seen off the threat of a breakaway competition and the prospect of an open-market auction over broadcast rights. But while the current TV deals are preserved in amber until 2025, there’s evidence that fans may be changing. Will clubs, marketers, and broadcasters change with them?  

(YouGov UK)

June 17, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/sport/articles-reports/2021/06/17/has-football-really-lost-its-way-younger-fans

 

695-696-43-10/Poll

Britons Will Miss Practicing Better Hygiene (66%), Less Traffic On Roads At Peak Times (63%) And Quiet Shops And Supermarkets (59%)

New polling by Ipsos MORI shows that while many will be ready to see the end of lockdown, there are plenty of aspects of lockdown that will be missed. Among the things most likely to be looked back on fondly are people practising better hygiene with two-thirds saying they will miss this at least a fair amount (66%), less traffic on roads at peak times (63%) and quiet shops and supermarkets (59%). 

Over half (53%) will miss spending more time with family, while a quarter (24%) will be not be unhappy to leave it behind. However, people are more enthusiastic about seeing family in real life as opposed to video call, almost half (47% not very much/at all) will not miss speaking to family/ friends more via technology. And despite being fond of the time they’ve spent with their families, half of parents are keen to see the back of home-schooling (50%), while three in ten (28%) will miss it. 

Many will miss the calmness created by lockdown. Half (50%) say they will miss tourist attractions and public places being quiet, whilst 42% will miss quieter public transport.

Those currently employed will miss aspects of their working life during lockdown; 44% will miss being able to work more flexibly, while 40% will miss not having to commute. Almost four in ten (38%) will miss not having to dress smartly for work and around a third (36%) say they’ll miss working from home full time. 

Opinion is split when it comes to socialising again. Four in ten (39%) will miss not having to socialise with other people, while 45% will not miss this. Britons are also divided as to whether they will miss getting to know their neighbours and community better – a third (32%) say they will miss this whilst another three in ten (30%) will not. 

Two in three (67%) will not miss government briefings, whilst around one in five will (18%). Similarly, half (51%) will not miss having to pay more attention to politics and the news.  Three in five (59%) will not miss having to wear face masks, however opinion is more split concerning other measures put in place to stop the spread of COVID-19. Forty-four per cent will be pleased to see the end of not greeting people with hugs, kisses or handshakes, against another four in ten (38%) who will miss it.  

Gideon Skinner, Head of Political Research at Ipsos MORI, said:

We know that there are many things people are looking forward to when the coronavirus restrictions end, including getting proper face time with friends and family. But we’ve also seen that there will be at least some aspects of lockdown that people will miss – again partly the opportunity to spend more time with family (if not home-schooling), but also the peace and quiet, and the reassurance provided by people paying more attention to hygiene.
There are also implications for the future of work, with the opportunity to work flexibly and from home, to dress informally, and cut out the commute clearly appealing to a number of workers.
But there is very clearly one aspect of the pandemic that people won’t miss – and that is the burden of having to pay more attention to politics, the news, and keeping up-to-date with the latest on the virus.  One key aspect of getting back to normal for many Britons will simply be just not having to think about these issues as much any more.

(Ipsos MORI)

20 June 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/ipsos-mori/en-uk/what-will-britons-miss-about-lockdown-ipsos-mori

 

695-696-43-11/Poll

4 In 10 (44%) Britons Believe That There Are Still Many Important Issues To Finalise With The EU

New polling by Ipsos MORI, in partnership with UK in a Changing Europe, finds that 4 in 10 (44%) Britons believe that there are still many important issues to finalise with the EU, with Remain voters most likely to feel this way about negotiations (62%).  In contrast, 30% of leave voters say there are still many important issues to discuss.

Most people think negotiations over Britain’s future relationship with the EU will continue in the next few years - Ipsos MORI

Five years after the referendum, the majority of Britons (56%) say it hasn’t made any difference to their daily lives, however there is still a significant split between leavers and remainers.  Remainers are more likely to say it has impacted their lives negatively (51%) and only 5% of remain voters think it has made life better. Whilst only 1 in 10 leave voters say it has impacted them negatively and 7 in 10 (71%) say it hasn’t changed anything for them on a day-to-day basis.

Most think Brexit is making little difference to their daily lives - Ipsos MORI

When asked about whether they knew anyone whose job of business had been impacted by Brexit, a quarter (25%) said they did know someone, compared to 8% who said they knew someone that had been positively impacted. The majority (59%) didn’t know anyone that had been affected by Brexit.

Nearly half (47%) of people report that Brexit is working out as expected, but unsurprisingly those that voted to remain in the EU are the least positive – 48% of remainers say is working out worse, compared to 10% of leave voters.

Kelly Beaver, MD of Public Affairs, Ipsos MORI, says:

We are now five years on from Brexit and the majority of people say it has no impact on their lives to date, however nearly half of us also feel that we have many unresolved issues to negotiate with the EU.  The public remain divided on Brexit and there is potential for this to become more pronounced when the pandemic ends and the spotlight returns to the issue of Brexit. Will remainers be won over by new trade deals and greater independence?  Or will the reality of red tape on holidays and promises that may not be fulfilled leave the leave voters feeling disenchanted with Brexit?

Paula Surridge, Deputy Director at UK in a Changing Europe said:

The full implications of the decision to leave the European Union are not yet being felt widely among the British public. The wider crisis of the last 18 months - tens of thousands of deaths, an ever-growing health crisis, chaos in the school system, cancelled holidays and lockdowns – may have both masked some impacts and changed what people think is possible. But the Conservative majority is built on high expectations for positive change as a result of Brexit, and it remains to be seen, once other concerns have waned, whether the government is able to convince them that Brexit has delivered.

(Ipsos MORI)

23 June 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/ipsos-mori/en-uk/five-years-brexit-they-think-its-all-over-it-isnt

 

695-696-43-12/Poll

Around Two In Five (63%) Of The Unvaccinated Are Convinced By Arguments Which Say There Hasn’t Been Enough Time To See What The Side-Effects Of The Vaccine Might Be

Before the vaccine roll-out began late last year, the majority of Britons were convinced by the argument that there had not been enough time to see the side-effects of the vaccine – now just two in five (41%) think the same, down 20ppt.  

Just six months ago, around half thought there had not been enough time to test whether the vaccine really works – now just a third (35%) think that is a persuasive reason to not get vaccinated (down 23ppt). Similarly, only three in ten (31%) are convinced by the argument that vaccine doses will be limited, and others will need them more, 20ppt fewer than last November.

How convincing are arguments against taking the COVID-19 vaccine?This said, whilst believed by only a minority, some arguments against taking the vaccine are proving harder to dispel. Around one in five (19%) still argue that vaccines can cause autism, up from 15% since November. A similar proportion say the vaccine is too expensive (20%) despite it being free, and that previous flu vaccines they have had in the past have not worked (24%). One in four (24%) think COVID-19 is unlikely to make people seriously unwell. All these arguments are relatively unchanged compared to six months ago.

Britons yet to be vaccinated are more susceptible towards arguments against getting jabbed. Around two in five (63%) of the unvaccinated are convinced by arguments which say there hasn’t been enough time to see what the side-effects of the vaccine might be. This compares to a third of those who had at least one dose (33%). 

Similarly, around half of people unvaccinated are convinced by arguments against taking it such as there has not been enough time to test whether it works (52%), doses of the vaccine will be limited and others will need it more (50%) or they don’t trust the Government telling them to take it (49%).

Meanwhile, the majority of Britons are now convinced by all the arguments tested in favour of taking the vaccine. Among the most convincing is that a vaccine will reduce the risk of people becoming seriously ill if they do catch COVID-19 (83%), along with the belief that getting vaccinated will protect others from catching the virus (83%).

How convincing are arguments for following taking the COVID-19 vaccine?

In fact, overall, confidence in the vaccine remains high, as results from our latest KnowledgePanel survey show. However, there are concerns about its effectiveness against new variants of COVID-19; half (48%) say they are worried about this. Despite these concerns, the survey of over 8,000 adults in the UK shows that nine in ten people (91%) say it is important to get the vaccine to stop the spread of new variants.

In general, concerns about the effectiveness of the vaccine against new variants do not seem to be diminishing intentions to have it; 94% of people say they have already had the vaccine or will have it. However, worries about its effectiveness are higher amongst groups with lower existing levels of confidence in the vaccine. For example, concern is highest amongst young people aged 16-24 and people from an ethnic minority (both 60%).

Anna Quigley, Research Director at Ipsos MORI, said of the findings:

While results from both our Omnibus and UK KnowledgePanel surveys show high levels of confidence in the COVID-19 vaccine, there is still a need to engage with those that remain worried and doubtful. Some arguments against the vaccine are holding strong, while there are worries about how effective it will be against new variants, highlighting the need for more conversation in these areas.

(Ipsos MORI)

24 June 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/ipsos-mori/en-uk/arguments-against-taking-vaccine-lost-ground-many-concerned-about-ability-fight-variants

 

695-696-43-13/Poll

One In Twelve Parents Say They Regret Having Children

Online forums such as Mumsnet, Reddit and Quora are full of threads with guilt-ridden parents who desperately ask if anyone else regrets having children too.

YouGov data shows that while the vast majority of parents (83%) insist they’ve never felt this way, a small number admit to it. One in twelve parents (8%) say they regret having children, while another 6% have previously had regrets but don’t now.

While there’s no difference between mothers and fathers, younger parents aged 25 to 34 are the most likely to feel regretful, with one in five either rueing their choice (13%) or having done so (9%).

Those aged 55+, for most of whom tantrum-throwing toddlers and sleep deprivation are a fading memory, are the least woeful. Only one in ten are unhappy with their decision to have children (6%) or have questioned it in the past (4%).

Among the 8% of parents who still regret having kids, 5% say it’s to a small extent, while for 2% it’s to a moderate degree, and for 1% to a large extent.

The pattern is fairly similar among mothers and fathers who have previously been unhappy with parenthood, with 5% insisting their regrets were minor, and 1% saying they regretted it to a moderate degree.

Three in ten parents wish they’d had more children

While some 8% of parents currently feel regretful about their offspring, a separate survey shows that only half as many (4%) say they would not have had children if they could do it all again. A similar figure say they would have had fewer kids (4%). It’s much more common for people to wish they’d had more children, at 29%. The majority (54%) would have the same number if given the option again.

A third of younger parents aged 25 to 49 (32%) wish they’d had more children, while parents in the oldest age group, 65+, are the least likely to say so at 25%. The UK’s fertility rate is much lower today than in the 1960s and 70s, meaning younger Britons tend to have fewer children than their parents’ generation.

In this instance there is also a difference between the genders, with a third of mothers (32%) wishing they’d had more children, compared with one in four fathers (24%).

(YouGov UK)

June 24, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/education/articles-reports/2021/06/24/one-twelve-parents-say-they-regret-having-children

 

695-696-43-14/Poll

Despite General Hesitancy For Loosening Restrictions, 61% Of The Public Support Lifting The Limit Of 30 Attendees In Weddings

The Government recently announced that the final phase of the roadmap has been pushed back by four weeks, but they did change some of the rules around weddings for the period between 21 June and 19 July. The 30-guest limit has been lifted, but other rules around social distancing, dancing and table service remain in place. New YouGov polling finds that the British public are generally supportive of the cautious approach.

Despite general hesitancy for loosening restrictions, 61% of the public support lifting the limit of 30 attendees. Perhaps unsurprisingly, three quarters (74%) of those who are attending a wedding in the next month support the measure, compared to 60% of people who will not be affected by the rule change.

There is particularly strong support for maintaining social distancing at weddings, however, with 69% backing this rule. This is also the only measure where support is consistent regardless of whether people are set to attend a wedding soon (68% amongst people who are vs 69% amongst those who are not).

The measure with the weakest support is the ban on indoor dancefloors, although even here, 50% of Britons support the measure. Amongst people who said that they will be attending a wedding or civil ceremony or getting married themselves, support drops to 39%, with the majority (56%) opposing the ban.

Public split on whether to extend the furlough scheme

Despite the delay to the roadmap, the government has stated that the furlough scheme will be phased out from 1 July as planned. Through the pandemic, furloughed workers have had 80% of their wage paid by the government – this will now be rolled back in stages, with the government covering 70% of wages in July, 60% in August and 50% in September, before the scheme ends completely on 30 September. As it stands, the scheme has cost the government £64 billion.

When asked what should happen with the furlough scheme, the British public are divided –28% think the government should go ahead with the phasing out, while another 35% think the current scheme should be extended to 19 July. There is significantly less appetite for extending the scheme any further than this, with just 13% saying the scheme should be extended for a further three months or longer.

Continued confidence in the vaccine rollout

As part of the roadmap announcement, the government also revised its vaccination target, bringing forward its goal of giving all adults their first dose of the vaccination in line with the new 'Freedom Day'. Seven in ten Britons (71%) are confident that the government can hit this target, although there may be some concern that the largest remaining group to receive their first vaccinations – 18-24 year olds – are the least confident that this goal will be met (55%).

 

(YouGov UK)

June 24, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2021/06/24/british-public-support-cautious-approach-weddings

 

695-696-43-15/Poll

Around 13,000 People In Germany Develop Blood Cancer Every Year, For Which A Stem Cell Donation Is Often The Last Chance Of A Cure

Great potential for possible donors, especially among younger people 
In addition to the 22 percent who are already entered in a stem cell donor register or have even donated stem cells, another 40 percent of those questioned are potential donors. One in ten (10%) is already determined to register, almost one in three (30%) is “perhaps ready”. Among the 18- to 34-year-olds, one in four (25%) is already registered and, at 17 percent, a clearly above-average proportion decided to register. Another 28 percent may be willing to donate stem cells. The potential for potential donors is particularly high among younger adults. 

Fear of intervention is the biggest barrier to stem cell donation
However, three quarters (78%) of potential stem cell donors (determined / perhaps ready) still express concerns about a possible donation. This mostly concerns medical aspects: The fear of the procedure or the operation is mentioned most frequently among this group of people (30%), but the fear of pain (21%) and possible long-term effects (20%) also belong one of the greatest barriers to registration. Another 20 percent cite concerns about hospital germs and 16 percent the fear that their own immune system might not be strong enough. In addition, 14 percent do not want to add hormones to their body to stimulate stem cell production. The feeling of not being adequately informed even makes one in four (24%) potential stem cell donors hesitate. 

Stem cell donation infographic

Widespread lack of information about stem cell donation
Despite the high level of willingness to register, one in three respondents (33%) felt little or no information about the topic of stem cell donation. In contrast, there are only 24 percent who state that they are already very or very well versed in this area. More than four out of ten respondents (43%) indicate a medium level of information.  

The rumor persists that stem cells are removed from the spinal cord. Even a majority of those who say they are “at least somewhat informed” are of this opinion. Only one in three knows that there are several donation registers (35%) and two different methods (from the bloodstream / from the bone marrow) of stem cell collection (31%). 

Media The most important source of information on stem cell
donation Information on the topic of stem cell donation is currently reaching the German population primarily through traditional media such as TV, radio and newspapers - both through contributions (26%) and through advertisements placed there (22%). Conversations with friends and acquaintances are also a frequently mentioned point of contact (22%). A fifth of those surveyed (20%) have already heard a call for donations in their own community. In contrast, social media only play a subordinate role as a source of information on the topic of stem cell donation (16%). In view of the comparatively great open-mindedness of the younger age group, there is certainly still development potential in this area. 

(Ipsos Germany)

June 24, 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/de-de/studie-die-grossten-barrieren-bei-der-stammzellspende

 

695-696-43-16/Poll

Nearly Half (48%) Of People Who Regularly Shop Online Would Use “Buy Now, Pay Later” Service If It Were Available

These are applications (or electronic services that can also be used at points of sale) that allow you to divide the amount due into three or four installments to be paid in the following months, without interest - and are different from financing, as they do not require any pre-approval, and can also be used on small amounts.

Italians are receptive to this idea. In fact, nearly half (48%) of people who regularly shop online would use such a service if it were available.

However, the new services are not yet well known: at the moment in Italy there are three brands that offer this service, and knowledge of all of them is still very limited: these are Scalapay (11%), Klarna (5%) and Afterpay (3%)

In general, Italians are cautious about credit: even if one in three consider it a way of  buying things that normally could not be afforded (28%), the majority (45%) resort to personal loans and cards credit only "as a last resort" , and finds the idea of ​​debt stressful (69%).

But the functioning of fractional payment apps, different from classic retail credit, could be the key to paving the way for more flexible lending services adapted to people's daily needs.

(YouGov Italy)

June 14, 2021

Source: https://it.yougov.com/news/2021/06/14/app-di-pagamenti-rate-online-grande-potenziale-ma-/

 

695-696-43-17/Poll

Since 2018, Internet Sales Are Twice As Popular (Going From 11% To 22%) - Particularly By Women (28%) And Young People (39% Of 25-34 Year Olds)

What do the French do with the clothes they no longer wear?

Donations to associations come first (39%), followed by internet sales (22%) and donations to people around them (14%).

Since 2018, internet sales are twice as popular (going from 11% to 22%) - particularly by women (28%) and young people (39% of 25-34 year olds).

Note: 12% of respondents say they leave things they no longer carry in their closet (-4 points since 2018) and 7% throw them in the trash.

The most used sales platforms

Vinted leads the way and has gained 16 points since 2018  : among the French who say they sell their clothes online when they no longer wear them, 85% use this platform, against 69% three years earlier.

https://d25d2506sfb94s.cloudfront.net/r/66/v-etements-seco_54875366%20(1).png

Leboncoin and Facebook Marketplace maintain their positions (2 nd and 3 rd respectively ) but the use of these platforms is decreasing for this type of activity. Indeed, Leboncoin goes from 52% to 31% and Facebook Marketplace from 25% to 13%.

How often and what income?

The vast majority of French people who sell their clothes on the internet do so at least once every 6 months (82%) .

Note: 42% of respondents even say they do it at least once a month.

This activity generates less than € 100 in income for 55% of respondents, between € 100 and € 200 in income for 21% and more than € 200 for 14%.

It can be seen that the frequency of sales and the income generated remain stable compared to 2018 . This activity has therefore mainly evolved in terms of the number of people who practice it and the platforms used.

(YouGov France)

June 14, 2021

Source: https://fr.yougov.com/news/2021/06/14/la-seconde-vie-du-pret-porter/

 

695-696-43-18/Poll

1 In 5 Spaniards Will Continue To Use The Mask Despite Not Being Mandatory

Next Saturday one of the Covid-19 sanitary measures that generated the most controversy from the beginning and that, in turn, most bothered many will be modified: the mandatory use of masks outdoors . Although the specific details are not yet known, starting next Saturday, June 26, Spaniards will be able to walk through the streets, beaches and mountains without having to use a complement that was already part of everyone's routine. 

Aware of the controversy generated around the decision of the central executive, Ipsos has carried out a consultation among Spaniards through its What & Why community , in order to analyze their opinion on the change in health measures that will live from this end of week. 

Regarding the decision that masks are no longer mandatory in open spaces, 26% of those interviewed say they do not agree with this new measure . A measure that for 38% is something hasty . A percentage that also corresponds to those who think that this decision should have come once group immunity was achieved . In addition, 23% of them affirm that they still do not feel comfortable or safe not wearing a mask.

However, the percentage of citizens interviewed who do agree with the measure that will be implemented as of this Saturday is higher than those who do not. Since 72% say they are in favor of this change, although even so, 19% say that they will continue to use the mask until they achieve group immunity. 

On when to use it, 2 out of 5 declare that they will wear it depending on the influx of the space where they are and 28% say that they will always carry a mask with them in case at any time they need to use it. 

“As of Saturday we will experience a new rule change regarding the management of the pandemic, the use of the mask has deeply penetrated society, and although many want to take it off as soon as possible, many have also decided to continue using it or at least on certain occasions, even after the pandemic is over. Taking off the mask generates hope and suspicion in equal parts about the end and control of the crisis ” , says Vicente Castellanos, Director of Public Opinion and Political Studies at Ipsos in Spain. 

In this same consultation, Ipsos wanted to know the position on the possibility that those vaccinated with a complete schedule could stop using a mask in any field . Faced with this question, only 14% would agree that the vaccinated should stop using the mask both in open and closed spaces, while 25% would agree if it is only like that outside. Although 34% are inclined because the rules should be the same for everyone and that not because they have received the vaccine should they stop using the mask. And it is that, in this regard, 27% also consider that those vaccinated should also use it since there is still a probability of contagion. 

Although, for many, the change in regulations that will take place on the 26th will not mean a change in habits, the study also suggests that if once the pandemic is over they consider that the use of a mask should be mandatory when they have symptoms of flu or cold, something with which 40% of those interviewed would agree. Meanwhile, almost half of those surveyed (49%) affirm that they would agree that it should be taken, but not as a mandatory matter, but as a recommendation. For their part, 11% would not support this measure.

(Ipsos Spain)

June 22, 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/es-es/1-de-cada-5-entrevistados-continuara-usando-la-mascarilla-pesar-de-no-ser-obligatoria

NORTH AMERICA

695-696-43-19/Poll

69% Americans Are Most Likely To Indicate They Will Currently Still Wear A Mask On Airplanes Or Trains

We explored where Americans will continue to wear masks, and whether they assume that people wearing a mask have not been vaccinated. The questions about mask-wearing were only asked to Americans because a greater proportion of the American population is currently fully vaccinated. With second doses of COVID-19 vaccines being available earlier in certain provinces, we also explored Canadians’ perspectives on receiving a second dose.

This survey is conducted in collaboration with the Association for Canadian Studies (ACS) and published in the Canadian Press. This series of surveys is available on Leger’s website


THE FUTURE OF WEARING A MASK IN THE UNITED STATES

  • Americans are most likely to indicate they will currently still wear a mask on airplanes or trains (69%), at large stores (grocery, general goods, etc.) (65%) and/or in small stores (convenience stores, etc.) (62%).
  • More than three-in-ten Americans who still wear a mask on airplanes/trains, at large stores, at small stores, at sporting events or concerts, and/or at bars/restaurants think they will not stop wearing a mask at/in each of these until 2022.
  • 19% of Americans assume that if they see someone wearing a mask, that person has not been vaccinated.

https://2g2ckk18vixp3neolz4b6605-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Future-of-Wearing-Masks-in-the-United-States_EN_2021-06-15-1024x1024.jpg

RECEIVING A SECOND DOSE OF ASTRAZENECA

  • 50% of Canadians who received a first dose of AstraZeneca would prefer to get a second dose of AstraZeneca, 32% would prefer getting a second dose of another brand of vaccine, and 18% don’t know what they would prefer.

Second Dose Preferences

(Leger)        

June 15th, 2021

Source: https://leger360.com/surveys/legers-north-american-tracker-june-15-2021/

 

695-696-43-20/Poll

About One-Third (32%) Of The Posts On Conservative Facebook Pages And Roughly Half (52%) On Liberal Pages Were Neither Positive Nor Negative

A new study of posts on popular public Facebook pages about the early days of the Biden administration finds that the focus of these posts, as well as the assessments of the new president, differed widely by the ideological orientation of the pages.

Large differences in assessments of the Biden administration between liberal and conservative Facebook pages This analysis – which follows a recent Pew Research Center report examining a broader sample of 25 major news outlets on TV, radio and the web – focuses on the 1,226 posts published on 25 popular public Facebook pages focused on current affairs (based on average total monthly interactions) during a crucial week for President Joe Biden, March 8-14, in which he signed the $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief bill.1 (The Center also fielded a survey that week about Americans’ views of news about the new administration.) With about one-in-five U.S. adults (18%) saying they often get political news on social media, this latest research explores how news coverage on social media may have differed from broader coverage of the new administration.

The popular pages included all have a focus on current affairs and are a mix of political groups like Occupy Democrats or Team Trump; figures such as Barack Obama or Donald Trump Jr.; commentators like Ben Shapiro or Robert Reich; and news outlets like The Western Journal and NowThis.

Among popular Facebook pages that describe themselves as conservative (12 of the 25 pages studied), 1% of posts carried positive assessments of the Biden administration, while 67% were negative. For those pages that self-identified as liberal (11 of the 25), only 1% of the posts carried negative assessments while 47% had a positive one. About one-third (32%) of the posts on conservative Facebook pages and roughly half (52%) on liberal pages were neither positive nor negative.2

These differences in assessments follow the same pattern found in the broader news media study and are another reminder of the deeply polarized information environment in the country. (It is important to note that while the ideological groupings for the Facebook pages were based on self-descriptions, the groupings in the broader study were based on audience makeup – a metric not available for Facebook pages.)

Economy was a more common topic on liberal Facebook pages; immigration more common on conservative pages There were also clear differences by self-described ideology in the topics these pages posted about. Even with the enactment of the coronavirus relief bill, the leading topic on conservative Facebook pages during the week studied was immigration, which accounted for 32% of all posts on these pages – well ahead of the economy, at 12%. On liberal pages, however, the economy dominated, accounting for just under half of their posts (46%). In stark contrast to the conservative pages, only 2% of posts on liberal pages were about immigration. (Only two of these 25 pages did not self-identify with an ideology, and so we do not focus on their results here.)

Facebook posts covered similar topics as broader coverage but were more negative

This report also compares Facebook posts about the Biden administration with coverage in the broader mix of outlets studied in our previous report. Both samples analyzed here include only posts or stories from the week of March 8-14, 2021. The outlets studied in the previous research include 25 major news outlets on TV, radio and the web; Facebook pages of these outlets were not included in this analysis. These two samples covered the new administration using the same mix of topics but carried a more negative assessment on Facebook.

Among all Facebook posts studied, the economy was the leading subject (28% of all posts), as was the case in the study of broader coverage from TV, radio and the web, where 36% of all stories about Biden focused on that topic. The top five Biden topics were the same in both samples, although there was a slightly larger emphasis on immigration on Facebook pages (19%) than in the broader coverage (11%), and the broader coverage emphasized health care (21%) more than Facebook posts did (12%).

The two samples did differ, however, in the overall assessments they offered of the Biden administration. On popular Facebook pages, posts with negative assessments outnumbered positive ones by 36% to 21%. But in the broader coverage of Biden, it was almost an even split, with 31% of stories offering a positive assessment compared with 28% carrying a negative one. A plurality of coverage in both groups offered neither a positive nor negative assessment. One contributing factor to this difference in coverage may be the self-described ideological orientation of the 25 popular Facebook pages studied compared with the political leaning of audiences across the 25 news outlets in the broader coverage. For the 25 Facebook pages, self-identifications were almost equally divided between conservative (12) and liberal (11), while in the broader analysis, there were far more news outlets with audiences that lean to the left politically (13) than with audiences that lean to the right (6), which reflects the lower levels of trust of many major outlets among Republicans.

Higher engagement with Facebook posts that had a positive assessment of the Biden administration or mentioned Trump

Facebook posts about the Biden administration that mentioned Trump received higher engagementOne way to gauge the impact of Facebook posts is to measure their engagement through the number of interactions – the sum of reactions (including likes and other reactions), shares, and comments – that they generate. Posts with positive assessments of Biden generated an average of about 13,800 interactions per post, considerably more than the roughly 10,700 interactions for each post with a negative assessment. More generally, posts from liberal pages generated somewhat more engagement than posts from conservative pages — an average of about 12,500 interactions per post versus about 11,300 interactions, respectively.

One catalyst for engagement was the former president. Posts that mentioned Donald Trump averaged about 19,800 interactions, more than twice as much engagement as posts that did not invoke the former president (roughly 9,200).

Liberal and conservative Facebook pages offered very different views of the Biden administration

Large differences in assessments of Biden administration between liberal and conservative Facebook pages Liberal and conservative Facebook pages widely diverged from each other in how they discussed the early days of the Biden administration across a range of aspects – including assessments of the Biden administration, storylines covered, and whether the pandemic and the former president were mentioned.

Of the 25 popular current affairs-oriented public Facebook pages examined in this report, nearly all gave some indication of an ideological orientation. Pages that identified as liberal described themselves as liberal, progressive, Democratic, or opposed to conservativism or Republicans, while pages that identified as conservative described themselves as conservative, Republican, or opposed to liberalism or Democrats. Researchers used these descriptions to classify the ideology of the page as liberal, conservative, or neither.

In all, 11 of the 25 pages self-described as liberal and 12 as conservative. Just two pages did not describe themselves as favoring one side of the political spectrum; these were classified as “didn’t self-identify” and are less of a focus of this analysis.3

Economy was a more common topic among liberal Facebook pages; immigration more common on conservative pagesThe most dramatic difference between posts from the two ideologically different groups of Facebook pages is in their overall assessment of the Biden administration.4 In the self-described liberal pages, about half of the posts carried neither a positive nor negative assessment of the new administration (52%) or a positive one (47%) during the week studied (March 8-14, 2021). A mere 1% featured a negative assessment.

Among the self-described conservative pages, however, two-thirds of the posts (67%) had a negative assessment of Biden and his administration, while about another third (32%) did not have a clearly negative or positive assessment. And, in sharp contrast to the liberal Facebook pages, just 1% of posts on conservative pages offered a positive assessment of the new administration.

Popular liberal and conservative pages also focused most of their attention on different topics related to the Biden presidency. By far, the dominant topic of the posts on the liberal pages was the economy (46% of all posts on liberal pages), likely reflecting Biden’s signing of the $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief bill during the week studied. The next most common topic among liberal pages was health care, well behind at 16% of posts. No other topic was the focus of more than one-in-ten posts.

COVID-19 mentioned more frequently in posts from liberal Facebook pages In contrast, the leading topic in posts from conservative pages was immigration (32% of posts there), with interest likely fueled by the buildup of migrants at the U.S. southern border during the early days of the Biden presidency. The economy was the focus about a quarter as often (12%) as on liberal pages and was discussed at roughly the same rate as three other topics: health care (9%), political skills (9%) and the news media (8%).

There is an even starker difference between the two types of Facebook pages on one of the biggest issues of the day: the coronavirus pandemic. In addition to whether COVID-19 was the main topic of a post, researchers also analyzed whether COVID-19 was mentioned in the text of the post or in the link or video contained in the post.5 Roughly two-thirds of posts (68%) from liberal pages mentioned the coronavirus – more than twice the proportion as conservative pages (28%). There was a smaller difference in mentions of former President Donald Trump in posts. Conservative pages were somewhat less likely to mention Trump, who appeared in 15% of their posts, compared with 22% of posts on liberal pages.

Facebook posts and broader news coverage about early Biden days are similar on topic, less so on tone

This report also examines how Facebook posts about the new Biden administration compare with the stories examined in a recent Pew Research Center analysis of coverage of the administration by 25 news outlets drawn from television, radio and the web. To make as effective a comparison as possible, data from the previous analysis, which spanned the first 60 days of the new administration, were reanalyzed to include only the week of March 8-14, the same period in which these Facebook posts were studied. Coverage from this broader sample encompassed TV, radio and web stories from a wide range of sources from CNN to Newsmax and from The New York Times to the Washington Examiner.

Similar topics covered in Facebook posts as in broader coverage of Biden administrationLooking at the overall figures for that week (rather than ideology, which was assessed differently in these two samples), Facebook posts and broader coverage focused on the same topics at about the same rates, but there was a moderate difference between the tone of the stories from the earlier study and the social media posts.

The most common topic in each analysis was the economy – which was the focus of 28% of all the Facebook posts studied, modestly less than the 36% of stories in the broader media sample that were devoted to that subject. And the ranking of topics was similar as well, with the economy at the top spot followed by a mix of health care, immigration, political skills and appointments, although there was greater emphasis on immigration among the Facebook posts.

Posts on Facebook pages about Biden somewhat more negative than stories from broader coverageThe overall assessment of the new administration varied noticeably between the two groups.

In the sample of broader coverage during that week of March, a roughly equal proportion of stories carried a positive assessment (31%) as a negative assessment (28%) of the Biden administration. But Facebook posts were 15 percentage points more likely to have a negative than a positive assessment (36% vs. 21%).

For both posts and stories, however, a plurality of coverage was neither negative nor positive (44% of posts and 41% of stories).

Positive posts about Biden administration generated highest engagement

On average, positive Facebook posts about Biden administration generated more engagement than negative postsAmong all the Facebook posts studied, those with a positive assessment of the president or his administration received an average of about 13,800 interactions per post, 29% higher than the about 10,700 average interactions generated by posts with a negative assessment.6 This stands in contrast to previous Center research that found that negative YouTube videos and oppositional Facebook posts from members of Congress typically generated higher levels of engagement.

Comparing these popular Facebook pages by their self-described ideology, liberal pages, which also published far more positive posts about the administration, generated somewhat higher engagement per post than conservative pages. On average, posts about the administration in the week studied received roughly 12,500 interactions on liberal pages, about 11% more than posts from conservative pages (about 11,300).

Engagement for liberal pages was buoyed in part by the positive posts they published, which generated about 14,100 interactions on average, 27% higher than the average engagement generated by other posts from those pages (about 11,100 interactions). In contrast, conservative pages saw very little engagement difference between negative posts about the administration and their other posts (roughly 11,200 vs. 11,600 average interactions, respectively).

There were also different levels of engagement by topic. Among the five most common topics, posts about Biden’s political skills received about 20,000 interactions on average, compared with about 12,000 average interactions for posts about health care, about 10,900 interactions on posts about business and the economy, and fewer than 10,000 interactions on posts about the president’s nominations (9,600) or immigration (9,400).7

Mentions of Donald Trump in a post proved to be a major catalyst for engagement. Posts that did not mention Trump, on average, generated roughly 9,200 interactions, while those that included the former president had more than double that number – about 19,800.

Popular pages frequently linked to their own external content

Most Facebook pages published posts about Biden that had links and were more likely to link back to their own contentOverall, about six-in-ten Biden-related posts studied (59%) linked to a site outside of Facebook. However, self-identified conservative pages were far more likely to do so: 83% of posts from conservative pages included externallinks, compared with 29% of self-identified liberal pages.8

Many of these posts – especially on the conservative pages – linked to their own content rather than to content from another website (e.g., a post on the Pew Research Center Facebook page posting a link to pewresearch.org vs. another site). Overall, four-in-ten posts (40%) linked to their own content; this number rose to 72% for posts on conservative pages but was just 4% for posts on liberal pages.

(PEW)

JUNE 14, 2021

Source: https://www.journalism.org/2021/06/14/facebook-posts-in-early-days-of-biden-administration-reflect-ideological-divide/

 

695-696-43-21/Poll

Roughly Two-Thirds Of Atheists (65%) And Six-In-Ten Agnostics (57%) Either “Strongly” Or “Somewhat” Oppose The Death Penalty For People Convicted Of Murder

A majority of adults in the United States favor the death penalty for people convicted of murder, according to a recent Pew Research Center survey. However, views about the death penalty vary by religion – with atheists and agnostics opposing this form of punishment at about the same rate as Americans overall support it.

Atheists oppose the death penalty about as strongly as Protestants favor it

Roughly two-thirds of atheists (65%) and six-in-ten agnostics (57%) either “strongly” or “somewhat” oppose the death penalty for people convicted of murder. Atheists and agnostics are small religious groups, representing less than 10% of the adult population, but their share has grown in recent years.

Meanwhile, 60% of U.S. adults overall favor the death penalty, including 75% of White evangelical Protestants and 73% of White non-evangelical Protestants, according to the survey, which was conducted in early April. White Protestants account for about 29% of the U.S. population, a share that has shrunk in recent years.

How we did this

Atheists and agnostics are the only religious groups in this analysis that are more likely to oppose the death penalty than to support it. Groups with majorities in favor of executing convicted murderers include Hispanic Catholics (61%) and people who describe themselves, religiously, as “nothing in particular” (63%). Black Protestants are divided in their views on the death penalty, with 50% in favor and 47% opposed, mirroring a broader trend of lower support for the death penalty among Black Americans overall. 

Due to sample size limitations, this analysis does not include some smaller religious groups, including Jewish and Muslim Americans.

Views of the death penalty also differ by political orientation, race and age – characteristics that tend to vary between religious groups. For example, atheists are younger and more politically liberal than White evangelicals on average. Still, while these differences account for some of the variation across religious groups, religious differences in support for the death penalty remain even after accounting for these other traits.

In addition to exploring levels of support for the death penalty, the survey asked respondents whether they feel this form of punishment is morally justified, whether it acts as a deterrent, whether there are adequate safeguards to ensure that no innocent person is put to death, and whether sentencing for the same crime varies by race.

Again, on several of these questions, atheists and agnostics fall on one end of the spectrum and White Protestants on the other. Roughly half of atheists (51%) and agnostics (47%) say the death penalty is morally wrong, even for people who commit crimes like murder. Fewer than half as many White Protestants (22%) – evangelical and not evangelical – feel the same way, with more than three-quarters in these groups saying the death penalty is morally justified when someone commits a crime like murder.

Three-quarters of White Protestants say the death penalty is morally justified

White evangelical Protestants are also the only religious group in which a plurality (51%) say the death penalty deters people from committing serious crimes. By comparison, about half as many Black Protestants (27%) believe the death penalty acts as a deterrent. Generally speaking, people with any religious affiliation are more likely than those without one to say that the threat of the death penalty deters serious crimes: 39% of affiliated adults say this, compared with 26% of the unaffiliated.

Large majorities in every religious group say there is some risk that an innocent person will be put to death. However, White evangelical Protestants are more likely than any other group analyzed to say there are adequate safeguards in place to ensure that no innocent person will be put to death, with three-in-ten taking this position. Among religiously unaffiliated Americans, only about one-in-ten atheists and agnostics say adequate safeguards are in place to prevent innocent people from being executed. Unaffiliated people who say their religion is “nothing in particular” are twice as likely to say the same (20%).

There also are wide differences over whether the death penalty is applied equally by race. About nine-in-ten Black Protestants (88%) say Black people are more likely than White people to be sentenced to death for committing similar crimes, while nearly seven-in-ten White evangelicals (68%) say that White and Black people are equally likely to be sentenced to death. Roughly half of White non-evangelicals (53%) and Catholics (47%) believe the death penalty is applied equally between these two races

(PEW)

JUNE 15, 2021

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/06/15/unlike-other-u-s-religious-groups-most-atheists-and-agnostics-oppose-the-death-penalty/

 

695-696-43-22/Poll

Americans Lost More Years (5.5 Million) Of Life To Covid-19 In 2020 Than To All Accidents Combined In A Typical Year

About 600,000 Americans have died of COVID-19 since the coronavirus outbreak began. But behind that huge figure is a more nuanced one that brings the human toll of the virus into even sharper relief.

In addition to the overall number of deaths from a given cause, researchers can estimate the number of “life years” lost due to it – a statistic that takes life expectancy into account. For example, if a person with a life expectancy of 80 dies at age 50, they are estimated to have lost 30 years of life. Examining this statistic underscores the extent to which the virus has cut Americans’ lives short.

COVID-19 caused an estimated loss of nearly  5.5 million years of life in the U.S. in 2020

In 2020 alone, the coronavirus was responsible for about 380,000 deaths and roughly 5.5 million years of lost life in the United States, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of provisional data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That number of life years lost is more than the number lost in a typical calendar year to all accidents combined – including traffic accidents, drownings, firearm accidents, drug overdoses and other poisonings – and more than triple the number of life years lost in a normal calendar year due to liver disease or diabetes.

(This analysis compares provisional 2020 data for coronavirus deaths with final 2019 data for all other causes of death. We took this approach for several reasons: Only provisional data is currently available for COVID-19 deaths in 2020; detailed provisional data is not currently available for all other causes of death in 2020; and the pandemic affected mortality patterns for non-coronavirus causes in 2020, too. That makes 2019 a suitable comparison point for the typical number of deaths from various causes in a given year.

COVID-19 deaths caused an average loss of 14 life years

The same figures reveal that the average number of life years lost per U.S. coronavirus death in 2020 was 14 years. This is comparable to the average number of years lost per heart disease death in the U.S. in 2019 (13 years) and somewhat lower than the average number of years lost per cancer or diabetes death that year (17 years). But it is far below the average number of years lost per liver disease (24 years) or accidental death (31 years).

Life expectancy increases with age

The large number of life years lost due to COVID-19 in 2020 may not be widely appreciated because people ages 65 and older account for a large majority (approximately 80%) of U.S. coronavirus deaths to date. Some observers have raised the point that the public may believe that these older Americans were nearing the end of their lives anyway.

But life expectancy statistics tell a different story. In fact, life expectancy increases with age. While babies born in the U.S. today can expect to live to be 79, Americans who are 65 today can expect to live to 85, according to the United Nations World Population Prospects. Current 80-year-olds, in turn, can expect to live to an average age of 90.

Life expectancy in U.S. increases with age

The pandemic, in other words, has killed many Americans who otherwise might have expected to live for years or even decades longer. A 65-year-old who dies from COVID-19 might ordinarily have expected to live until 85 – a difference of two decades, or roughly a quarter of the average American’s total expected life span at birth.

Average life spans change with age as common causes of death shift over time. By the time a U.S. adult lives to 65, they are unlikely to die from some common causes of death among younger people, such as homicide, pregnancy complications or congenital diseases. At the same time, older Americans are more likely than their younger counterparts to die from causes including heart disease, Alzheimer’s – and now COVID-19.

(PEW)

JUNE 16, 2021

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/06/16/americans-lost-more-years-of-life-to-covid-19-in-2020-than-to-all-accidents-combined-in-a-typical-year/

 

695-696-43-23/Poll

The Percentage Of Americans Who Believe That Religion Is Increasing Its Influence On American Life Has Retreated To 16%, In Line With Pre-Pandemic Levels

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- After doubling last spring and staying elevated in December, the percentage of Americans who believe that religion is increasing its influence on American life has retreated to 16%, in line with pre-pandemic levels.

https://content.gallup.com/origin/gallupinc/GallupSpaces/Production/Cms/POLL/exs8xkekwki8bxrwf1uloq.png

Line graph. Sixteen percent of U.S. adults say religion is increasing its influence on American life, down from 38% in May 2020 and 27% in December 2020. In late 2018 and late 2019, a consistent 19% said religion was increasing its influence.

Eighty-two percent of U.S. adults now say religion is losing its influence, up from 58% in April 2020.

The latest results are based on Gallup's annual Values and Beliefs poll, conducted May 3-18. The 2020 spike could have been a reaction to the coronavirus pandemic, as Americans likely perceived people were turning to religion to help them cope with the crisis.

Every major subgroup of Americans showed an increased belief that religion was becoming more influential in U.S. life last year, followed by a sharp decline in those attitudes this year. As a result, nearly every group has views that are similar today to what they were in 2019. Two notable exceptions are Republicans and Americans with no religious preference, as both are now less likely to perceive religion as influential.

Recent Changes in Perceptions That Religion Is Increasing Its Influence on American Life, by Subgroup

2019

Apr 2020

May 2021

Increase,
2019 to 2020

Decrease,
2020 to 2021

%

%

%

pct. pts.

pct. pts.

U.S. adults

19

38

16

+19

-22

Men

16

33

14

+17

-19

Women

21

43

18

+22

-25

White adults

17

37

13

+20

-24

Non-White adults

22

41

22

+19

-19

18-29 years old

20

40

19

+20

-21

30-49 years old

19

39

16

+20

-23

50-64 years old

19

39

15

+20

-24

65+ years old

15

34

16

+19

-18

College graduate

17

34

15

+17

-19

College nongraduate

19

40

17

+21

-23

Married

17

36

12

+19

-24

Not married

20

40

19

+20

-21

Children under 18

18

41

17

+23

-24

No children under 18

18

37

15

+19

-22

Republican

18

44

7

+26

-37

Independent

17

33

19

+16

-14

Democrat

21

37

20

+16

-17

Protestant

18

43

15

+25

-28

Catholic

19

35

19

+16

-16

No religion

20

31

13

+11

-18

Attend church weekly

23

46

21

+23

-25

Attend church monthly

18

43

13

+25

-30

Seldom/Never attend church

17

32

15

+15

-17

Figures for 2019 are based on an average of two surveys.

GALLUP

Perceptions of Religious Influence Near Record Low

Gallup has asked Americans to say whether religion is becoming more influential for more than 60 years, including at least annually since 1997. The current 16% who see religion as increasing its influence is just two percentage points above the historical low point -- 14%, registered in 1969 and 1970 polls.

For most of the trend, less than a majority of Americans have said that religion is increasing its influence. One major exception came in the wake of the 9/11 terrorist attacks in late 2001, when a record-high 71% of U.S. adults thought religion was becoming more influential as the nation dealt with that crisis and threat to safety. The 32-point increase in 2001 before and after 9/11 is the only surge in Gallup's trend bigger than the 19-point jump seen last year.

https://content.gallup.com/origin/gallupinc/GallupSpaces/Production/Cms/POLL/ilj89eahju-0jf1ifpstkw.png

Line graph. In the more than 60 years Gallup has asked Americans whether religion is increasing its influence on American life, there have been only a few instances in which at least half have agreed. These include 69% in 1957, 71% in 2001 and 50% in 2005. Currently, 16% say it is increasing its influence.

Bottom Line

Americans have long thought that religion is losing rather than increasing its influence on U.S. society, but those views eased last year as the U.S. dealt with the onset of the coronavirus pandemic. Now, with many Americans vaccinated against the disease and COVID-19 infections falling, U.S. public opinion on the influence of religion has returned to pre-pandemic levels, sitting just slightly above the historical low point.

These results come as more Americans attend church in person than did so a year ago, but at a time when reports of church attendance still lag behind what they were before the pandemic and remain lower than in previous decades. Additionally, the percentage of U.S. adults who belong to a formal place of worship has fallen below the majority level for the first time. With increasing numbers of U.S. adults, particularly young adults, lacking a religious affiliation, the likelihood of religion becoming more influential seems low. However, as Gallup's trends show, in times of national crisis Americans perceive that religion is becoming more influential, at least temporarily.

(Gallup USA)

JUNE 21, 2021

Source: https://news.gallup.com/poll/351329/pandemic-eases-fewer-religion-gaining-influence.aspx

 

695-696-43-24/Poll

45% Of Gen Z Adults And 40% Of Millennials Have Interacted With Content On Social Platforms That Focuses On The Need For Action On Climate Change

Gen Z and Millennial social media users are more likely than older generations online to engage with climate change content on social media and to express a range of emotions when they see climate-related content there – including anxiety about the future and anger that not enough is being done, according to a new Pew Research Center survey.

Gen Z and Millennial social media users engage more with climate change content, react more strongly to it

Younger adults have taken on prominent roles in efforts to stop climate change, with groups and individuals such as climate activist Greta Thunberg and the Sunrise Movement among those working to address the issue.

Among U.S. social media users, 45% of Gen Z adults and 40% of Millennials have interacted with content on social platforms that focuses on the need for action on climate change by following an account, liking or commenting on a post, or posting or sharing content about the need for action on climate change. By contrast, much smaller shares of Gen X (27%) and Baby Boomer and older social media users (21%) have engaged with content about climate change in any of these ways.

The generations defined

Gen Z adults, born after 1996, have lived their whole lives in an internet and social media era. These young adults, along with the Millennial generation, were among the first to incorporate social media use into their everyday lives and are much more likely than older generations to say they are online “almost constantly.”

Gen Zers and Millennials express intense emotional reactions to seeing climate change content on social platforms compared with older generations. For instance, majorities of Gen Z (69%) and Millennial social media users (59%) say it made them feel anxious about the future the last time they saw content on social media about addressing climate change. Fewer than half of Gen X (46%) and Baby Boomer and older social media users (41%) say they felt this way the last time they saw climate content. Similarly, Gen Zers and Millennials are more likely than older social media users to say they felt angry the last time they saw climate content because not enough is being done to address the issue.

Generations also differ when it comes to positive emotional reactions: 54% of Gen Z and 53% of Millennial social media users say they felt motivated to learn more about climate change issues the last time they saw climate content on social platforms, compared with 43% of Gen X and 39% of Baby Boomer and older users. 

Climate-engaged social media users express more urgency about action on climate change, offer broader policy support to break with fossil fuels

Those social media users who engage with climate change content online – a group that skews younger than the general population – stand out from those who do not engage online in their views about a range of climate-related policies.

Among climate-engaged social media users, 73% favor phasing out the production of new gasoline-powered cars and trucks by the year 2035, and 54% think the U.S. should phase out the use of fossil fuels in energy production entirely. By contrast, much smaller shares of social media users who do not engage with climate content support either of these two proposals (39% and 27%, respectively).

And when it comes to the approach of the Biden administration on climate issues, a majority of the social media climate-engaged (58%) think the administration will not go far enough to reduce the effects of climate change; far fewer among social media users who do not engage with climate content express this view (36%).

(PEW)

JUNE 21, 2021

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/06/21/on-social-media-gen-z-and-millennial-adults-interact-more-with-climate-change-content-than-older-generations/

 

695-696-43-25/Poll

About Four-In-Ten Adults With Lower Incomes Do Not Have Home Broadband Services (43%) Or A Desktop Or Laptop Computer (41%)

More than 30 years after the debut of the World Wide Web, internet use, broadband adoption and smartphone ownership have grown rapidly for all Americans – including those who are less well-off financially. However, the digital lives of Americans with lower and higher incomes remain markedly different, according to a Pew Research Center survey of U.S. adults conducted Jan. 25-Feb. 8, 2021. In fact, the shares of Americans in each income tier who have home broadband or a smartphone have not significantly changed from 2019 to 2021.

Americans with lower incomes have lower levels of technology adoption

Roughly a quarter of adults with household incomes below $30,000 a year (24%) say they don’t own a smartphone. About four-in-ten adults with lower incomes do not have home broadband services (43%) or a desktop or laptop computer (41%). And a majority of Americans with lower incomes are not tablet owners. By comparison, each of these technologies is nearly ubiquitous among adults in households earning $100,000 or more a year.

Americans with higher household incomes are also more likely to have multiple devices that enable them to go online. Roughly six-in-ten adults living in households earning $100,000 or more a year (63%) report having home broadband services, a smartphone, a desktop or laptop computer and a tablet, compared with 23% of those living in lower-income households.

Conversely, 13% of adults with household incomes below $30,000 a year do not have access to any of these technologies at home, while only 1% of adults from households making $100,000 or more a year report a similar lack of access.

The share of Americans with lower incomes who rely on their smartphones for going online has roughly doubled since 2013

With fewer options for online access at their disposal, Americans with lower incomes are relying more on smartphones. As of early 2021, 27% of adults living in households earning less than $30,000 a year are smartphone-only internet users – meaning they own a smartphone but do not have broadband internet at home. This represents a substantial increase from 12% in 2013. In contrast, only 6% of those living in households earning $100,000 or more fall into this category in 2021. These shares are statistically unchanged since 2019, when the Center last polled on this topic.

This reliance on smartphones also means that the less affluent are more likely to use them for tasks traditionally reserved for larger screens. For example, smartphone owners with lower incomes were especially likely to use their mobile device when seeking out and applying for jobs, according to a 2015 Pew Research Center report.

The disparity in online access is also apparent in what has been called the “homework gap” – the gap between school-age children who have access to high-speed internet at home and those who don’t. In 2015, 35% of lower-income households with school-age children did not have a broadband internet connection at home, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data.

The digital divide has been a central topic in tech circles for decades, with researchers, advocates and policymakers examining this issue. However, this topic has gained special attention during the coronavirus outbreak as much of daily life (such as work and school) moved online, leaving families with lower incomes more likely to face obstacles in navigating this increasing digital environment. For example, in April 2020, 59% of parents with lower incomes who had children in schools that were remote due to the pandemic said their children would likely face at least one of three digital obstacles to their schooling, such as a lack of reliable internet at home, no computer at home, or needing to use a smartphone to complete schoolwork.

(PEW)

JUNE 22, 2021

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/06/22/digital-divide-persists-even-as-americans-with-lower-incomes-make-gains-in-tech-adoption/

 

695-696-43-26/Poll

Nearly Nine-In-Ten U.S. Adults Who Were Raised Jewish (88%) Are Still Jewish Today

The American Jewish population, like other religious groups, is in constant flux. Some people who were raised as Jews have left the religion, while some who were raised outside the faith now identify with it. Many others have switched denominations within Judaism – a trend that has seen the Reform movement grow modestly and Conservative Judaism experience a net loss, according to a recent Pew Research Center survey.

Overall, nearly nine-in-ten U.S. adults who were raised Jewish (88%) are still Jewish today. This includes 70% who identify with the Jewish religion and 18% who don’t identify with any religion but who consider themselves Jewish in some other way, such as culturally, ethnically or by family background.

88% of adults who were raised Jewish are still Jewish

On the other hand, 12% of U.S. adults who were raised as Jewish are no longer Jewish, including 5% who are now Christians.

The “retention rate” is higher among people who say they were brought up in the Jewish religion than it is among those who were raised as atheist, agnostic or no particular religion, but who had a Jewish parent and were raised as Jewish in some other way, such as culturally or ethnically. Nine-in-ten of these “Jews by religion” are still Jewish today, compared with 76% of those were raised as “Jews of no religion.”

How do these figures compare with the retention rates of other religious groups? We don’t have an exact apples-to-apples comparison because Jews view their identity as a matter not just of religion but also of ancestry and culture. Other U.S. religious groups, such as Protestants and Catholics, are defined in Pew Research Center surveys solely by identification with a religion. (That is why there is a “Jews of no religion” category but not a “Protestants of no religion” category, for example.)

Given this imbalance, perhaps the fairest comparison focuses on the percentage of people raised as Jews by religion who are still Jews by religion (76%). That figure is roughly on par with the retention rates among U.S. Hindus and Muslims and higher than the retention rates among evangelical Protestants and Catholics, according to the Center’s 2014 U.S. Religious Landscape Study. It’s important to note, however, that the 2014 survey was conducted by telephone, unlike the new survey of U.S. Jews, which was conducted online and by mail. Changes in survey mode can affect results.

Switching has resulted in gains for some branches of Judaism

Within Judaism, denominational switching has led to the largest net losses for the Conservative movement, which, in the 1950s and 1960s, was the largest branch of American Jewry.

For every person who has joined Conservative Judaism, about three have left the denomination

In the new survey, a quarter of adults who are currently Jewish or were raised that way say they were brought up in Conservative Judaism, while 15% identify as Conservative Jews today. For every person who has joined Conservative Judaism, nearly three people who were raised in the Conservative movement have left it.

By contrast, Reform Judaism – now the largest American Jewish denomination – has experienced a net gain due to religious switching; 28% of current or former U.S. Jews say they were raised as Reform Jews, while 33% currently identify with the Reform movement.

Jews with no denominational affiliation also have experienced a net gain. About one-in-six current or former U.S. Jews (17%) say they were raised in no particular branch of Judaism, while 29% currently identify with no branch. For every person who has left this group (either to join another branch or to leave Judaism altogether), nearly three people have joined the ranks of U.S. Jews who do not affiliate with any particular Jewish denomination.

Meanwhile, one-in-ten current or former U.S. Jews say they were raised in Orthodox Judaism, and  8% currently identify as Orthodox. Despite this small net loss from denominational switching, some social scientists project that the Orthodox share of the Jewish population is likely to increase in the future, because Orthodox Jews are younger and have a higher fertility rate than non-Orthodox Jews, on average.

Orthodox and Reform Judaism have the highest retention rates

Another way of examining changes in denominational affiliation is to calculate retention rates: Among adults who were raised in a given branch of Judaism, what percentage still identify with that branch today? And where did the rest go?

About two-thirds of adults raised as Orthodox or Reform Jews still identify with those branches

Orthodox and Reform Judaism have the highest retention rates of the three major branches. Two-thirds of adults who were raised as Orthodox (67%) and Reform Jews (65%) still identify with those branches, respectively. The retention rate of Conservative Judaism is lower: About four-in-ten people raised as Conservative Jews (42%) continue to identify with Conservative Judaism as adults.

Adults who no longer identify with their childhood denomination tend to have moved in the direction of less traditional, more theologically liberal forms of Judaism – or to have left Judaism altogether – rather than in the direction of more traditional branches. For example, 57% of people raised within Conservative Judaism now either identify with Reform Judaism (30%), don’t identify with any particular branch of Judaism (15%) or are no longer Jewish (7%), while only 2% now identify with Orthodox Judaism.

Many Reform Jews were raised in more traditional branches

Yet another way of looking at denominational switching is to calculate “accession rates”: Among adults who identify with a given branch of Judaism today, what percentage were not raised in that branch, and where did they come from?

A quarter of Reform Jews were raised in either Conservative or Orthodox Judaism

Most Orthodox Jewish adults (85%) and Conservative Jewish adults (68%) were raised in their current denomination. In other words, just 15% of today’s Orthodox Jews came from outside Orthodoxy, including 5% who were raised as Conservative and 2% who were raised as Reform. Meanwhile, about a third of today’s Conservative Jews (32%) were not raised in that movement, including 6% who were brought up as Orthodox and 8% who were raised as Reform.

The Reform movement has a somewhat higher accession rate. Nearly half (46%) of today’s Reform Jews have come from outside the Reform movement. A quarter of today’s Reform Jews were raised as either Conservative (22%) or Orthodox (3%).

The group with the highest accession rate, however, is Jews with no denominational affiliation. Two-thirds (66%) of adults in this category were raised in other groups, including 13% who were raised as Conservative Jews, 14% who were raised as Reform Jews and 33% who say they were not raised as Jewish at all (though most say they had a Jewish parent).

A relatively small proportion of respondents identify as Jewish today but say they did not have a Jewish parent and were not raised Jewish in any way. This group makes up 8% of adult Conservative Jews, 7% of Reform Jews, 2% of Jews with no denominational affiliation and 1% of Orthodox Jews. The survey did not ask whether they have gone through a formal Jewish conversion.

(PEW)

JUNE 22, 2021

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/06/22/denominational-switching-among-u-s-jews-reform-judaism-has-gained-conservative-judaism-has-lost/

 

695-696-43-27/Poll

About Six-In-Ten U.S Adults (63%) Have A “Very” Or “Mostly” Favorable Opinion Of Pope Francis

Pope Francis’ popularity dropped in the United States a few years ago amid a sex abuse crisis in the U.S. Catholic Church. But Americans’ opinions of the pontiff have since rebounded, and between February 2020 and March 2021 – 13 months that included moves by Francis to expand the role of women in the church as well as a widening debate about whether President Joe Biden should be denied Communion – views toward Francis remained fairly stable.

About six-in-ten U.S adults (63%) have a “very” or “mostly” favorable opinion of Pope Francis, according to a Pew Research Center survey conducted in March using the Center’s online American Trends Panel. This is nearly identical to the share of adults who had a favorable view of Francis in February 2020 (64%).

The pope’s favorability also has remained steady among U.S. Catholics, with 82% of Catholics in both the March 2021 and February 2020 surveys saying they have a favorable opinion of the pope.

These March 2021 and February 2020 results are not entirely comparable to figures from earlier surveys the Center conducted by telephone. Online and phone surveys sometimes produce disparate results, a polling phenomenon called a mode effect. One key difference is that online polls tend to result in fewer respondents declining to answer the question if there are fewer opportunities to express “no opinion.” This analysis indicates that any change in the results between January 2020 (when this question was last asked on the phone) and March 2021 was likely due to fewer people declining to give an opinion on the web survey.

Six-in-ten U.S. adults view Pope Francis favorably

How does the shift from phone to web surveys affect opinions of Pope Francis?

Catholic Democrats continue to be more supportive of Francis than Catholic Republicans

Views of Pope Francis have remained fairly stable among Catholic subgroups, too. For example, Catholics who identify as Democrats or who lean toward that party continue to have a more positive opinion of Francis than their Republican counterparts, a partisan pattern that has held since 2018. In the latest survey, 90% of Catholic Democrats expressed a favorable opinion of the pope, compared with 73% of Catholic Republicans and GOP leaners.

Moreover, the latest survey finds little difference in opinions of Francis among Catholics who attend Mass regularly and those who go less often – consistent with patterns seen in previous years. Among weekly Mass-goers, 84% said in March that they have a very or mostly favorable opinion of the pope, as did 82% of Catholics who attend Mass less often, including those who say they never go.

Religious ‘nones,’ White non-evangelical Protestants largely view Francis favorably

Among non-Catholics, views about Pope Francis also have not changed much. In the March survey, majorities of White Protestants who do not identify as evangelical (70%), religiously unaffiliated adults (61%) and Black Protestants (60%) say they have a favorable opinion of him. White evangelical Protestants are more divided in their opinion of the pontiff, with similar shares expressing favorable (45%) and unfavorable (47%) views. Due to sample size limitations, this analysis does not separately report on some smaller religious groups, including Jewish and Muslim Americans.

(PEW)

JUNE 25, 2021

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/06/25/americans-including-catholics-continue-to-have-favorable-views-of-pope-francis/

 

695-696-43-28/Poll

The Housing Crisis In Canada: Three-Quarters (75%) Of Canadians Who Don’t Own A Home But Want To Buy One, Say They Can’t Afford To

Toronto, Ontario, June 16, 2021 — A new Ipsos poll conducted on behalf of Manulife Bank reveals that there might be an affordability crisis in Canada, with many struggling to keep up with the cost of living or admitting that home ownership has become a pipe dream for them. The situation has developed into a tragedy for many prospective homeowners, as three-quarters (75%) of those who do not own a home but want to buy one feel like they can’t afford to do so. What’s more, most (71%) of those who do not own a home worry about saving up for one, including four in ten (39%) who worry a lot about this.

Even many of those who were able to purchase a home, struggled to do so. As many as one in three (33%) Canadian homeowners (aged 20-69, HHOLD income $40k+) admit they needed help from their parents, when purchasing their first home. The younger generations in particular are having more difficulty purchasing their first home, as nearly half of all Gen Z (aged 18-24) and Millennial (aged 25-40) homeowners needed help from their parents. The older generations have felt the strain, as well, with nearly one in ten (7%) claiming to have helped their adult children purchase a home, during the pandemic. Five percent (5%) of those with a mortgage even went one step further and used equity from their own home to help their adult children purchase a home.

The survey yields evidence suggesting that wages might not be keeping up with inflation, as three in five (61%) Canadians (aged 20-69, HHOLD income $40k+) report that the cost of living for their household has increased, over the past year, and half (51%) of those with mortgages worry about making the payments. Two-thirds (67%) worry about housing prices in their local community, suggesting that many can no longer afford to purchase a home in the community in which they live and would have to move elsewhere, to do so. Given the current housing market situation, it follows that a vast majority (85%) of those who have young children are worried about the future affordability of real-estate for their children when they are ready for home ownership.

While there are plenty of reasons to be concerned about the affordability of life in Canada, the data suggests many could be doing a better job at financial planning and management. Indeed, most (72%) Canadians (aged 20-69, HHOLD income $40k+) do not have a written financial plan. And only about one-third (35%) of those who are in debt have an established strategy to repay their debts.

(Ipsos Canada)

17 June 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-ca/housing-crisis-canada-three-quarters-75-canadians-who-dont-own-home-want-buy-one-say-they-cant

 

695-696-43-29/Poll

Eight In Ten (82%) Canadians Vaccinated Or Awaiting Vaccine; Remaining 18% Need To Be Convinced

Toronto, ON, June 18, 2021 – Prime Minister Trudeau introduced the phrase ‘one-dose summer’ to Canadians’ vocabulary in mid-May, raising hopes of this summer being a return to some kind of normal, but dependent on the state of vaccination across the country. A recent Ipsos poll on behalf of Global News has found while over eight in ten (83%) Canadians adults say they have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine or are interested in getting vaccinated, there remains a sizeable portion still hesitant to roll up their sleeves. Vaccine hesitancy remains a challenge to the large-scale public health effort underway in hospitals, pharmacies, convention centres, and stadia all over the country.

 

Five Million Adults May Go Unvaccinated, Especially Women and Younger Canadians

The poll found that nearly three-quarters (73%) of Canadian adults say they have received at least one dose of a vaccine and another 10% say that they would like to be vaccinated. With the most recent data from the Government of Canada indicating that 70% of those aged 12 years and older have received at least one dose,[1] these findings are in line with overall population trends.

However, the remaining two in ten (18%) are vaccine hesitant, meaning that they are either unsure whether they will get the vaccine (9%) or that they are ‘definitely not’ getting the vaccine (9%). This skepticism (or in some cases flat-out refusal) means that as many as five million adult Canadians may not receive the vaccine, posing a major challenge to mass vaccination efforts.

Women are more likely than men to express these vaccine-hesitant attitudes (20% v. 14%) and are also more likely to say that they are ‘definitely not’ getting the vaccine (11% v. 6%). In addition, younger Canadians are also showing signs of being more hesitant towards the COVID-19 vaccine than older age groups. Self-reported vaccination rates in younger age groups trail behind those of older age groups, partially due to the vaccine only being available very recently to these groups. However, even when accounting for these who say they have not yet been vaccinated but want to be, a quarter (25%) of Canadians aged 18-34 express reluctance towards the COVID-19 vaccine, compared to 18% of those aged 35-54 and 11% of those aged 55+ years.

 

Have you received a vaccination against COVID-19?

 

Male

Female

18-34 years

35-54 years

55+ years

No, and I am still unsure as to whether I’ll get the vaccine

8%

9%

15%

11%

2%

No, and I’m definitely not getting the vaccine

6%

11%

10%

7%

9%

Total Vaccine Hesitant

14%

20%

25%

18%

11%


Atlantic Canada’s relatively low COVID-19 case count may be a contributing factor to why a quarter (26%) of those living there are unsure as to whether they’ll get the vaccine, though few (5%) in the region say they will outright refuse to be vaccinated. While Alberta has a slightly smaller proportion of adults saying they are either unsure of or refusing to get the vaccine (22%), it has a higher proportion of those saying they will choose to not be vaccinated (10%). Resistance to the vaccine seems to be highest in British Columbia, where 12% of adults say they are ‘definitely not’ getting the vaccine.

 

How High Can We Go?

As shipments of vaccines continue to arrive, the question remains as to how high of a vaccination rate can Canada achieve. This aversion may be rooted in concerns ranging from personal religious beliefs to skepticism towards a vaccine that was developed and approved so quickly.

When presented with various incentives, such as a chance to win $1 million in a lottery, cash reward valued at $100, and a paid day off from work, roughly half of unvaccinated Canadians could be convinced to change their minds.

 

Incentives to Motivate Getting a COVID-19 Vaccine

(among those having not yet received a vaccine dose)

Incentive

Yes/Maybe

No

Chance to win $1 million in a lottery

55%

(35% yes, 21% maybe)

45%

Chance to win $100,000 in a lottery

54%

(31% yes, 23% maybe)

46%

Cash or a reward valued at $100

57%

(32% yes, 25% maybe)

43%

Cash or a reward valued at $50

53%

(30% yes, 23% maybe)

47%

Cash or a reward valued at $25

47%

(25% yes, 22% maybe)

53%

Paid day off work from employer

48%

(27% yes, 21% maybe)

52%

 

If offered a chance at an Alberta-style lottery drawing of $1 million, over one-third (35%) say they would get the vaccine, with another 21% saying that they maybe would get vaccinated. This means that 45% of unvaccinated Canadians would still turn down the chance to become a millionaire if it meant getting the COVID-19 vaccine. Manitoba has opted for a similar approach, but instead offering several prizes of $100,000. If offered this option, three in ten (31%) unvaccinated Canadians would choose to get the vaccine, with another 25% who could be swayed.

Even if unvaccinated Canadians may not be the gambling type, preferring instead a guaranteed payout instead of entering a lottery, only one-third (32%) say a cash or reward valued at $100 would be enough for them to get the vaccine and another 25% say they could be convinced. This leaves 43% of those who have not yet received the COVID-19 vaccine saying they could not even be motivated to do so by a guaranteed payment of $100.

As Canada tries to break records in terms of proportion of the population that is vaccinated, the fact that a significant number of individuals appear to be unmoved by monetary incentives hints at underlying barriers to vaccination for a small minority of Canadians that may not be so easily overcome.

(Ipsos Canada)

18 June 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-ca/news-polls/Eight-in-Ten-Canadians-Vaccinated-Remaining-Need-Convinced

 

695-696-43-30/Poll

Half (51%) Of Canadians Anxious About Returning To Normal Life Following The Pandemic, Though Cautious Optimism Evident

Toronto, ON, June 19, 2021 – Summer 2021 has many of the markers of a typical Canadian summer: daylight hours are getting longer, the school year is ending, and restaurant patios are opening. However, the COVID-19 pandemic has had a lasting impact on Canadians, though there is evidence that the country has cautious optimism about moving forward over the coming months.

A recent Ipsos poll on conducted on behalf of Global News finds that half (51%) of Canadians feel nervous about resuming normal activities post-pandemic, and a third (35%) feel their province is re-opening too quickly, suggesting that there may be a ways to go before we truly feel “normal” again, and mixed feelings when it comes to changes many may have been looking forward to for over a year.

 

Canadians Anxious about Returning to New Normal, Despite Recent Improvements in Mental Health

Ipsos data shows that Canadians are divided on how they feel about returning to normal life: half (51%) of Canadians agree that they feel anxious about resuming normal activities, while 49% disagree. Notably, those in Quebec are more likely to feel relaxed about their new normal (only 36% report feeling anxious about resuming normal activities vs. 51% SK/MB, 51% ATL, 53% AB, 56% ON, 62% BC), in line with many of the province’s major urban areas having recently moved into the second-lowest stage of COVID-19 alert (and all other areas in the lowest).

There is also a pronounced difference by age when it comes to anxiety about the future: younger people are more likely to say they feel anxious about resuming normal activities: (58% among ages 18-34 v. 47% 35-54, 50% 55+). Greater likelihood among older Canadians to have more stable income, more developed social support networks, and employment stability or flexibility may have contributed to the confidence among this group when it comes to mental health impacts of the pandemic.

Despite these feelings of anxiety, a majority of Canadians have noticed a difference in their mental health as the country begins to return to the “new normal”: 71% reported that their mental health is improving as vaccinations become more widespread and things re-open. This is positive news considering half of Canadians are considered “high risk” in terms of mental health, according to recent Ipsos data from March 2021.[1]

 

Most Confident in Upcoming Plans, Younger Canadians More Hesitant

Seven in ten (68%) Canadians agree that they are confident in their province’s reopening plan, though not emphatically – while 54% say they somewhat agree, just 13% say they strongly agree, suggesting a cautious optimism about the future. Women (75%) report feeling more confident than men (61%) in their province’s reopening plan. Those in Quebec (84%), British Columbia (81%), and Atlantic Canada (76%) are significantly more likely to agree that they are confident in their province’s reopening plan compared to other regions, especially Alberta (43%) and those in the Prairies (Saskatchewan and Manitoba, 53%).

Younger people were again more likely to be cautious: 60% of those aged 18-34 feel confident in their province’s reopening plan, a lower portion than among those in older age groups (70% 35-54, 71% 55+).

In addition to feeling confident in their province’s plan, most Canadians also feel comfortable with the pace of reopening (65%), though a third (35%) of Canadians feel that their province is reopening too fast. Consistent with the tentative confidence surrounding reopening plans, sentiment is not extreme; there are relatively few (19%) who strongly disagree that their province is re-opening too fast.

However, there are key regional differences about the pace of reopening, in line with the different experiences with COVID-19 across the country. Compared to the rest of Canada, in which the portion of those agreeing that their province is re-opening too fast ranges between 30% and 38%, over half (53%) of those in Alberta feel the reopening is happening too quickly. This caution among Albertans is unsurprising, given their recent experiences with high COVID-19 caseloads over the last year, and the potential contradiction between having a significant COVID-19 caseload in early 2021 while also having a re-opening target of early June.

Contrary to the idea that younger Canadians may be eager to return to socializing in public venues, younger people are also more likely to feel that their province is reopening too fast (44% agree) compared to those in older age groups, especially those ages 55 and older, among whom 29% agreed that their province is reopening too fast. Younger Canadians’ hesitancy about reopening overall may be, in part, explained by their greater likelihood to be returning to school, to be among those working essential, front-line services in retail, and to be last in line when it comes to receiving their vaccines compared to older age groups.

 

Canadians Negotiating What Measures Are Needed for the Return to Work

For many, the return to normal also means a return to the office. Over half (56%) of working Canadians agreed that their workplace should make vaccination a condition of employment. However, when it comes to other safety measures, including working from home regularly, there is only lukewarm agreement. Three in ten (28%) of Canadians agree that if their workplace doesn’t allow them to work from home at least once a week, they would consider quitting. Younger Canadians were far more likely to feel strongly about work from home measures for returning to work post-COVID: 42% of those aged 18-35 agreed that if their workplace does not allow them to work from home at least once a week, they would consider quitting. Compared to the national average, this suggests that upcoming generations of workers will want to see greater flexibility in their working arrangements into the future and may be more willing to take a hard stance if needed.

(Ipsos Canada)

19 June 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-ca/news-polls/Half-Canadians-Anxious-Returning-Normal-Life-Following-Pandemic

 

695-696-43-31/Poll

One Quarter Of Canadians (26%) Are Not Confident That Their Family Would Be Able To Pay For Mortgage/Rent/Housing Costs, If They Were To Pass Away

Toronto, ON, June 22, 2021 — Over the course of the pandemic, Canadians admit they are having more frequent conversations about important topics. According to a recent survey study done by Ipsos, over half of Canadian parents (56%) are having more frequent conversations about their children’s future. Additional conversations include concerns about finances/financial goals/debt (38%), and family’s financial security if they were to pass away (28%).

The survey found that six in ten (63%) believe insurance coverage is a way to take control over an unpredictable situation. However, more than one-third (35%) of Canadians say they do not have life insurance.

Lack of Financial Confidence

While a majority of Canadians express confidence in their family’s ability to manage financially without them, if they were to pass away without life insurance, there remains a significant portion of Canadians who are not confident in their family’s ability to manage. A quarter (26%) of Canadians are not confident their family would be able to pay for the mortgage/rent/housing costs if they were to pass away.

Those aged 35-54 are the least confident in their family’s ability in paying for things such as childcare expenses (33%), housing costs (32%), food, clothing, and other necessities (22%).

Understanding Life Insurance

Over the course of the past year, a third (28%) of Canadians indicate they have been evaluating their insurance coverage. However, many Canadians still do not understand the different types of life insurance policies that are available to them. Nearly four in ten do not understand term life insurance (38%) or whole life/permanent life insurance (39%). The knowledge gap becomes larger for universal life insurance and term-to-100 life insurance. A majority do not understand universal life insurance (51%), or term-to-100 (56%).

(Ipsos Canada)

22 June 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-ca/news-polls/one-quarter-of-canadians-are-not-confident-that-their-family-would-be-able-to-pay-for-mortgage-rent-housing-costs

 

AUSTRALIA

695-696-43-32/Poll

Over 2 Million Australians Are Now Reading Puzzle Magazines – Up An Exceptional 492,000 (+30.8%) From A Year Ago

New research from Roy Morgan shows puzzle magazines are now read by over 2 million Australians aged 14+ in an average month, a significant increase of 492,000 (+30.8%) from a year ago and the growth is driven by Millennials and Generation Z.

Leading puzzle magazines are often closely associated with a higher circulation magazine such as Take 5, Australian Women’s Weekly, Woman’s Day, Better Homes and Gardens, That’s Life and New Idea and help to raise the profile, and readership, of the primary magazine.

Leading puzzle magazines measured include Take 5 Mega Puzzler, Take 5 Pocket Puzzler, Australian Women’s Weekly Puzzle Book, Woman’s Day Superpuzzler, Better Homes and Gardens Puzzle Book, That’s Life Bumper Puzzle, That’s Life Puzzler on the Go, New Idea Jumbo Puzzler, New Idea Mr. Wisdom’s Whopper and Lovatts Puzzle Magazines.

Women are the biggest readers of puzzle magazines, but men are up most from a year ago

Women are the most avid readers of puzzle magazines – now read by 1,268,000 women, up 173,000 (+15.8%) from a year ago. However, readership of puzzle magazines by men has increased far faster and is up by 320,000 (+63.5%) to 824,000.

Roy Morgan’s readership figures are based on in-depth personal interviews with over 60,000 Australians over the last 12 months including around 5,000 interviews each month. The full Roy Morgan March 2021 magazine readership figures are available to view here.

Readership of puzzle magazines by Gender & Generations: March 2020 vs. March 2021

https://www.roymorgan.com/~/media/files/morgan%20poll/2020s/2021/june/8732-c1.png?la=enSource: Roy Morgan Single Source (Australia), April 2019–March 2020, n= 48,935, April 2020–March 2021, n=66,050. Base: Australians 14+.

Millennials and Generation Z drive growth in puzzle magazine readership during pandemic

The strong growth in readership of puzzle magazines has been driven by the two youngest generations. In fact, readership of puzzle magazines has more than doubled over the past year for both Millennials and Generation Z – roughly those aged under 45 years of age.

There are now 575,000 Millennials reading puzzle magazines, up 291,000 (+102.2%) from a year ago, and 553,000 Gen Z reading puzzle magazines, up 285,000 (+106.0%) on a year ago.

The nation-wide lockdowns caused by the COVID-19 pandemic during 2020 has provided a definite boost to readership of puzzle magazines among younger Australians although this surge in readership for those aged under 45 has not been replicated for older generations.

There has also been growth among Gen X with 349,000 now reading Puzzle Magazines, up 53,000 (+17.8%) from a year ago, but older generations have not seen growth over the last year.

A year ago, Baby Boomers were the biggest readers of Puzzle Magazines, but this has fallen slightly from a year ago to 437,000, down 48,000 (-10.0%). There has been an even bigger decline amongst the older Pre-Boomers down 87,000 (-32.9%) to a readership of 178,000 in this generation.

Take 5 Mega Puzzler and Australian Women’s Weekly Puzzle Book are the top puzzle magazines

A look at the leading puzzle magazine titles shows that Take 5 Mega Puzzler is the leader with a readership of 430,000, an increase of 63,000 (+17.2%) on a year ago. In a clear second place is Australian Women’s Weekly Puzzle Book with a readership of 375,000 and with the biggest increase of 166,000 (+79.6%) on a year ago.

Two further widely read puzzle magazines are Woman’s Day Superpuzzler with a readership of 309,000, an increase of 104,000 (+50.6%) on a year ago and Take 5 Pocket Puzzler just behind on a readership of 302,000, up 30,000 (+11.0%).

Readership of leading puzzle magazines: March 2021 vs. March 2020

https://www.roymorgan.com/~/media/files/morgan%20poll/2020s/2021/june/8732-c2.png?la=enSource: Roy Morgan Single Source (Australia), April 2019–March 2020, n= 48,935, April 2020–March 2021, n=66,050. Base: Australians 14+.

Michele Levine, CEO, Roy Morgan, says the COVID-19 pandemic and the requirement to stay at home for extended periods due to lockdowns, as well as in the interests of personal safety, has seen readership of puzzle magazines soar – particularly among younger Australians:

“New Roy Morgan research shows puzzle magazines have been one of the big winners out of the COVID-19 pandemic with readership up nearly half-a-million (+30.8%) from a year ago to over 2 million in the year to March 2021.

“The big driver of the increase has been soaring readership of puzzle magazines amongst younger Australians with readership amongst Millennials and Generation Z both more than doubling from a year ago. Now 575,000 Millennials (aged 30-45) and 553,000 Generation Z (under 30) read print magazines in an average month.

“Younger demographics now comprise over 50% of the readership of puzzle magazines – up from around a third a year ago before the COVID-19 pandemic began. As the vaccinations continue to roll out around Australia over the next few months and life returns to a ‘COVID-normal’ the publishers of puzzle magazines will need to work extra hard to retain their new-found audience.

“Take 5 Mega Puzzler has been Australia’s most widely read puzzle magazine for some time now and has an impressive readership of 430,000 – up 63,000 (+17.2%) on a year ago. The biggest increases over the last year have been for Australian Women’s Weekly Puzzle Book, up 166,000 (+79.6%) to 375,000 and for Better Homes & Gardens Puzzle Book, up 125,000 (+88.4%) to 267,000.

“As well as these top-line readership figures Roy Morgan collects in-depth data on Australia’s puzzle magazine readers that provides publishers and advertisers with the ability to precisely target existing and potential customers.”

(Roy Morgan)

June 21 2021

Source: https://www.roymorgan.com/findings/8732-readership-of-puzzle-books-march-2020-march-2021-202106210431

 

695-696-43-33/Poll

ALP (50.5%) Leads L-NP (49.5%) On A Two-Party Preferred Basis – No Bounce For Pm From G7 Trip

ALP support is now 50.5% (down 0.5% points since early June) cf. L-NP on 49.5% (up 0.5% points) on a two-party preferred basis following Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s overseas trip to the G7 in the United Kingdom according to the latest Morgan Poll on Federal voting intention.

If a Federal Election were held now it would be too close to call with a higher than usual 7.5% of electors undecided about who they would vote for and with the real possibility Australia would have a hung Parliament for the first time in nearly a decade. Normally around 3-4% of electors can’t say who they would vote for.

Interviewing for the latest Morgan Poll was conducted over the weekends of June 12/13 & June 19/20, 2021 with a nationally representative cross-section of 2,782 Australian electors using  a combination of telephone and online interviews (multi-mode).


Primary Voting Intention for the L-NP is up to 41.5% while ALP support drops to 34.5%

Primary support for the L-NP increased 1.5% points to 41.5% compared to the ALP on 34.5% (down 1% point). Greens support was up 0.5% points to 12%.

Support for One Nation was up 0.5% points to 3.5% while support for Independents/Others has dropped by 1.5% points to 8.5%.


Voting Intention by State shows ALP ahead in Victoria but the L-NP leads in NSW, QLD & WA

Voting analysis by State shows the ALP’s national two-party preferred lead is built upon a strong two-party preferred result in Victoria with the ALP 55% (up 1.5% points since early June) cf. L-NP 45% (down 1.5% points) after the State emerged from a short two-week lockdown in mid-June.

This result represents a swing of 1.9% points to the ALP in Victoria since the 2019 Federal Election.

However, the L-NP leads in Australia’s other three largest States. In NSW the L-NP holds a narrow two-party preferred lead of L-NP 51% (up 1.5% points since early June) cf. ALP 49% (down 1.5% points). Despite the L-NP’s lead this result represents a swing of 0.8% points to the ALP since the 2019 Federal Election.

The L-NP has its strongest result In Queensland with a large lead of L-NP 56% (up 3% points since early June) cf. ALP 44% (down 3% points) on a two-party preferred basis. However, despite this comfortable lead this represents a swing of 2.4% points to the ALP since the 2019 Federal Election.

In Western Australia the L-NP holds a two-party preferred lead of L-NP 52% (up 1% point since early June) cf. ALP 48% (down 1% point) which represents a swing to ALP of 3.6% points since the 2019 Federal Election.

The ALP holds a two-party preferred lead in the smaller States with the ALP 52% (up 2.5% points since early June) cf. L-NP 48% (down 2.5% points) in South Australia, a swing of 1.3% points to the ALP since the 2019 Federal Election and in Tasmania the ALP 57% cf. L-NP 43% - a swing of 1% point to the ALP since the 2019 Federal Election.


Roy Morgan Government Confidence is virtually unchanged at 114 in mid-June

The Roy Morgan Government Confidence Rating is up 1pt from early June to 114. Now 49% (up 0.5% points since early June) of Australians say the country is ‘heading in the right direction’, while slightly more than a third, 35% (down 0.5% points) say the country is ‘heading in the wrong direction’.

The latest Government Confidence Ratings by State paint a contrasting picture and is above average in the three States with majority support for the L-NP, and below average for those supporting the ALP.

Government Confidence in Western Australia is far higher than anywhere else with a very high 127.5 in mid-June – more than 10pts above the national figure.

Government Confidence is also above average in Queensland at 118 and NSW at 115.5 – although the latest outbreak of COVID-19 may dent this figure in the next few weeks.

In contrast, Government Confidence is below average in the three States in which a majority of electors support the ALP including Tasmania and South Australia (both 108.5) and Victoria on only 105 nearly 10pts below the national average.

Michele Levine, CEO, Roy Morgan says Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s trip to the G7 Summit in Cornwall has provided only a small increase in support for the L-NP with the ALP 50.5% still leading the L-NP 49.5% on a two-party preferred basis:

“Today’s Morgan Poll on Federal voting intention shows the ALP (50.5%) maintaining its narrow two-party preferred lead over the L-NP (49.5%) despite the media attention paid to the Prime Minister’s trip to meet foreign leaders in the UK last week. Prime Minister Morrison is now quarantining for two weeks in The Lodge.

“There is certainly plenty for the Prime Minister to think about during his stint in quarantine with Barnaby Joyce returning as National Party Leader after more than three years on the backbench and an outbreak of COVID-19 in NSW set to test that State’s ability to handle the virus without resorting to city-wide or state-wide lockdowns.

“The questions about Australia’s vaccine roll-out are also continuing to mount with only around 3% of Australians now fully vaccinated against COVID-19 compared to around 50% in the UK and USA and even 7% in nearest neighbour New Zealand.

“The slow vaccine rollout is being used by States such as Victoria to justify the recent two-week lockdown and also domestic State border closures in response to any outbreaks. The most recent example of this is the targeted border closures of several States to certain suburbs of Sydney in response to the current outbreak concentrated in Sydney’s Eastern suburbs.

“A look at the voting figures on a State-by-State basis continues to show the ALP riding high in Victoria and now leading by 10% points on a two-party preferred basis: ALP 55% cf. L-NP 45%. The ALP currently holds 21 seats in Victoria compared to 15 for the L-NP.

“The ALP’s strength in Victoria underlies their national competitiveness with the L-NP leading on a two-party preferred basis in New South Wales, Queensland and Western Australia in which the L-NP holds 55 seats compared to 35 for the ALP.

“At present all signs point to another very close election either later this year or early next year although there are obvious risks for the Morrison Government with the vaccine roll-out progressing at a slower rate than many had expected.”

 

Electors were asked: “If an election for the House of Representatives were held today – which party will receive your first preference? and “Generally speaking, do you feel that things in Australia are heading in the right direction or would you say things are seriously heading in the wrong direction?”

This Roy Morgan Poll on Federal voting intention and Roy Morgan Government Confidence was conducted via telephone and online interviewing last weekend. Roy Morgan interviewed 2,782 Australian electors aged 18+ on the weekends of June 12/13 & June 19/20, 2021. A higher than usual 7.5% of electors (up 2% points from early June) can’t say who they support.

Australian Federal Voting Intention: Two-Party Preferred (2019-2021)

Federal Voting Intention - Two-Party Preferred

Source: Roy Morgan Single Source. Average interviews per fortnight n=2,000. May 2019–Jun 2021. Base: Australian electors 18+.

(Roy Morgan)

June 23 2021

Source: https://www.roymorgan.com/findings/8736-federal-voting-intention-june-2021-202106230548

 

695-696-43-34/Poll

In The 12 Months To March 2021 A Fast-Rising 38.8% Of Australians Agree That ‘Credit Enables Me To Buy The Things I Want’ – An Increase Of 12.4% Points From A Year Ago Pre-Covid-19

New research from Roy Morgan shows the COVID-19 pandemic has had a big impact on key financial and shopping attitudes with big increases in those willing to use credit to buy the things they want, who like being well insured, who go out of their way for a bargain and more.

In the 12 months to March 2021 a fast-rising 38.8% of Australians agree that ‘Credit enables me to buy the things I want’ – an increase of 12.4% points from a year ago pre-COVID-19. This is the largest increase for any of the financial attitudes covered here and suggests the long-term decline in usage of credit is being reversed as alternative payment systems such as Zip and Afterpay enter the market.

The COVID-19 pandemic has also had a large impact on how Australians conduct their banking and over three-fifths (60.1%) now agree ‘It would be ideal if I could conduct all my banking without ever having to go to a Branch’ – an increase of 9.8% points from a year ago pre-COVID-19.

The stay-at-home orders and potential risk of catching COVID-19 while out and about in the community has clearly diminished the attraction of waiting in long queues at the local branch when the ease of use of websites and apps to conduct banking transactions is easier than ever before.

There is also good news for insurers with over three-quarters of Australians, 75.5%, now agreeing that ‘I like to be well insured’ – an increase of 6.2% points from a year ago pre-COVID-19.

There are other attitudes on which COVID-19 has had a lesser impact.

Now 67.2% (up 4.3% points from a year ago) of Australians say that ‘Recently I’ve cut down my spending’, and slightly fewer, 57.6% (down 2.1% points) agree that ‘I feel financially stable at the moment’ – both movements in a negative direction but not as great as one would have feared a year ago.

The financial impact of COVID-19 hasn’t shaken people’s self-belief about their own financial management with a virtually unchanged 73.5% of Australians saying ‘I feel confident about managing my finances’.

The data comes from Roy Morgan Single Source, the nation’s largest and longest-running program of research into consumer behaviour and attitudes, continuously conducted year-round. 

Key financial attitudes: Pre COVID-19 (March 2020) vs. During COVID-19 (March 2021)

https://www.roymorgan.com/~/media/files/morgan%20poll/2020s/2021/june/8733-c1.png?la=enSource: Roy Morgan Single Source, April 2019 – March 2020, n=46,453; April 2020 – March 2021, n=42,159. Base: Australians 18+.

Compared to pre-COVID, Australians are more likely to search for a bargain and try out new brands.

COVID-19 has clearly had an impact on Australians’ attitudes towards how they shop, and none bigger than increasing the bargain-hunting instincts of many. Now a clear majority of 56% of Australians say ‘I’ll go out of my way in search of a bargain’ – an increase of 11.9% points from a year ago pre-COVID-19.

From a low base there are now 18.2% who claim they were ‘born to shop’, an increase of 7.5% points on a year ago pre-COVID-19. The strong retail sales figures over the last year since the introduction of the $89 billion JobKeeper wage subsidy, the increased JobSeeker rate and the $36 billion superannuation withdrawal program have powered ABS retail sales figures to record highs since May 2019.

The latest ABS Retail Sales figures for April 2021 showed retail sales at a record high of over $31 billion – or more than $1 billion per day.

Australians are also increasingly looking for new brands with 56.6%, up 5.7% points, saying ‘I am always ready to try new and different products’ although also being more cost-conscious than prior to the pandemic with nearly half, 44.7% (up 5.9% points) saying ‘I buy more store’s own products than well-known brands’.

Key shopping attitudes: Pre COVID-19 (March 2020) vs. During COVID-19 (March 2021)

https://www.roymorgan.com/~/media/files/morgan%20poll/2020s/2021/june/8733-c2.png?la=enSource: Roy Morgan Single Source, April 2019 – March 2020, n=46,453; April 2020 – March 2021, n=42,159. Base: Australians 18+.

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a huge impact on our lives over the last year-and-a-half and some of the changes to the way we think and act are set to prove enduring – including the way we deal with financial decisions and how we shop says Roy Morgan CEO, Michele Levine:

“The COVID-19 pandemic provided a huge shock to the Australian economy and way of life in early 2020 and these effects continue to linger on with attitudes to many financial questions and shopping behaviours still changing.

“Now over three-quarters of Australians (75.5%) said they ‘like to be well insured’ – up significantly by 6.2% points compared to pre-pandemic. The way Australians conduct their banking has also been heavily impacted with 60.1% saying ‘It would be ideal if I could conduct all my banking without ever having to go to a branch’ – up nearly 10% points in only a year.

“The desire to conduct all financial affairs without heading into a branch has been a long-developing trend which COVID-19 has accelerated as banking by website and app becomes increasingly the norm. 

“However, perhaps the most interesting trend over the past year has been the sharp increase in those Australians saying that ‘Credit enables me to buy the things that I want’ – now at 38.8% (up a large 12.4% points on pre-pandemic).

“This is the largest increase for any financial attitude and suggests that new forms of ‘credit’ such as the ‘buy-now-pay-later’ services Zip and Afterpay are now driving a change in these attitudes alongside the financial challenges driven by the pandemic. The latest Roy Morgan Digital Payments Report shows 72.4% of Australians are aware of ‘buy-now-pay-later’ services – almost double the figure of 36.9% in less than three years ago in late 2018.

“The increasing uptake of new digital payment services that defer immediate payment plays into the changing attitudes of shoppers. Now over half of Australians (56%) say ‘I will go out of my way in search of a bargain’ – an increase of 11.9% points on pre-pandemic.

“Shoppers are also on the lookout for bargains generally with 56.6% (up 5.7% points) saying ‘I am always ready to try new and different products’ and 44.7% (up 5.9% points) saying ‘I buy more store’s own products than well-known brands’.

“Taken all together the changing attitudes of Australians is being driven not only by the forced restrictions of the COVID-19 pandemic with lockdowns and stay-at-home orders, but also the increasing availability of new technology that enables frictionless banking and shopping without having to even leave one’s house.

“COVID-19 has accelerated these trends, which were already evident pre-pandemic, and they present both great opportunities to find new channels to reach potential customers, as well as challenges to old ways of doing business.”

(Roy Morgan)

June 25 2021

Source: https://www.roymorgan.com/findings/8733-shopping-attitudes-march-2021-202106250709

 

695-696-43-35/Poll

60% Of Australians Believe That Giving Aid To Developing Nations Is Good For Australia, Compared With 21% Who Believe That It Makes No Difference

Data collected by YouGov, the international data and polling company, shows that Australians are inclined to think that sending aid to developing nations is good for their country. 60% of Australians believe that giving aid to developing nations is ‘good for Australia’, compared with 21% who believe that it ‘makes no difference’, and just 12% that hold the opposite opinion that such aid is ‘bad for Australia’. In turn, only half the British feel this way, and a quarter thinks it makes no difference.

Responses in Australia vary along gender and generational lines. Women are more likely than men to see aid as a good thing for Australia (63% compared to 58%), whereas men are more likely than women to think that sending aid overseas makes no difference for the country (25% compared to 18%).

Seven-in-ten of Generation Z (71%) think giving aid is beneficial for Australia, whereas just over half of Baby Boomers (55%) hold the same opinion. In contrast, ambivalence towards the effect of aid for Australia is prevalent amongst the older demographic, with Baby Boomers (30%) and the Silent generation (26%) thinking that giving aid does makes any difference for the nation. This reflects a generational divide in how the role and impact of aid is being perceived in Australia.

https://docs.cdn.yougov.com/x2ha3l6qpe/1SMgu-generational-attitudes-towards-giving-foreign-aid.png

(YouGov Australia)

June 23, 2021

Source: https://au.yougov.com/news/2021/06/23/aussies-are-more-likely-brits-think-giving-aid-dev/

MULTICOUNTRY STUDIES

695-696-43-36/Poll

Among 17 Advanced Economies A Median Of 22% Say They Have Confidence In Putin To Do The Right Thing In World Affairs, Compared With A Median Of 74% Who Say They Have No Such Confidence

Russian President Vladimir Putin’s global image has been consistently low for years in many countries, and a Pew Research Center survey conducted this spring in 17 advanced economies shows that negative views of him are at or near historic highs in most places. Today, a median of 22% say they have confidence in Putin to do the right thing in world affairs, compared with a median of 74% who say they have no such confidence.

Singapore (55%), Greece (55%), Italy (36%) and Taiwan (34%) stand out as the only places surveyed where roughly a third or more say they have confidence in the Russian president. Confidence is lowest in Sweden (14%) and the United States (16%). In both of these countries, as well as in the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, France, New Zealand and Belgium, at least 45% or more say they have no confidence at all in him.

While confidence in Putin has been quite low in many countries for much of the last decade –particularly following the annexation of Crimea in 2014 – it has dropped even further in the past year in Australia (down 7 percentage points).

Confidence in Putin remains near record lows in many places

Younger people tend to be more confident in Putin than older counterparts

Across many places surveyed, younger people have more confidence in Putin than their older counterparts. The largest difference by far is in Japan (44 percentage points between the youngest and oldest respondents) though there are differences of at least 20 points in the UK, Spain, Australia, France and New Zealand. Though the difference is smaller in the U.S., Americans under 30 are also more likely to have confidence in Putin, with roughly a fifth of 18- to 29-year-olds saying so, compared with only 9% of those 65 and older.

These age-related patterns have often been prevalent in views of Putin. And when it comes to opinion about Russia more generally, younger adults also tend to have more favorable views of the country than older people.

In some countries, men are more confident in Putin than women. For example, in Germany, 36% of men say they have confidence in Putin to do the right thing in world affairs, while just 19% of women agree. Double-digit differences are also present in France, Italy and Belgium, while gender differences are smaller in Canada, Spain and New Zealand. Those with less education also have more confidence in Putin than those with more education in about half the countries surveyed. In Italy, for example, roughly a quarter of those with a postsecondary degree or higher have confidence in Putin, while nearly four-in-ten of those with no postsecondary degree have confidence in him. Similar differences persist across eight other countries polled.

Populist party supporters in Europe more likely to have confidence in Putin than nonsupporters

In Europe, supporters of populist parties, both right- and left-wing, are more likely to have confidence in Putin than those who don’t support such parties. For example, in Italy, those with a favorable view of right-wing Lega are more than twice as likely to have confidence in Putin as those with an unfavorable view (62% vs. 26%, respectively). The same goes for supporters of Forza Italia – roughly half have confidence in Putin to do the right thing, while roughly a quarter of nonsupporters say the same.

In the U.S., Republicans and Republican-leaning independents tend to have more confidence in Putin than Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents (20% vs. 12%, respectively). Still, overwhelming majorities in both parties lack confidence in Putin.

More broadly, in some countries people who identify themselves as ideologically right-leaning are more likely than those on the left to have confidence in Putin. The largest such difference is, again, in Italy, where a majority (56%) of those on the right say they have confidence in Putin while just 19% on the left agree. In Sweden, Greece, France, Canada, Germany, Australia, the UK and the U.S., there are also double-digit differences between the right and left.

When it comes to comparisons with other global leaders, confidence in Putin is substantially below that in German Chancellor Angela Merkel, U.S. President Joe Biden and French President Emmanuel Macron. Yet his ratings are quite comparable – and slightly better in some of the European countries surveyed – to Chinese President Xi Jinping’s.

Confidence in Putin is comparable to confidence in Xi in most places surveyed – but far lower than confidence in Macron, Merkel or Biden

Confidence in Xi and confidence in Putin are closely related: Places with higher levels of confidence in one tend to also have higher levels of confidence in the other. The opposite is true of Merkel – places with higher levels of confidence in Merkel tend to have less confidence in Putin.

(PEW)

JUNE 14, 2021

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/06/14/few-across-17-advanced-economies-have-confidence-in-putin/

 

695-696-43-37/Poll

People In The Nordics Are Mostly Into City Breaks i.e. Short Holidays Spent In A City, With An Average Of 42 % People Choosing This Type Of Holiday (Ranging From 35 % Of Swedes To 46 % Of Finns)

The global pandemic heavily influenced last summer’s holiday season in the Nordics, but as vaccinations are rolling and restrictions are gradually easing, more and more start planning and dare to book a holiday abroad.

Which holiday types do the people in the Nordics generally prefer?

In May, we measured the holiday types people in Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Finland typically take.

Holiday Type

Overall, people in the Nordics are mostly into city breaks i.e. short holidays spent in a city, with an average of 42 % people choosing this type of holiday (ranging from 35 % of Swedes to 46 % of Finns). Next up are holidays that combine relaxing and sightseeing/activity, with an average of 38 % – however, this applies to only 28 % of the Swedish population.

People in the Nordics generally like to visit friends and family in the holidays (37 %). Especially Swedes (42 %) and Norwegians (41 %) practice this kind of vacation activity, while it is slightly less popular in Denmark (29 %).

Holidays that involve culture and history are furthermore popular across the Nordic countries (23 %).

Swedes prefer beach holidays, while many Finns choose a cruise

Looking at the countries separately, there are several national differences.

Focusing on Sweden, the most popular holiday activity is simply relaxing at the beach. Almost half of the Swedes (46 %) choose this type of holiday, while only a third of Finns (33 %) and Danes (32 %) state the same.

The Finns have another favorite in their top 5. A third of the population (32 %) state that they like to go on a cruise for the holidays – this applies to averagely 10 % in the other countries, and for Denmark, the number is just 5 %.

Danes are also less into holidays at a theme park (5 %), as opposed to Norway and Sweden where one out of ten (11 % and 10 %) state that they like this kind of holiday.

(YouGov Denmark)
June 15, 2021

Source: https://yougov.dk/news/2021/06/15/most-popular-holiday-types-nordics/

 

695-696-43-38/Poll

3 In 4 Britons Believe In The Right To Seek Refuge, But 2 In 5 Want To Shut Borders Completely At This Time

A global survey by Ipsos shows almost three-quarters of Britons (73%) agree with the principle that people should be able to take refuge in other countries, including Britain, to escape from war or persecution. Only 17% of Britons disagree with this, which is lower than the average across the 28 countries (23%). However, although the proportion of people disagreeing with the right to seek refuge has remained largely the same since 2020 (15%), the proportion of Britons agreeing has decreased by 5 percentage points (78%).

The survey, conducted online among adults aged under 74 across 28 countries, finds that despite wide support for the right to take refuge, opinion remains split as to whether Britain must close its borders at the current time. Around 2 in 5 Britons (42%) agree we must close our borders to refugees entirely and that we cannot accept any refugees at this time (similar to last year), while around half disagree (49%).  Britons are slightly less in favour of closing borders to refugees than elsewhere. On average, across the 28 countries surveyed, half (50%) agree to closing borders, while 43% disagree – largely unchanged since 2020. 

More than half of Britons are sceptical about those trying to get into the country as refugees. Fifty-six per cent say most foreigners trying to come into Britain really aren’t refugees and that instead they just want to come here for economic reasons or to take advantage of our welfare services. This is an increase of 5 percentage points since 2020 (51%). A third (34%) disagree with this – a similar picture to last year (34%).  Britons are less sceptical compared with the global country average, where, 62% agree with this and 3 in 10 (30%) disagree. 

Opinion is split as to whether refugees successfully integrate into their new society. Almost half of Britons (48%) agree most refugees will successfully integrate, while 41% disagree. This picture remains largely unchanged since 2020 (when 51% agreed and 39% disagreed) and is similar to the average across the 28 countries for 2021 (47%).

Four in ten Britons (39%) say we should be less open to accepting refugees than before the COVID-19 outbreak. This is broadly in line with the global country average, where 42% want their countries to become less open to accepting refugees. However,1 in 5 Britons (19%) say we should be more open, which is higher than the global country average (14%) and an increase of 4 percentage points since 2020.  Around a third of Britons (32%) say we should be as open as we were before the outbreak – largely unchanged since 2020 (33%). 

Similarly, around 1 in 5 Britons (18%) say we should increase the level of spending on support for refugees around the world due to the due to the outbreak of COVID-19 – this is slightly higher than the global country average (14%) and an increase of 6 percentage points since 2020. However, four in ten (39%) want Britain to decrease the amount it spends on support for refugees around the world and around a third (32%) want to keep the same level of spending as before the pandemic – largely unchanged since last year. 

You can read more about the global results, and the results of other countries on our global website or in the charts linked at the bottom of the page.

Ben Page, CEO of Ipsos MORI, said:

These new findings suggest a hardening of attitudes towards refugees entering the UK.  Although a majority believe that people should be able to seek refuge in another country in principle, there is also growing cynicism about whether those entering the country are genuinely seeking refuge, with a growing number of Britons saying that they believe the majority of arrivals to be economic migrants.

(Ipsos MORI)

16 June 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/ipsos-mori/en-uk/3-4-britons-believe-right-seek-refuge-2-5-want-shut-borders-completely-time

 

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Canadians Agree (72%) People Should Be Able To Seek Refuge From War And Persecution, But Few (10%) Like The Idea Of Letting In More Refugees Post-Pandemic

Toronto, ON June 21, 2021 — A new global Ipsos study, carried out to mark World Refugee Day 2021, paints a mixed picture of attitudes towards refugees. Although Canadians agree (72%) with the idea that persons should be able to seek refuge from war and persecution, when it comes to putting principle into practice very few (10%) are willing to open up their borders to more refugees. Coupled with widespread skepticism (52%) over whether those seeking refuge are genuine, Ipsos data paints a picture that shows Canadians may not be as welcoming as our global reputation suggests.

However, Canada is certainly not an anomaly: across 28 countries surveyed, no country showed a majority in favour of increasing the number of refugees allowed into their country following the Coronavirus/COVID-19 outbreak, and there is little support for greater government spending on refugees around the world.

Despite half saying that refugees in Canada integrate well, four in ten declare we must close our borders entirely

Recent polling shows Canadians are divided in their attitudes towards refugees: half (54%) agree that most refugees that come to Canada will successfully integrate into their new society, while 37% disagree. On this particular metric, the attitudes of Canadians mirror those of the broader international community: the global average shows that 47% agree that refugees will integrate successfully into their new societies, while 44% disagree. The attitudes of Canadians fall near the centre: they are not as optimistic about refugee integration as respondents in Saudi Arabia (76%), India (68%), or Argentina (60%), but neither are they as pessimistic as residents of South Korea (29%), France (25%), or Japan (23%).

Canadians are split on isolationist issues: when provided with the statement “we must close our borders to refugees entirely – we can’t accept any at this time,” 50% disagree, but 42% agree. In short, four in ten believe Canada should close its border to all refugees. While this may seem severe, of the 28 countries polled, Canadians fall within the ten least restrictive-– those in Poland (34%), Japan (38%), the United States (41%) are least supportive of a closed border policy while those in Malaysia (82%), Turkey (75%), and India (69%) show stronger support for border closures.

Perhaps less surprising, in light of the global recession resulting from the pandemic, is the results showing that few Canadians want to open up their wallets and pay more to support refugees. When asked, “do you think the government in Canada should increase or decrease the amount it spends on support for refugees around the world due to coronavirus/COVID-19 or do you think it should keep spending the same as before the outbreak?” a majority agree that funding should remain the same (36%) or be decreased (42%), with only 8% electing to increase spending.

Canadians on par with global average regarding principle of refugeehood, but more fiscally conservative towards refugees than most other nations

While these figures may seem a departure for a nation that prides itself on being welcoming to refugees, a broader lens shows that Canadians are not alone in their split attitudes. The views of Canadians towards the principle of refuge  (72% agree) are in line with the global average (70% globally agree with principle of refuge) and highly comparable to other nations of similar wealth and influence, including Great Britain (73% agree with principle of refuge), or the United States (71% agree with principle of refuge).

Furthermore, the data show the proportion of Canadians who feel we should be less open to refugees than before the pandemic (42%) is right on track with the global average (42%).

However, Canadians are more fiscally conscious than many other nations: only 8% believe the Canadian government should increase spending to support refugees around the world due to COVID-19, below the 14% global average. On this particular metric, Canadians are some of the most fiscally cautious, second only to the authoritarian nations of Russia (8% increase spending) and Turkey (8% increase spending) in their reluctance to increase spending for refugee supports.

Considering the dichotomy of broad support for the principle of seeking refuge despite widespread skepticism about whether refugees are genuine, the data suggests that there are no clear-cut attitudes towards refugees in Canada, or the international community. The data does indicate that there is a long way to go in both Canada, and in many nations, to improve attitudes towards refugees in practice rather than theory.

(Ipsos Canada)

22 June 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-ca/news-polls/canadians-agree-people-should-be-able-to-seek-refuge-from-war-and-persecution

 

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Three In Five Urban Indians Would Watch More Of Women’s Sport If It Was More Accessible On TV YouGov

YouGov’s latest report reveals three in five (59%) urban Indians feel they would watch more of women’s sport if it were shown more on the television.

“Women in Sport Report 2021” explores how women’s sport is perceived around the globe – with the aim of giving marketers an inside track on identifying where the greatest value lies.  

Globally, a third of people (33%) say they would watch more women’s sport if it was more accessible on TV.  Agreement with this statement is the highest in India, followed by Mexico and UAE.

Around the globe, the popularity of women’s sports is much lower than men’s sports across all the sporting categories. The difference is most pronounced in the category of professional sport: respondents are almost twice as likely to watch or follow men’s sport than women’s sport (40% vs 19%).

The most popular reason people give around the world for not following women’s sports is the lack of media coverage (40%). Other supply-side factors acting as barriers to engagement include lack of knowledge about women’s teams or athletes (35%), lack of marketing (30%) and limited accessibility of women’s sport on TV (27%). The speed, quality and physicality of women’s sport is much less likely to be a reason for not engaging. 

When it comes to motivation to watch women’s sport, two in five respondents (42%) think watching and supporting big sporting events is the biggest reason for people to get interested in women’s sport. Around a third of people (35%) say playing sport as a child is likely to spur an interest and, for around the same proportion having a child who played a sport (30%) is seen as a reason to engage.

The data shows women’s soccer has the highest following of any women’s sport (at 26%) globally, followed by tennis, basketball and volleyball. This varies across countries. In India, the popularity of cricket far exceeds the global popularity of soccer, with nearly three in ten following women’s cricket (58%).

When it comes to interest in women’s sporting leagues, FIFA Women’s World Cup is the most popular among public, followed by Women’s Tennis Association and Women’s National Basketball Association.

Popularity of these events is one of the highest in India, especially for Women’s Tennis Association and FIFA Women’s World Cup.

Talking about the future of women’s sport, a large majority of urban Indian respondents (84%) say there has been an enhancement in the quality of women’s games in the last five years. Around three- quarters perceive there has been progress in areas like live coverage of women’s sport, availability of news on women’s games and sponsorship for them.

The data gives a sense of optimism for women’s sport as nearly three-quarters of public in India (73%) would like to see more exposure for it. This could bear potential rewards for brands considering support for sport. Urban Indians tell us that a brand’s association with women’s professional sport is less likely to make them think more positively about the brand than an association with men’s pro sport (53% men vs 43% women). Having said that, women are more likely to look on a brand’s support favourably than men (37% men vs 43% women).

Speaking about this, Joseph Eapen of YouGov, said, “Across the globe, there are big differences in the way people perceive and consume women’s sports. Although currently it is less popular than men’ sports, there is potential for growth of women’s sport in the future. While this presents a commercial opportunity, the challenge for sports marketers is to find a way to build interest in athletes and teams and create narratives to make women’s sport more appealing to its audiences.”

(YouGov India)
June 24, 2021

Source: https://in.yougov.com/en-hi/news/2021/06/24/three-five-urban-indians-would-watch-more-womens-s/

 

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In Five Of Seven MENA States At Least 40 Percent Have A Favorable View Of France Overall

France has a long history of engagement with MENA, including as a colonial power and through numerous military interventions. More recently, Emmanuel Macron has sought to increase France’s influence across MENA. In 2020, he personally interceded to try to find a solution to the crisis in Lebanon and has worked to deepen engagement with other countries in the region.  Nevertheless, his personal engagement appears to have yielded limited results. Although views of France are moderately positive across the countries surveyed in Arab Barometer’s sixth wave – in five of seven at least 40 percent have a favorable view of France overall – views of Macron himself lag significantly. In no country surveyed do 40 percent of citizens have a positive view of his policies. Likely, his controversial statements about Islam and limited success in resolving the crisis in Lebanon have contributed to his lower overall ratings compared with the country he leads.

(Arabbarometer)

June 24, 2021

Source: https://www.arabbarometer.org/2021/06/mena-pulse-on-france-macron/

 

695-696-43-42/Poll

In 17 Countries Only 8% Of Respondents (Gamers And Non-Gamers) Would Describe Video Games As Inclusive

A global study conducted in 17 countries shows that only 8% of respondents (gamers and non-gamers) would describe video games as “inclusive”. We observe that  the French (22%) and the Danes (14%)  are the most likely to share this opinion.

At the same time, nearly half (49%) of global consumers rate video games as fun - a figure that is on the rise by men (53%). While 35% find video games to be relaxing , 40% think they are addictive (43% of women vs. 37% of men).

In addition, we note that nearly one in five consumers consider that gaming  creates social links (17%). During the COVID-19 crisis, video games have indeed taken an important place in the lives of many people. Several games have grown in popularity, including the online multiplayer deduction game Among Us , the Jackbox quizzes and the social simulation game Animal Crossing: New Horizon .

Finally, we observe that only 15% of respondents consider video games to be violent , which suggests that the prejudices that have hung over this industry for decades are fading.

Note: the French are the most likely to qualify video games as violent, at 25%, at the same level as Mexicans.

(YouGov France)

June 24, 2021

Source: https://fr.yougov.com/news/2021/06/24/comment-les-jeux-video-sont-ils-percus-en-2021/

 

695-696-43-43/Poll

In Many Markets Such As Spain, Mexico And China, The Ratio Of People Who Prefer Hybrids To Electrics Is Around 2:1

As governments across the globe introduce legislation to encourage consumers to buy battery-powered vehicles – and crucially, to eventually stop the sale of new petrol/diesel cars – the auto industry is looking at an increasingly electric future. What’s more, there’s evidence that consumers are embracing the idea: in Britain, for example, people think electric cars beat petrol cars in several key areas, with the notable exception of convenience. The most commonly-selected barrier was cost (selected by 26% of drivers).

Global YouGov data suggests that, even if you remove the extra costs of buying an electric car from the equation, they still aren’t consumers’ first choice. We asked people in 17 different markets if they would prefer an electric, hybrid, or petrol/diesel car if they were buying a new vehicle; the models were the same; and they were all the same price. In most countries and territories, hybrid vehicles were the first choice (except for Germany, where 40% opted for petrol/diesel cars, with hybrids the second choice).

Hong Kong is the only market where electric cars come close to matching hybrids in terms of overall preference: three in ten (30%) say they would opt for an electric car, all things being equal, while nearly a third (32%) say they would go for a hybrid. In many markets such as Spain (51% vs. 20%), Mexico (50% vs. 27%) and China (45% vs. 19%), the ratio of people who prefer hybrids to electrics is around 2:1.

This suggests that, while cost may be the top barrier overall, the day-to-day convenience of owning an electric car remains a major sticking point. While there are nine markets in our study where people are at least as likely to go for the electric car as they are to choose the petrol or diesel vehicle, there are still several markets where cars powered by fossil fuels win out. Add that to the fact that majority of consumers globally would opt for the hybrids, and both auto manufacturers and policy-makers may need to do more to increase the attractiveness of the fully electric car.

(YouGov UK)

June 24, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/transport/articles-reports/2021/06/24/all-costs-being-equal-consumers-still-prefer-hybri

 

695-696-43-44/Poll