BUSINESS & POLITICS IN THE WORLD

 

GLOBAL OPINION REPORT NO. 703-704

 

 

Week: August 09 –August 22, 2021

 

Presentation: August 27, 2021

 

 

Contents

 

703-704-43-42/Commentary: British Public Equally Divided Over Withdrawal Of Military From Afghanistan. 3

SUMMARY OF POLLS. 5

ASIA   16

Two-Thirds Of Urban Indians (67%) Think P.V.Sindhu Has Made The Country Proud At An International Sports Event 16

Between June 1 And 8, 56% Respondents Said The Government Has Been Handling The Rollout Of Vaccines Very Or Somewhat Well 20

7 Out Of 10 Parents Now Want Face-To-Face Education For Their Children. 27

MENA   30

Most UAE Residents 74% Think That The Tokyo Olympics' Theme Will Help Promote D&I Globally Among The People  30

AFRICA.. 32

More Than Three-Fourths (78%) Of Sudanese “Agree” Or “Strongly Agree” That The Lockdown Was Necessary To Limit The Spread Of Covid-19. 33

Eight In 10 Adult Zimbabweans (80%) Say They Have Heard About Social Media. 36

The Proportion Of Gambians Who Describe Their Personal Living Conditions As “Fairly Good” Or “Very Good” Has Decreased Drastically, From 66% In 2018 To 35%... 40

Most Zambians (84%) Prefer Democracy To Any Other Form Of Government 45

The Proportion Of Zambians Who Say That “Most” Or “All” Officials In The Presidency Are Corrupt Has Increased Steadily From 27% In 2014 To 40% In 2020. 48

WEST EUROPE.. 51

Six In Ten Britons (60%) Support The Introduction Of Vaccine Passports Sooner Rather Than Later 51

Two In Five Britons Think Mortgage Applications Are Unfair 53

Britons Are Most Likely To Support Banning Imports Of Goods Linked To Deforestation (60%) 55

Half (53%) Of Tory Voters Say They Immigration Is A Top Issue Facing The Country. 57

Two In Three Support Increasing National Insurance For Social Care Reform Or To Reduce NHS Backlog. 58

The Public Are Divided On Whether The Government Should End Universal Credit Top Up, With Two In Five Britons (38%) Supporting The Move, While An Equal Share (39%) Oppose It 60

The Public Are Strongly Agreed (87%) In Saying It Has Done A Good Job In Ensuring The Public Are Vaccinated  61

Almost Half Of Brits 45% With Opinion On The Matter Say Manchester City Are Favourites To Win League. 64

44% Of Britons Supported The Withdrawal Of Western Troops From Afghanistan. 65

Two Thirds (68%) Support Maintaining The Rule Stating That The Value Of The State Pension Must Rise Each Year, Compared To Just 11% Who Want To Scrap It 68

British Public Equally Divided Over Withdrawal Of Military From Afghanistan. 74

Gun ownership: three quarters of Britons want stricter laws. 77

A Total Of Three Quarters Of The Respondents See A Chance For Another Covid-19 Wave In Hungary. 78

NORTH AMERICA.. 81

Among All U.S. Adults, 63% Favor Making Tuition At Public Colleges Free. 81

International Travel Is Something A 71% Majority Of U.S. Adults Have Done At Some Point In Their Lives. 83

Among U.S. Adults Overall, 53% Say Increased Attention To That History Is A Good Thing For Society. 87

Nearly Half 49% Of U.S. Adults Have Tried Marijuana. 104

Roughly Half Of U S Adults (48%) Now Say The Government Should Take Steps To Restrict False Information. 106

Roughly Seven-In-Ten Rural Americans (72%) Say They Have A Broadband Internet Connection At Home. 109

Out Of The Starting Blocks - More Of The Same: Liberals 36%, Conservatives 31%, NDP 20%, Bloc 6%, Green 5%    111

Strong Majority Of Canadians (Almost 80%) Support Vaccination Mandates; Open To Measures Including Vaccine Passports  113

Justin Trudeau Still Best to Lead Country, Say Canadians (39%), Ahead of O’Toole (25%) and Singh (23%) 117

AUSTRALIA.. 121

22% Of Esports Fans (~ 1.2 Million People) Say They Will Buy A Car Within The Next 12 Months. 121

Australians Are Set To Spend Around $800 Million On Father’s Day Presents This Year With Alcohol And Food Topping The Gifts For Dad. 127

NAB Likely To Leapfrog ANZ With 4.5 Million Customers Following Agreement To Purchase Citigroup’s Australian Business. 133

MULTICOUNTRY STUDIES. 135

Pfizer Vaccine Received A Net Positive Safety Score In Every Country Surveyed. 135

Globally A Majority Of People Perceive A Strong Social Division, But This Is Particularly Common In South Africa (74%), Hungary (72%) And Brazil (72%) 138

More Than Four Million People Are Known To Have Died Globally From Coronavirus During The Pandemic. 140

An Average Of 58% Globally Say They Want To Do Sports But There Is No Time To Do It (37%) 142

Only Seven Percent Of The Global Public In 29 Countries Who Participated In The Survey Believe That Their Country's Economies Are Recovering. 142

In Surveys Conducted In 2020-1, More Than Four-In-Ten Say That U S Foreign Assistance Helps Advance Women’s Rights And Strengthens Civil Society In Their Country. 143

 


 

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

 

This weekly report consists of forty one surveys. The report includes six multi-country studies from different states across the globe.

 

703-704-43-42/Commentary: British Public Equally Divided Over Withdrawal Of Military From Afghanistan

New polling shows that Britons are split on the British military withdrawing from  Afghanistan, with 39% of people saying it was the right thing to do and 40% saying it was the wrong decision.  The British public are more critical of the US withdrawing its troops, with 47% of people saying it was the wrong thing to do, however it is still not the majority of people. Nearer a third (31%) think the US made the right decision pulling their troops out of Afghanistan.

Britons are split on the British military withdrawing from Afghanistan, with 39% of people saying it was the right thing to do and 40% saying it was the wrong decision.

When it comes to future interventions, if the Taliban regime commits widespread human rights abuses or allows extremist groups to operate in Afghanistan, the most popular options are diplomatic/economic interventions (34%) and humanitarian interventions (32%), with the a third  agreeing with each  of these options.  One in five (22%) would support military interventions and a similar proportion (19%) think Britain shouldn’t intervene at all.   There are, however, significant differences between Conservative and Labour voters, with Conservative more likely to favour military intervention (29% vs. 21% of Labour voters) whereas Labour voters would support an humanitarian intervention (25% vs. 42%).

When It comes to future interventions by Britain, if the Taliban regime commits widespread human rights abuses or allows extremist groups to operate in Afghanistan, the most popular options are diplomatic/economic interventions (34%) and humanitarian interventions (32%), with the a third  agreeing with each  of these options.

The majority of people (52%) don’t think the British military campaign was effective in bringing stability to Afghanistan. Just one in three (34%) think it has been effective, which is down from 42% in 2015.

The majority of people (52%) don’t think the British military campaign was effective in bringing stability to Afghanistan. Just one in three (34%) think it has been effective, which is down from 42% in 2015.

The public also remain split on whether the military campaign was successful in preventing Afghanistan from being used as a base for terrorists to attack British interests. Two in five (42%) think it was effective, whilst another two-fifths (41%) say it wasn’t – this compares to 41% (effective) and 49% (ineffective) in 2015.

The public also remain split on whether the military campaign was successful in preventing Afghanistan from being used as a base for terrorists to attack British interests. Two in five (42%) think it was effective, whilst another two-fifths (41%) say it wasn’t – this compares to 41% (effective) and 49% (ineffective) in 2015.

Ben Page, CEO of Ipsos MORI, said:

The British public is divided over whether or not Britain was right to withdraw forces from Afghanistan, with 39% saying it was the right thing to do and 40% opposed. More feel America was wrong to withdraw, but even here not a majority (47%).   In terms of what happens next only 19% say we should do nothing; most want humanitarian measures and sanctions against the regime and humanitarian aid.

(Ipsos MORI)

19 August 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/ipsos-mori/en-uk/britons-are-split-over-afghanistan-military-withdrawal

 

SUMMARY OF POLLS

ASIA

(India)

Two-Thirds Of Urban Indians (67%) Think P.V.Sindhu Has Made The Country Proud At An International Sports Event

The recently concluded Tokyo Olympics 2020 saw India’s best rankings in over four decades and gave it its second gold medal. On the occasion of India’s 74th Independence Day, YouGov asked respondents which sportsperson according to them has made India proud at an international level. Data from the survey conducted between 3 and 6 August among 1135 respondents reveals two-thirds of urban Indians (67%) think P.V.Sindhu has made the country proud at an international sports event.

(YouGov India)

August 12, 2021

 

Between June 1 And 8, 56% Respondents Said The Government Has Been Handling The Rollout Of Vaccines Very Or Somewhat Well

Urban Indian public’s perception of the Central Government handling the Coronavirus crisis has improved since June. During the wave run between June 1 and 8, 56% respondents said the government has been handling the rollout of vaccines very or somewhat well. With the rapid progression of the vaccination drive and its extension to 18+ adults, this number has increased steadily, to 64% at the end of July (between 16-23 July). Similarly, the percent of people saying the government is doing a good job in ensuring those infected receive the best healthcare has increased from 54% to 61% during this period.

(YouGov India)

August 18, 2021

 

(Turkey)

6 Out Of 10 People Think A Closure May Occur Again

Due to the increase in the number of cases, 64% of the society thinks that a closure may occur again. Although the proportion of people who are anti-vaccine and unsure about the vaccine is lower, the opinions of all masses are similar that there will be no closure. 23% of the society is of the opinion that a closure will not occur again. Only one third of the citizens are in favor of restrictions… 55% of the society does not want a curfew to be imposed at night after today. The rate of those who want such a ban is 31%.

(Ipsos Turkey)

16 August 2021

 

7 Out Of 10 Parents Now Want Face-To-Face Education For Their Children

While 57% of parents stated that the decision announced by the Ministry of National Education that schools will switch to face-to-face education on September 6 was the right decision, 32% of them thought that this decision was wrong. 7 out of 10 parents now want their children to go to school for face-to-face education. Only 15% say they don't want to send it. The rest have not made a more definitive decision on this matter. On September 6, 47% of parents thought that schools could be opened at the beginning of July, but by the end of July due to the rapid increase in the number of cases. this view drops to 30%.

(Ipsos Turkey)

9 August 2021

 

MENA

(UAE)

Most UAE Residents 74% Think That The Tokyo Olympics' Theme Will Help Promote D&I Globally Among The People

UAE which is home to people from over 200 nationalities resonated well with the D&I theme of the Tokyo Olympics. YouGov survey results show that a vast majority of respondents (74%) think that it will further help promote diversity and inclusion among people across all countries.

A majority of UAE residents think ensuring equal opportunities to all irrespective of any form of differentiation (56%) and greater transparency among the sporting communities to ensure fair play (52%) would ultimately lead to better adoption of D&I in the field of sports. 

(YouGov MENA)

August 19, 2021

 

AFRICA

(Sudan)

More Than Three-Fourths (78%) Of Sudanese “Agree” Or “Strongly Agree” That The Lockdown Was Necessary To Limit The Spread Of Covid-19

Three-fourths (78%) of Sudanese “agree” or “strongly agree” that the lockdown was necessary to limit the spread of COVID-19. However, two-thirds (66%) say they and their households found it “difficult” or “very difficult” to comply with lockdown restrictions. A majority (65%) of citizens say government is doing “fairly badly” or “very badly" in managing the response to the pandemic

(Afrobarometer)

11 August 2021

 

(Zimbabwe)

Eight In 10 Adult Zimbabweans (80%) Say They Have Heard About Social Media

Eight in 10 adult Zimbabweans (80%) say they have heard about social media. More than four out of 10 (42%) say they get news from social media “every day” or “a few times a week” Among those who have heard about social media: Nine out of 10 (91%) say it makes people more informed about current events, and about half (49%) believe it helps people have more impact on political processes.

(Afrobarometer)

13 August 2021

 

(Gambia)

The Proportion Of Gambians Who Describe Their Personal Living Conditions As “Fairly Good” Or “Very Good” Has Decreased Drastically, From 66% In 2018 To 35%

Six in 10 Gambians (60%) say the country is heading in “the wrong direction,” double the proportion recorded in 2018 (29%). The proportion of Gambians who describe their personal living conditions as “fairly good” or “very good” has decreased drastically, from 66% in 2018 to 35%. The proportion who say they went without basic necessities such as enough food, enough water, and medical care during the previous year increased significantly compared to 2018.

(Afrobarometer)

17 August 2021

 

(Zambia)

Most Zambians (84%) Prefer Democracy To Any Other Form Of Government

Most Zambians (84%) prefer democracy to any other form of government and reject non-democratic alternatives such as one-party rule (83%), military rule (90%), and one-man rule (91%). Six in 10 citizens (59%) say they are not satisfied with the way democracy is working in the country. Three-quarters (76%) of Zambians say leaders should be chosen through regular,

open, and honest elections, while just 22% would prefer to adopt other methods for

choosing the country’s leaders.

(Afrobarometer)

18 August 2021

 

The Proportion Of Zambians Who Say That “Most” Or “All” Officials In The Presidency Are Corrupt Has Increased Steadily From 27% In 2014 To 40% In 2020

Seven in 10 Zambians (71%) say levels of corruption have increased over the past year, up from 55% in 2014. Eight in 10 citizens (79%) say the government is handling the fight against corruption “fairly badly” or “very badly” – a significant increase from 66% recorded in 2014. More than three-fourths (79%) of Zambians think ordinary people risk retaliation or other negative consequences if they report corruption to the authorities.

(Afrobarometer)

19 August 2021

 

WEST EUROPE

(UK)

Six In Ten Britons (60%) Support The Introduction Of Vaccine Passports Sooner Rather Than Later

The latest YouGov research reveals that public opinion has stayed much the same since March, with six in ten Britons (60%) supporting the introduction of vaccine passports sooner rather than later, including 30% who “strongly” support their implementation. This is compared to 58% of the public who backed their use in March this year. Some 32% of Britons would be opposed to the use of vaccine passports during the vaccination programme, similar to the 34% who held this opinion in the spring.

(YouGov UK)

August 09, 2021

 

Two In Five Britons Think Mortgage Applications Are Unfair

Data from YouGov Direct shows that, when asked about the tradeoff between taking a mortgage with a higher deposit requirement – but a lower overall interest rate – or a mortgage with a smaller deposit and a higher interest rate, two-thirds would go for the former (65%). Just one in five would opt for a lower-deposit, higher-interest plan (20%): with the proportion remaining the same for Britons aged 18-34. The 5% deposit plan may not move the needle for would-be homeowners.

(YouGov UK)

August 10, 2021

 

Britons Are Most Likely To Support Banning Imports Of Goods Linked To Deforestation (60%)

A new survey by Ipsos MORI shows widespread support for various actions by the UK government to address climate change, both domestically and around the world. Considering international actions they’d like to see the UK government take to address climate change, Britons are most likely to support banning imports of goods linked to deforestation (60%) and the use of Britain’s diplomatic influence to persuade other countries to increase their emissions reduction targets (58%). Only around 1 in 10 oppose these actions (10% and 8% respectively).

(Ipsos MORI)

10 August 2021

 

Half (53%) Of Tory Voters Say They Immigration Is A Top Issue Facing The Country

Our latest survey has 50% of Britons putting health as one of their top three national concerns, followed in second place by the economy on 44%. Among Conservative voters, however, immigration is the most pressing concern right now. Half (53%) of Tory voters say they immigration is a top issue facing the country, about the same as the number concerned about the economy (52%). Conservatives are notably less worried about health, which only 42% chose, placing it third overall.

(YouGov UK)

August 11, 2021

 

Two In Three Support Increasing National Insurance For Social Care Reform Or To Reduce NHS Backlog

Ipsos MORI’s latest Political Monitor reveals around half (49%) of Britons want the Government to increase spending on public services, even if that means higher taxes or more government borrowing. A third (34%) think spending on public services should be kept at the current level, whilst just 9% say spending should be reduced to allow for tax cuts or less government borrowing.

(Ipsos MORI)

11 August 2021

 

The Public Are Divided On Whether The Government Should End Universal Credit Top Up, With Two In Five Britons (38%) Supporting The Move, While An Equal Share (39%) Oppose It

The government has announced that it will phase out the £20-a-week universal credit top up this autumn. It has been in place since the start of the pandemic. The public are divided on the issue, with two in five Britons (38%) supporting the move, while an equal share (39%) oppose it. Public opinion falls notably along party lines. Approaching two thirds of Conservative voters (63%) are in favour of ending the £20 top-up, which is being paid out to more 5.5 million households in the UK claiming universal credit. Only one in five (20%) oppose it.

(YouGov UK)

August 12, 2021

 

The Public Are Strongly Agreed (87%) In Saying It Has Done A Good Job In Ensuring The Public Are Vaccinated

When asked to consider Boris Johnson’s government’s performance since it was elected in December 2019, the public are strongly agreed (87%) in saying it has done a good job in ensuring the public are vaccinated as soon possible (even 79% of Labour supporters agree). Nearing half are also positive about its managing of the economy (49%) and keeping unemployment down (48%) and increasingly so since last December (when results were 44%, 41% respectively). However, sizeable proportions still think they are performing badly on each (40% economy, 36% unemployment, and rising to 53% and 47% respectively among 18-34 year olds).

(Ipsos MORI)

12 August 2021

 

Almost Half Of Brits 45% With Opinion On The Matter Say Manchester City Are Favourites To Win League

As the Premier League 2021-22 season gets underway, we ask the public which club they feel is the best prepared to win the title. Manchester City emerge as the overwhelming favourites, drawing a vote of confidence from almost half of all those who picked a club (45%). Manchester United take the second spot with 12% of people with an opinion choosing the Red Devils as season favourites. Chelsea bag 11% of the votes despite investing heavily this summer, while 2019-20 champions Liverpool have been picked as the season favourite by just 9% of those with an opinion, following a disappointing domestic campaign last time out.

(YouGov UK)

August 13, 2021

 

44% Of Britons Supported The Withdrawal Of Western Troops From Afghanistan

Last week, YouGov research showed found that 44% of Britons supported the withdrawal of western troops from Afghanistan, compared to 26% who were opposed. Now, with Afghanistan falling back under complete Taliban control for the first time since 2001, people tend to think it was the wrong decision to pull military support out of the country. Two fifths (42%) of Britons say it was the wrong decision to withdraw troops, compared to 28% who think it was right to do so. Three in ten Britons (31%) are unsure.

(YouGov UK)

August 16, 2021

 

Two Thirds (68%) Support Maintaining The Rule Stating That The Value Of The State Pension Must Rise Each Year, Compared To Just 11% Who Want To Scrap It

The pensions triple lock rule was introduced in 2011 by the coalition government. The rule states that the value of the state pension must rise each year in line with the highest of three possible figures: how much the average price of goods and services have risen nationally; how much average earnings have risen nationally; or by 2.5%. Given a brief description of what the triple lock is (see chart), the public strongly wants to keep it in place. Two thirds (68%) support maintaining the rule, compared to just 11% who want to scrap it.

(YouGov UK)

August 18, 2021

 

British Public Equally Divided Over Withdrawal Of Military From Afghanistan

New polling shows that Britons are split on the British military withdrawing from  Afghanistan, with 39% of people saying it was the right thing to do and 40% saying it was the wrong decision.  The British public are more critical of the US withdrawing its troops, with 47% of people saying it was the wrong thing to do, however it is still not the majority of people. Nearer a third (31%) think the US made the right decision pulling their troops out of Afghanistan.

(Ipsos MORI)

19 August 2021

 

Gun ownership: three quarters of Britons want stricter laws

A new YouGov survey reveals that 76% of people think the current gun ownership laws should be tightened. This includes 39% who think there should be greater restrictions on ownership and a similar proportion (37%) who would back an outright ban on civilian firearm ownership. The survey shows that while similar proportions of all age groups think that gun ownership should be outlawed, those aged 65 and over are nearly twice as likely to say laws should be tightened (52%) compared to 18- to 24-year-olds (27%).

(YouGov UK)

August 20, 2021

 

(Hungary)

A Total Of Three Quarters Of The Respondents See A Chance For Another Covid-19 Wave In Hungary

One third of the adult population is convinced of the sharp increase in the number of cases in the autumn, and a total of three quarters of the respondents see a chance for another Covid-19 wave in Hungary. Young adults and rural residents are more optimistic (18% of 30-39 year olds are not at all afraid of the epidemic, 20% of those living in the village), while those over 40, capital city and graduates are above average. they are prepared for a significantly higher proportion of new diseases (79-88%.

(Ipsos Hungary)

12 August 2021

 

NORTH AMERICA

(USA)

Among All U.S. Adults, 63% Favor Making Tuition At Public Colleges Free

Among all U.S. adults, 63% favor making tuition at public colleges free, including 34% who strongly favor the proposal. Slightly more than a third oppose tuition-free college (36%), with 20% strongly opposed. These views are little changed over the past year. Large shares of Black (86%), Hispanic (82%) and Asian American (69%) adults favor making college free for all Americans, compared with 53% of White adults. And while 73% of adults under age 30 favor this proposal, only about half (51%) of those ages 65 and older support it.

(PEW)

AUGUST 11, 2021

 

 International Travel Is Something A 71% Majority Of U.S. Adults Have Done At Some Point In Their Lives

In March 2021 – the most recent month for which data is available – around 3 million American citizens traveled outside of the country. This is shy of the nearly 4 million U.S. citizens who traveled abroad in March 2020 as the coronavirus pandemic unfolded. Whether before or during the pandemic, international travel is something a 71% majority of U.S. adults have done at some point in their lives, according to a June Pew Research Center survey. By contrast, around a quarter (27%) have not traveled abroad.

(PEW)

AUGUST 12, 2021

 

Among U.S. Adults Overall, 53% Say Increased Attention To That History Is A Good Thing For Society

Opinion on the current national reckoning over the history of slavery and racism in the United States casts these divisions into stark relief: Among U.S. adults overall, 53% say increased attention to that history is a good thing for society, while 26% say it is a bad thing and another 21% say it is neither good nor bad. Among Black adults, 75% say heightened public attention to this topic is a good thing, with 54% saying it is “very good” for society. Majorities of Asian American (64%) and Hispanic (59%) adults also view this positively, though much smaller shares say it is a very good thing, compared with Black adults.

(PEW)

AUGUST 12, 2021

 

Nearly Half 49% Of U.S. Adults Have Tried Marijuana

The percentage of U.S. adults who say they have tried marijuana has ticked up to 49%, the highest Gallup has measured to date. More than 50 years ago, just 4% said they had tried the drug, but that percentage surpassed 20% in 1977, 30% in 1985 and 40% in 2015. A much smaller proportion of U.S. adults, 12%, say they "smoke marijuana." The percentage of current marijuana smokers has been steady in recent years, varying between 11% and 13% after increasing from the 7% Gallup initially measured in 2013.

(Gallup)

AUGUST 17, 2021

 

Roughly Half Of U S  Adults (48%) Now Say The Government Should Take Steps To Restrict False Information

Roughly half of U.S. adults (48%) now say the government should take steps to restrict false information, even if it means losing some freedom to access and publish content, according to the survey of 11,178 adults conducted July 26-Aug. 8, 2021. That is up from 39% in 2018. At the same time, the share of adults who say freedom of information should be protected – even if it means some misinformation is published online – has decreased from 58% to 50%.

(PEW)

AUGUST 18, 2021

 

Roughly Seven-In-Ten Rural Americans (72%) Say They Have A Broadband Internet Connection At Home

Rural Americans have made large gains in adopting digital technology over the past decade and have narrowed some digital gaps. Roughly seven-in-ten rural Americans (72%) say they have a broadband internet connection at home, according to a Pew Research Center survey of U.S. adults conducted from Jan. 25 to Feb. 8, 2021. Rural residents have seen a 9 percentage point rise in home broadband adoption since 2016, when about six-in-ten (63%) reported having a high-speed internet connection at home.

(PEW)

AUGUST 19, 2021

 

(Canada)

Out Of The Starting Blocks - More Of The Same: Liberals 36%, Conservatives 31%, NDP 20%, Bloc 6%, Green 5%

If the election were held tomorrow, the results would be very similar to the results of Ipsos’ polling last month: the Liberals under Justin Trudeau would receive 36% of the decided popular vote nationally (unchanged since last month), while Erin O’Toole and the Conservatives would receive 31%, up 1 point. Jagmeet Singh’s NDP would receive 20% of the popular vote, unchanged, while Annamie Paul and the Green Party would receive the support of 5% of Canadians, up 2 points. Just 1% would vote for Maxime Bernier and the People’s Party (down 1 point), and 1% would vote for some other party (down 1 point).

(Ipsos Canada)

17 August 2021

 

Strong Majority Of Canadians (Almost 80%) Support Vaccination Mandates; Open To Measures Including Vaccine Passports

According to a recent Ipsos poll, in light of the recent mandate that vaccination will be mandatory for air and train travel as well as for public servants. A strong majority agree with the recently announced mandatory vaccination for federal public servants (80%) and the requirement for proof of vaccination for flying on an airplane or taking a train international or inter-provincially (82%). Similar proportions support mandatory vaccination for healthcare workers (84%), for teachers (81%), or vaccine passports to enter restaurants, gyms, or other indoor spaces (72%).

(Ipsos Canada)

19 August 2021

 

Justin Trudeau Still Best to Lead Country, Say Canadians (39%), Ahead of O’Toole (25%) and Singh (23%)

Most Canadians (39%) feel that Justin Trudeau is the federal party leader best fit to be the Prime Minister of Canada. Around a quarter see Erin O’Toole (25%) and Jagmeet Singh (23%) as the best candidates, while Canadians expressed much lower levels of confidence in Yves-François Blanchet (4%, 18% in Quebec) and Annamie Paul (4%). Six percent said they did not know or refused to comment. Notably, based on current Ipsos polling data, Trudeau and Singh both poll ahead of overall vote intention for their parties (i.e., 36% of Canadians intend to vote for the Liberal party, and 39% say Trudeau is the best fit to be the Prime Minister), while O’Toole, Blanchet, ad Paul trail behind.

(Ipsos Canada)

20 August 2021

 

AUSTRALIA

22% Of Esports Fans (~ 1.2 Million People) Say They Will Buy A Car Within The Next 12 Months

According to YouGov data, there are 5.37 million Australians (18+) who have an interest in esports. This is already almost half of the 10.8 million Australians with the same level of interest in AFL and closing in on the 6.32 million Australian NRL fans. This is not a ‘niche’ group. Likewise, they are far more likely to be in the market for credit cards, loans and saving & investment accounts. When it comes to advertising, esports fans are more likely to say that advertising plays a role in their purchasing decisoins.

(YouGov Australia)
August 11, 2021

 

Australians Are Set To Spend Around $800 Million On Father’s Day Presents This Year With Alcohol And Food Topping The Gifts For Dad

Australians are set to spend around $800 million on Father’s Day presents this year with alcohol and food topping the gifts for dad, according to research from the Australian Retailers Association (ARA) in conjunction with Roy Morgan.  People who plan on buying a gift will spend an average of $93 with 79% spending the same amount as last year with 13% to spend slightly more. Most (62%) already know what gift they’ll purchase while 38% are yet to decide.

(Roy Morgan)

August 15 2021

 

NAB Likely To Leapfrog ANZ With 4.5 Million Customers Following Agreement To Purchase Citigroup’s Australian Business

A look at the geographical distribution of the customers of the two banks shows that the Victorian-based NAB draws well over a fifth of its customers from Melbourne (22.6%) compared to only 18.9% in Sydney whereas this situation is reversed for Citibank – over a quarter of their 1 million odd customers are in Sydney (25.5%) compared to only 18.5% in Melbourne.

(Roy Morgan)

August 17 2021

 

MULTICOUNTRY STUDIES

Pfizer Vaccine Received A Net Positive Safety Score In Every Country Surveyed

In both UAE and KSA, the Pfizer vaccine received a net positive score of +67 and +61 respectively, with the public seeing the vaccine to be more safe than unsafe. This is higher than its score in European countries like Bulgaria (+22), Croatia (+46), Romania (+42), Greece, and Hungary (+55 each). In fact, the lowest score the Pfizer vaccine received was in Bulgaria (+22), where 48% see it as safe compared to 25% who see it as unsafe.

(YouGov MENA)

August 9, 2021

Source: https://mena.yougov.com/en/news/2021/08/09/how-safe-are-covid-19-vaccines-seen-internationall/

 

Globally A Majority Of People Perceive A Strong Social Division, But This Is Particularly Common In South Africa (74%), Hungary (72%) And Brazil (72%)

Seen globally, in 16 of a total of 25 nations surveyed, a majority of people perceive a strong social division, but this is particularly common in South Africa (74%), Hungary (72%) and Brazil (72%). A majority of the population in this country also believes in a society of elites: two out of three respondents (66%), for example, are of the opinion that the economic system in Germany is manipulated in favor of the rich and powerful. Almost three quarters (73%) also believe that politicians always find a way to protect their privileges.

(Ipsos Germany)

9 August 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/de-de/deutsche-fuhlen-sich-von-eliten-abgehangt-neigen-aber-weniger-zu-populismus-als-andere-nationen

 

More Than Four Million People Are Known To Have Died Globally From Coronavirus During The Pandemic

The research, conducted in June in 20 European countries, shows that Hungarians are the most likely to believe lockdowns ‘do more harm than good’, at 42%. This is twice as many as those believing they ‘do more good than harm’, at 20%. Another three in ten Hungarians (28%) say they do both equally. Sentiment is similar in other southern and eastern European countries. A third of Croatians (34%), Bulgarians (33%) and Greeks (33%) say the drawbacks of lockdowns outweigh the benefits – in each case higher than the proportions that believe the opposite to be true (19% of Croatians, 30% of Bulgarians and 26% of Greeks).

(YouGov UK)

August 17, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2021/08/17/how-many-europeans-are-sceptical-lockdowns-and-hea

 

An Average Of 58% Globally Say They Want To Do Sports But There Is No Time To Do It (37%)

According to our Global Advisor research, the Netherlands is the most physically active of the 29 countries surveyed. On average, he spends 12.8 hours a week doing physical exercise or team sports, twice the global average of 6.1 for 29 countries. On the other hand, Brazilians appear to be the country with the least physical activity at three hours a week. Other countries reporting less than four hours of exercise per week are: France (3.7), Chile (3.7), Italy (3.6) and Japan (3.3).

(Ipsos Turkey)

17 August 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/tr-tr/spor-yapmak-istiyoruz-ama-vaktimiz-yok

 

Only Seven Percent Of The Global Public In 29 Countries Who Participated In The Survey Believe That Their Country's Economies Are Recovering

According to the research we conducted for the World Economic Forum, respondents from 29 countries state that at least two years are required for the country's economies to recover due to the Covid-19 pandemic, three out of every four individuals. Only seven percent of the global public who participated in the survey believe that their country's economies are recovering, and 19 percent say they will recover within the next year. China is one of the most optimistic countries. 56% of respondents from China state that their economy is recovering. The most pessimistic country is Russia, with 66% of those who think that the economic recovery will take more than three years.

(Ipsos Turkey)

18 August 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/tr-tr/ulke-ekonomilerinin-kisa-zamanda-toparlanacagina-inanilmiyor

 

In Surveys Conducted In 2020-1, More Than Four-In-Ten Say That U S Foreign Assistance Helps Advance Women’s Rights And Strengthens Civil Society In Their Country

Since 1946, the U.S. is estimated to have provided more than $346 billion dollars of assistance to countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. Nevertheless, many citizens across the region actually favored an increase in aid from the U.S.  More than half of citizens in Jordan (69 percent), Sudan (63 percent), Lebanon (54 percent), Morocco (53 percent) and Egypt (52 percent) held this view, as did significant percentages in Palestine (49 percent), Iraq (48 percent), and Tunisia (45 percent).  Only in Libya and Algeria did fewer than a third favor increased levels of assistance from the U.S.

(Arabbarometer)

August 19, 2021

Source: https://www.arabbarometer.org/2021/08/u-s-assistance-to-mena/

 

ASIA

703-704-43-01/Polls

Two-Thirds Of Urban Indians (67%) Think P.V.Sindhu Has Made The Country Proud At An International Sports Event

The recently concluded Tokyo Olympics 2020 saw India’s best rankings in over four decades and gave it its second gold medal. On the occasion of India’s 74th Independence Day, YouGov asked respondents which sportsperson according to them has made India proud at an international level.

Data from the survey conducted between 3 and 6 August among 1135 respondents reveals two-thirds of urban Indians (67%) think P.V.Sindhu has made the country proud at an international sports event.

The ace badminton player became India's first female double Olympic medallist after her recent success at the Tokyo Olympics 2020. Apart from this, Sindhu also has five World Championship medals to her name and is the recipient of some of the highest honourable awards like Padma Bhushan and Padma Shree. 

Following P.V.Sindhu, more than half think six times world champion and boxing sensation- Mary Kom (53%) and the Queen of Indian track and field- PT Usha (52%) have made the country proud. Both of them are decorated Olympians who have won accolades for the country and became a source of inspiration to many.

The list is dominated by sportswomen, including mega achievers like Sania Mirza (45%), Saina Nehwal (44%), Geeta Phogat (35%) and Sakshi Malik (34%).

The recent Tokyo Olympics 2020 showed the strength of women power and it is not surprising to see these names in the list. Two in five urban Indians (40%) think this year’s Olympic winner Mirabai Chanu has made the country proud at an international event, whereas Karnam Malleswari- India’s first female weightlifting champion to win a medal at Olympics is considered inspiring by more than one in five (21%).

Shining bright among these female achievers is one of India’s best sportspersons- Milkha Singh. Popularly known as ‘The Flying Sikh’, the country’s highly revered sports legend is considered inspiring by nearly half of urban Indians (46%). The Padma Shri awardee has has made the country proud at various international sporting events, including the Olympics.

Talking about Olympics, the recent Tokyo Olympics 2020 participants and winners feature heavily in the list, including gold medallist Neeraj Chopra. Around a quarter of urban Indians (24%) think the star athlete has made the country proud. The results may have varied now (survey was done prior to his win) after his epic victory at the games. Nonetheless, he is considered inspiring by a notable proportion of urban Indians.

India’s first and the other Olympic gold winner Abhinav Bindra is also part of the rankings (35%). The rest of the list features other Olympic winners and participants, such as Lovlina Borgohain (23%), Bajrang Punia (20%), Deepika Kumari (26%), Vinesh Phogat (19%), Dutee Chand (18%), Rani Rampal (17%) and Manika Batra (15%).

Apart from these young athletes, the country celebrates some senior sportsmen who represented the country at various International platforms and made us proud. The list comprises of Indian hockey wizard- Dhyan Chand (33%), former Indian Hockey team captain- Dhanraj Pillay (22%), the Olympic silver medal winner - Rajyavardhan Singh Rathore (18%) and former Olympian shooter- Randhir Singh (9%).

(YouGov India)

August 12, 2021

Source: https://in.yougov.com/en-hi/news/2021/08/12/urban-indians-think-pv-sindhu-mary-kom-and-pt-usha/

 

703-704-43-02/Polls

Between June 1 And 8, 56% Respondents Said The Government Has Been Handling The Rollout Of Vaccines Very Or Somewhat Well

YouGov’s Covid-19 Public Monitor has been tracking public sentiment since the outbreak first happened in 2020. Data from the monitor shows that urban Indian public’s perception of the Central Government handling the Coronavirus crisis has improved since June. During the wave run between June 1 and 8, 56% respondents said the government has been handling the rollout of vaccines very or somewhat well.

With the rapid progression of the vaccination drive and its extension to 18+ adults, this number has increased steadily, to 64% at the end of July (between 16-23 July).

Similarly, the percent of people saying the government is doing a good job in ensuring those infected receive the best healthcare has increased from 54% to 61% during this period.

We also see improvement in areas related to finance and economy. Between 1-8 June, 38% respondents said the government is doing a good job in protecting people’s jobs and 46% said the same about the government protecting the economy. This number increased to 42% and 54% by the end of July.

The story is the same when looking at people’s perception of the state government’s handling of the crisis. However, there are differences within regions. South India has made a notable improvement in terms of public perception around the state government’s rollout of vaccines, with 68% of residents in the region saying the government has done a very or somewhat well job in this area as compared to 60% who said this in June.

Similarly, there have been improvements in public perception in this area in both North & Central India as well as Eastern India between June and July, while perception among residents of West India has been stable throughout this period.

Overall, the percentage of people saying compared to one month ago the Coronavirus situation in India is getting better has gone up from 68% during the first wave in June to 76% at the end of the July.

Even though public confidence in recovery has improved since June, almost all the surveyed respondents are concerned about the third wave of the Coronavirus pandemic to some extent.

Three in ten (29%) are extremely concerned, with respondents from East & North East India most likely to say this than the rest (at 33%). On the other hand, 7% of all respondents are not concerned at all. A quarter (24%) are ‘somewhat concerned’, with residents of West India more likely than the rest to say this (at 29%).

When asked how much will the Central government’s management of the pandemic influence their voting choice in the 2024 Lok Sabha Elections, half the respondents said it is going to affect their choice ‘very much’, 36% said it will have a ‘somewhat’ effect on their intention and 14% said it will not influence their decision at all.

(YouGov India)

August 18, 2021

Source: https://in.yougov.com/en-hi/news/2021/08/18/urban-indias-perception-governments-handling-coron/

 

703-704-43-03/Polls

6 Out Of 10 People Think A Closure May Occur Again

Due to the increase in the number of cases, 64% of the society thinks that a closure may occur again. Although the proportion of people who are anti-vaccine and unsure about the vaccine is lower, the opinions of all masses are similar that there will be no closure. 23% of the society is of the opinion that a closure will not occur again.

16 August-1Half of the Society Doesn't Want the Curfew Between 21:00 at Night and 05:00 in the Morning

Although the number of cases raises concerns that there will be a lockdown again, half of the population does not want any restrictions. Only one third of the citizens are in favor of restrictions… 55% of the society does not want a curfew to be imposed at night after today. The rate of those who want such a ban is 31%.

16August-2The Ratio of Those Who Don't Want Restaurants / Cafes to be Closed 50%

Again, half of the society does not want such a restriction. While 26% of the citizens think that only closed areas should be closed, the rate of those who think that they should be closed completely is 7%.

16August-3
Half of the Society Against the Intercity Travel Restriction

Similar to other restrictions, half of the society thinks that there should not be an intercity restriction. Again, only 3 out of 10 people are in favor of such a restriction.

16August-4

The Closing of Businesses such as Cinemas, Theaters and Performance Centers is Not Wanted by Half of the Society

Citizens have a similar view on the closure of businesses such as cinemas and theaters. The rate of those who think that such places should not be closed is 48%, the rate of those who think that they should be closed is 32%.

16August-5

6 out of 10 people think that it would be the right decision to request a PCR test from people who do not have 2 doses of vaccine in places where people are sitting next to each other.

The opinions of those who are vaccinated or who are positive about the vaccine and those who are anti-vaccine differ clearly on the decision to ask for a PCR test from people who are not vaccinated against the coronavirus in places such as cinemas, theaters, intercity buses, and planes where people are sitting side by side. While 65% of those who have been vaccinated or who are positive about the vaccine think that people who are not vaccinated should be asked for a PCR test when entering such places, 67% of those who are against the vaccine are against such a decision.

16August-6

Sidar Gedik, CEO of Ipsos Turkey, made the following evaluations about the data; The epidemic affects our lives like a pendulum; When the number of cases/losses decrease with vaccines and precautions, the restrictions relax, the pendulum goes to one end, we relax with the longing for our old lives, we socialize, the disease spreads again, the restrictions begin to be discussed again, the pendulum moves to the other end.
There has been an increase in the number of patients and casualties in recent weeks, on the other hand, we want to open schools with face-to-face education soon, institutions are planning to return their employees working from home to offices again. In all these circumstances, what should be done to contain the epidemic? Two out of three predict that we will experience a re-closure. But there is a gap between this estimate and considerations of measures. One out of every two people expresses a negative opinion about measures such as curfews, closing of restaurants/cafes, travel restrictions, closing of theaters/cinemas. On average, 20% of the population has no idea about reintroducing these measures, while 30% think they should be reinstated. 
The Minister of Health has signaled that the vaccination decision will not be left to choices in the next period. This is a topic of great debate not only in our country, but all over the world. Currently, in many cases, PCR testing is mandatory instead of vaccination. Six out of ten people support the idea of ​​making PCR testing mandatory in places where people are close to each other, such as cinemas, theatres, travel vehicles. For those who are against the vaccine, this ratio is almost reversed, two out of three people who are against the vaccine are also against compulsory testing. It is very clear that we, as humanity, need to determine principles that can be applied not only in Turkey but also in all countries regarding the necessity or freedom of vaccination and testing. 

(Ipsos Turkey)

16 August 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/tr-tr/toplumun-64u-tekrar-bir-kapanma-yasanabilecegini-dusunuyor

 

703-704-43-04/Polls

7 Out Of 10 Parents Now Want Face-To-Face Education For Their Children

While 57% of parents stated that the decision announced by the Ministry of National Education that schools will switch to face-to-face education on September 6 was the right decision, 32% of them thought that this decision was wrong.

parent1

71% of Parents Want to Send Their Children to School for Face-to-face Education

7 out of 10 parents now want their children to go to school for face-to-face education. Only 15% say they don't want to send it. The rest have not made a more definitive decision on this matter. 

parent2

However, due to the increase in the number of cases, only 30% of parents think that schools can switch to face-to-face education.

Although the majority of parents want to send their children to school for face-to-face education and half of them approve the decision of schools to switch to face-to-face education on September 6, 47% of parents thought that schools could be opened at the beginning of July, but by the end of July due to the rapid increase in the number of cases. this view drops to 30%.

parent3

71% of Parents Agree with Vaccination Mandatory for Teachers to Open Schools

Parents want teachers to be vaccinated so that their children can go to school. However, when it comes to the necessity of vaccinating parents, the rate of parents who support this decision drops to 60%.

parent4

Parents Are More Cautious When It Comes To Vaccinate Their Children

Compared to both the vaccination of teachers and the vaccination of parents, parents are more reluctant to be vaccinated when it comes to their children. While 45% of parents with children between the ages of 13-18 state that they would like their children to be vaccinated, this rate drops to 20% when children are in the 7-12 age group.

parent4

Sidar Gedik, CEO of Ipsos Turkey, conveying his evaluations on the subject: “Schools could not be fully open for about 3 semesters. From time to time, students in some classes were able to attend face-to-face education, but the majority of students had to study remotely. Children faced significant disadvantages during their physical and mental development period. And of course, the fact that their children were at home all this time brought additional burdens for working parents. A large-scale resumption of face-to-face education in the new academic year is of great importance.

This was the intention announced by the Ministry of National Education. We will see how the reshuffle in the ministry will affect this intention.

Yes, the intention and need is to open schools, but on the other hand, the number of cases has exceeded the daily limit of twenty-five thousand. The belief that schools will open weakens as the weeks progress. In the past weeks, one out of every two parents thought that schools would open, but the rate has dropped to one-third.

Unfortunately, the rate of those over the age of 18 who have received 2 doses of vaccine still has not reached 50%. All this creates hesitation among parents to send their children, even if schools are opened. Approximately six out of ten parents agree with the decision to open schools, while three do not. There is a more positive picture when it comes to sending their child to school, with seven out of ten parents stating that they will send their child to school. However, this rate was eight in ten in the previous weeks, increasing cases seem to have started to affect negatively.

Action must be taken to open schools. The most basic action is vaccination. 71% of parents state that teachers should be vaccinated, and even six out of ten parents believe that parents who want to send their children to school should also be vaccinated. The issue of this determined attitude towards the necessity of vaccination is relaxed as much as children, one of the two parents thinks that children between the ages of 7-12 should not be vaccinated, the rate of parents who say that children in this age group should also be vaccinated is 33%. As the age of the child grows, the supporter of vaccination also increases, the picture is reversed for the children of the 13-18 age group, one of the two parents thinks that the children in this group should be vaccinated. 

As a parent, I believe it is imperative that we all focus on doing what is necessary for schools to open in September. It's not just something students, teachers, and parents can achieve. As a society, we must work to create the necessary conditions.

Being able to re-start face-to-face education is very important in every aspect, pedagogically, physically/mentally, socially, economically.” Said.

(Ipsos Turkey)

9 August 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/tr-tr/her-10-ebeveynden-7si-cocuklari-icin-artik-yuz-yuze-egitim-istiyor

 

MENA

703-704-43-05/Polls

Most UAE Residents 74% Think That The Tokyo Olympics' Theme Will Help Promote D&I Globally Among The People

In the true spirit of sport, the Tokyo Olympics 2020 tried to lift the human spirit amid a looming pandemic and brought the world together by serving as a platform to demonstrate solidarity against racism and inequality. Under the tagline, “Know Differences, Show Differences” the 2020 Summer Games were committed to incorporate Diversity & Inclusion (D&I) into every aspect of its planning and operations.

UAE which is home to people from over 200 nationalities resonated well with the D&I theme of the Tokyo Olympics. YouGov survey results show that a vast majority of respondents (74%) think that it will further help promote diversity and inclusion among people across all countries.

Furthermore, UAE residents expressed their opinions about factors that could help foster D&I in international sports. A majority of UAE residents think ensuring equal opportunities to all irrespective of any form of differentiation (56%) and greater transparency among the sporting communities to ensure fair play (52%) would ultimately lead to better adoption of D&I in the field of sports. 

There are some examples from this year’s Olympics that not just set the ground strong for future games, but also introduced the world to a new era of inclusivity. For the first time in the history of the Olympics, hundreds of publicly out LGBTQ Olympians participated (more than triple the number who participated at the 2016 Rio Games) which reflected the growing acceptance of the LGBTQ community in sports and society. Additionally, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) also published a new edition of its 'Portrayal Guidelines' that aimed at promoting a balanced coverage and fair portrayal of sportspeople in all their diversity.

The event further tried to show inclusivity by implementing activities such as Diversity & Inclusion assistance training (where staff members with an impairment served as speakers), lower shopping counters (for people in wheelchairs to easily access them), and conducting awareness workshops, etc. Such measures seem to fall in line with the views expressed in the survey, where 47% of the respondents indicated that in order to boost D&I at international sporting events, all staff of sporting committees and participants should be encouraged to learn about each other’s culture.

Apart from this, more than two in five respondents think increasing commitment towards following the ethics among all sports-related communities (45%), assurance of safe work culture and practice for employees (44%), and increasing women participation in sports organizations and governing bodies (41%) are some of the ways that can help permeate D&I culture in sports at an international level. As a matter of fact, the Tokyo Olympics 2020 served as a landmark in gender equality by featuring the largest number of female athletes in the Olympics (49% according to the IOC quota allocation).

The survey data also reflects the popular public perception of values in relation to the Olympic Games. The Olympics is always thought to be more than just a platform for sports. Most of the UAE residents feel that international sporting events like Olympics help boost sportsmanship (42%) and friendship among nations (35%). Some believe that it helps promote fitness (28%), world peace (27%), and unity in diversity (26%). While a few equate it to be a way of strengthening more positive human emotions like tolerance, happiness, and hope.

(YouGov MENA)

August 19, 2021

Source: https://mena.yougov.com/en/news/2021/08/19/tokyo-olympics-2020-can-commitment-towards-diversi/

 

AFRICA

703-704-43-06/Polls

More Than Three-Fourths (78%) Of Sudanese “Agree” Or “Strongly Agree” That The Lockdown Was Necessary To Limit The Spread Of Covid-19

A majority of Sudanese say that last year’s lockdown imposed by the government was necessary to limit the spread of COVID-19, in spite of the toll it took on the economy and people’s livelihoods, the latest Afrobarometer survey shows.

Two in three Sudanese say they found it difficult to comply with lockdown restrictions. A similar majority say the government is doing “fairly badly” or “very badly" in managing the response to the pandemic.

The study also shows a less-than-encouraging attitude toward vaccines: Few Sudanese trust their government to ensure that COVID-19 vaccines are safe, and only half say they are likely to try to get vaccinated. Most believe that prayer is more effective than a vaccine in preventing the spread of COVID-19.

Key findings

 More than three-fourths (78%) of Sudanese “agree” or “strongly agree” that the lockdown was necessary to limit the spread of COVID-19 (Figure 1).

 However, two-thirds (66%) say they and their households found it “difficult” or “very difficult” to comply with lockdown restrictions (Figure 2).

 A majority (65%) of citizens say government is doing “fairly badly” or “very badly" in managing the response to the pandemic (Figure 3).

 Six in 10 Sudanese (59%) say they trust the government “just a little” or “not at all” to ensure that any COVID-19 vaccine is safe before it is used in this country (Figure 4).

Only half (51%) say they are “somewhat likely” or “very likely” to try to get vaccinated.

 Almost nine in 10 citizens (86%) say prayer is more effective than a vaccine would be in preventing COVID-19 infection (Figure 5).

(Afrobarometer)

11 August 2021

Source: https://afrobarometer.org/sites/default/files/press-release/Sudan/news_release_sudanese_receptive_to_lockdown_despite_difficulty_complying-afrobarometer-10aug21.pdf

 

703-704-43-07/Polls

Eight In 10 Adult Zimbabweans (80%) Say They Have Heard About Social Media

Most Zimbabweans who are familiar with social media see its overall effects on society as positive, according to a new Afrobarometer survey. Most citizens want to protect unrestricted access to social media and the Internet.

Most citizens are familiar with social media, and about four in 10 say it is a regular source of news for them.

A large majority of those familiar with social media say it helps keep people informed about current events, though many are also alert to negative effects of social media, such as making people less tolerant and more likely to believe lies.

Key findings

 Eight in 10 adult Zimbabweans (80%) say they have heard about social media (Figure1).

 More than four out of 10 (42%) say they get news from social media “every day” or “a few times a week” (Figure 2).

 Among those who have heard about social media:

                                    

o Nine out of 10 (91%) say it makes people more informed about current events, and about half (49%) believe it helps people have more impact on political processes (Figure 3).

o But seven out of 10 (71%) also say social media makes people more likely to  believe false information, and 44% think it makes people more intolerant of those who hold different opinions.

o Overall, a majority (61%) see the effects of social media on society as “somewhat  positive” or “very positive” (Figure 4).

 Almost two-thirds (65%) hold the view that social media and the Internet help keep citizens informed and active and that unrestricted access to them must be protected

(Figure 5).

(Afrobarometer)

13 August 2021

Source: https://afrobarometer.org/sites/default/files/press-release/Zimbabwe/zimbabwe_news_release_on_social_media_13aug21.pdf

 

703-704-43-08/Polls

The Proportion Of Gambians Who Describe Their Personal Living Conditions As “Fairly Good” Or “Very Good” Has Decreased Drastically, From 66% In 2018 To 35%

A growing number of Gambians think their country is heading in the wrong direction and

want their government to prioritize the economy and public service delivery, the latest

Afrobarometer study shows.

Over the past three years, the share of Gambians who describe the country’s economy

and their personal living conditions as good has decreased significantly, while more

citizens are going without basic necessities such as enough food, enough water, and

medical care.

Approval ratings for the government and leaders have declined significantly since 2018.

Health, management of the economy, water supply and education are the most important problems that citizens want the government to address.

The Gambia is ranked 172th out of 189 countries in the 2019 United Nations Development

Programme’s Human Development Index. The country is currently implementing a threeyear National Development Plan that is expected to end in 2021.

Key findings

▪ Six in 10 Gambians (60%) say the country is heading in “the wrong direction,” double the proportion recorded in 2018 (29%) (Figure 1).

▪ The proportion of Gambians who describe their personal living conditions as “fairly good” or “very good” has decreased drastically, from 66% in 2018 to 35% (Figure 2).

▪ The proportion who say they went without basic necessities such as enough food, enough water, and medical care during the previous year increased significantly compared to 2018 (Figure 3).

▪ Health (39%), management of the economy (38%), water supply (27%), and education (26%) are the most important problems that citizens want the government to address (Figure 4).

o The share of respondents who cite management of the economy as a priority problem has more than doubled since 2018.

▪ Citizens’ ratings of the government’s performance on the economy, infrastructure, and basic services have declined sharply over the past three years (Figure 5 and

Figure 6).

▪ Approval ratings for the performance of key government leaders have also declined since 2018 (Figure 7).

(Afrobarometer)

17 August 2021

Source: https://afrobarometer.org/sites/default/files/press-release/The%20Gambia/news_release-gambians_say_country_going_in_the_wrong_direction-afrobarometer_17aug21.pdf

 

703-704-43-09/Polls

Most Zambians (84%) Prefer Democracy To Any Other Form Of Government

Zambia’s third transfer of presidential power via elections occurred against a backdrop of

overwhelming popular support for democracy, clean elections, and multiparty competition,

an analysis of recent Afrobarometer findings shows.

A survey in late 2020 found that even though a majority of Zambians are not satisfied with the

way their democracy is working, most reject authoritarian alternatives to democracy and say

the country should choose leaders through regular, open, and honest elections.

A majority of respondents also say the country needs many political parties to make sure that

citizens have real choices in who governs them.

Zambia joined a small group of African countries to experience three transfers of power via

elections when last week’s general election, the country’s seventh since the reintroduction of

multiparty democracy in 1991, resulted in a clear victory for the opposition United Party for

National Development. Sixteen political parties participated in the election.

According to the Christian Churches Monitoring Group, while specific processes require

improvement, the Electoral Commission of Zambia delivered an election that reflects the will

of the people.

Key findings

 Most Zambians (84%) prefer democracy to any other form of government and reject

non-democratic alternatives such as one-party rule (83%), military rule (90%), and

one-man rule (91%) (Figure 1).

o Six in 10 citizens (59%) say they are not satisfied with the way democracy is

working in the country (Figure 2).

 Three-quarters (76%) of Zambians say leaders should be chosen through regular,

open, and honest elections, while just 22% would prefer to adopt other methods for

choosing the country’s leaders (Figure 3).

 More than seven in 10 Zambians (74%) say many political parties are needed to make

sure that citizens have real choices in who governs them. Only one-fourth (25%) of

citizens say political parties create division and confusion, and Zambia doesn’t need

to have many of them (Figure 4).

(Afrobarometer)

18 August 2021

Source: https://afrobarometer.org/sites/default/files/press-release/Zambia/news_release-support_for_democracy_and_elections_strong_in_zambia-afrobarometer-18aug21.pdf

 

703-704-43-10/Polls

The Proportion Of Zambians Who Say That “Most” Or “All” Officials In The Presidency Are Corrupt Has Increased Steadily From 27% In 2014 To 40% In 2020

A growing number of Zambians say corruption is on the rise and the government is doing a

poor job of fighting it, a recent Afrobarometer study shows.

As in many African countries, the police are most widely perceived as corrupt, followed by

officials in the Office of the Presidency, local government councilors, and members of

Parliament.

An overwhelming majority of Zambians think that ordinary people risk retaliation if they report

corruption to the authorities.

Key findings

 Seven in 10 Zambians (71%) say levels of corruption have increased over the past

year, up from 55% in 2014 (Figure 1).

 Eight in 10 citizens (79%) say the government is handling the fight against corruption

“fairly badly” or “very badly” – a significant increase from 66% recorded in 2014

(Figure 2).

 The police are most widely perceived as corrupt: 54% of Zambians say “most” or “all”

police officials are corrupt. Substantial proportions of the population see widespread

corruption in the Office of the Presidency (40%), among local government councillors

(36%), and among members of Parliament (36%) (Figure 3).

o The proportion of Zambians who say that “most” or “all” officials in the Presidency

are corrupt has increased steadily from 27% in 2014 to 40% in 2020.

 More than three-fourths (79%) of Zambians think ordinary people risk retaliation or

other negative consequences if they report corruption to the authorities (Figure 4).

(Afrobarometer)

19 August 2021

Source: https://afrobarometer.org/sites/default/files/press release/Zambia/news_release_zambians_say_corruption_is_on_the_rise-stk-bh-18aug21.pdf

 

WEST EUROPE

703-704-43-11/Polls

Six In Ten Britons (60%) Support The Introduction Of Vaccine Passports Sooner Rather Than Later

The Conservative party is currently at war with itself over the proposed introduction of vaccine passports. Prime Minister Boris Johnson is leading the charge to introduce the controversial measures, which would see people need to prove their vaccination status to access certain venues. However, many Conservatives MPs threaten revolt over their implementation.

The latest YouGov research reveals that public opinion has stayed much the same since March, with six in ten Britons (60%) supporting the introduction of vaccine passports sooner rather than later, including 30% who “strongly” support their implementation. This is compared to 58% of the public who backed their use in March this year.

Some 32% of Britons would be opposed to the use of vaccine passports during the vaccination programme, similar to the 34% who held this opinion in the spring.

 Despite continued Tory infighting over the policy, two thirds of their voters (64%) would support plans for vaccine passports. Sentiment is similar among Labour voters, 60% of whom would also be in favour.

The previous iteration of this survey found that young people were divided over the prospect of vaccine passports during the vaccination programme, however now 18 to 24-year olds tend to oppose their introduction (48%) compared to 38% in support. Over half of 25-49 year olds (53%), and seven in ten of those 50 and over (70%) would support their introduction.

Similarly to the last survey, support for vaccine passports after everyone has been offered a vaccine is slightly higher (68%) than rolling the system out while the vaccination programme is still underway.

What venues should require vaccination passports?

In Ireland, proof of vaccination and photo ID are already a requirement for adults wishing to dine indoors at restaurants and cafes, with Costa going viral as a result. In the UK, however, no such rules yet exist, but would Britons support them if they were introduced?

Two thirds of people (67%) think that care homes should mandate full COVID-19 vaccination for visitors, compared to 24% who think they should not. 

Around half of people also think that pubs and bars (54%), gyms (53%) and cinemas (52%) should have requirements for patrons to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 before being allowed to enter.

Last month, the University and College Union called on the government to require full vaccination for students who wished to return to University campuses for in-person teaching – something the government has now ruled out. However, the public tends to think it should be the rule, with 49% in favour of vaccine passports for university campuses, versus 40% opposed. Among 18-24 year olds, this opposition rises to 47%, with only 29% thinking campuses should require vaccine passports.

 The British Chambers of Commerce have suggested that three in ten workplaces could ask staff to provide proof of vaccination before they are allowed to return to work, Public opinion is divided, however, with 43% in favour of workplaces using vaccine passports, and 46% opposed.

While Costa has to require proof of vaccination in Ireland, Britons do not think cafés in the UK should have to as well, with 52% opposed to cafes using vaccine passports. Previously, 44% of people thought cafes should implement vaccine passports, compared to 37% who hold that opinion now. 

Places that people are least likely to want to see vaccine passports include supermarkets (27%, -4 points since March) and outdoor areas such as pub gardens (26%, -7pts) and garden centres (25%, -4pts).

(YouGov UK)

August 09, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2021/08/09/britons-still-broadly-support-covid-19-vaccine-pas

 

703-704-43-12/Polls

Two In Five Britons Think Mortgage Applications Are Unfair

In April 2021, the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced that the government would be backing 95% loan-to-value mortgages for properties valued up to £600,000. The move is part of the Conservatives’ broader plan to turn “Generation rent into Generation Buy”. 

But is there any appetite for it? 

Data from YouGov Direct shows that, when asked about the tradeoff between taking a mortgage with a higher deposit requirement – but a lower overall interest rate – or a mortgage with a smaller deposit and a higher interest rate, two-thirds would go for the former (65%). Just one in five would opt for a lower-deposit, higher-interest plan (20%): with the proportion remaining the same for Britons aged 18-34. The 5% deposit plan may not move the needle for would-be homeowners.

But if lower-deposit mortgages aren’t necessarily the answer to their woes, there may well be appetite for reforming the process of getting a mortgage. Two in five Brits (38%) think the criteria used to approve or deny mortgages are unfair, with less than a quarter (22%) saying the application process is fair. 

Banks could also benefit from providing current customers with more incentives to stick with the devil they know. While 18% of the public say that, if they were in the market for a new mortgage product, they would stay with their current provider, three-quarters (73%) say they would shop around for the best deal. There’s clearly at least some stickiness when it comes to finding a mortgage; if banks can find ways to reward the loyalty of long-time, householding customers, they may be rewarded in turn. 

(YouGov UK)

August 10, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/lifestyle/articles-reports/2021/08/10/two-five-britons-think-mortgage-applications-are-u

 

703-704-43-13/Polls

Britons Are Most Likely To Support Banning Imports Of Goods Linked To Deforestation (60%)

A new survey by Ipsos MORI shows widespread support for various actions by the UK government to address climate change, both domestically and around the world. Deforestation seems to be an important area to address among many Britons, both in the UK and abroad, while increased investment in renewable energies and improved emissions reduction targets around the world also receive large levels of support. 

Considering international actions they’d like to see the UK government take to address climate change, Britons are most likely to support banning imports of goods linked to deforestation (60%) and the use of Britain’s diplomatic influence to persuade other countries to increase their emissions reduction targets (58%). Only around 1 in 10 oppose these actions (10% and 8% respectively).

Support for international actions by the UK government to address climate change - Ipsos MORI

A majority of Britons would also like to see the UK government reduce emissions at a faster pace to set an example to other countries (56%), restrict trade with countries who do not commit to international climate targets (53%) and end their investments in coal, oil and gas projects abroad (51%). 

Just under half of Britons support giving financial aid, both to help developing countries adapt to the impacts of climate change and help developing countries reduce their emissions (both 44%), while around a quarter would oppose this (24% and 25% respectively. 

Looking closer to home, 7 in 10 (71%) support the increased investment of money in renewable energy here in the UK, only 7% oppose this. Over half (56%) would like to see the ban of all goods in the UK that are linked to deforestation, 1 in 10 oppose (11%). 

Less than half (44%) are in favour of removing all coal power from the UK, just under 1 in 5 would be against the UK government taking this action (17%). Only a third (35%) support the banning of sales of new petrol and diesel vehicles in the UK, a similar proportion are opposed (32%). 

Support for domestic actions by the UK government to address climate change - Ipsos MORI

As part of the UK’s international commitment to combat climate change, the government has committed to reducing greenhouse gas emissions by at least 68% by 2030. Most Britons believe this commitment is about right, 42% believe the government’s pledge is at the right level while a quarter (25%) say it is too ambitions and 17% say not ambitious enough. Only 4% of Britons say this commitment is unnecessary. However, in March 2021, only 3 in 10 (31%) of Britons said the UK government had a clear plan to tackle climate change.

Support for the UK’s 2030 greenhouse gas emissions target - Ipsos MORI 

Jessica Long, Head of Sustainability at Ipsos MORI, said:

Previous Ipsos MORI surveys have shown how keen Britons are for the government to take action against climate change, here we see particular interest in tighter regulations and increased investments.  As well as desires to see more done on home soil, there is  appetite and opportunity for the UK to be global leaders in the climate change fight.

(Ipsos MORI)

10 August 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/ipsos-mori/en-uk/britons-climate-change-priorities-august-2021

 

703-704-43-14/Polls

Half (53%) Of Tory Voters Say They Immigration Is A Top Issue Facing The Country

Every week, YouGov tracks the most pressing issues facing the country according to Britons. Unsurprisingly, concerns over health have consistently topped the tables since the beginning of the pandemic, along with fears for the economy.

Our latest survey has 50% of Britons putting health as one of their top three national concerns, followed in second place by the economy on 44%.

Among Conservative voters, however, immigration is the most pressing concern right now. Half (53%) of Tory voters say they immigration is a top issue facing the country, about the same as the number concerned about the economy (52%). Conservatives are notably less worried about health, which only 42% chose, placing it third overall.

https://d25d2506sfb94s.cloudfront.net/cumulus_uploads/inlineimage/2021-08-11/Tory%20immigration%20concern-01.png

Tory concern about immigration has been on an upward trend since the spring, with only around a third having put it in their top three from January to late March.

The general population currently puts immigration fourth on their list of concerns, at 31%, behind the environment at 34%.

Labour voters prove to be much more concerned about health than their Tory counterparts. More than six in ten (62%) say it is one of the top issues facing the country, 12pts higher than the population as a whole, and ranking first among Labour backers.

The environment is actually the second most worried about issue for Labour, at 45%, followed by the economy on 38%. Immigration ranks eighth for Labour voters, at 14%.

(YouGov UK)

August 11, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2021/08/11/despite-pandemic-immigration-conservative-voters-n

 

703-704-43-15/Polls

Two In Three Support Increasing National Insurance For Social Care Reform Or To Reduce NHS Backlog

  • Half favour increased public spending, even if it means higher taxes or borrowing
  • Majority say they are personally willing to pay more tax to achieve a “net zero” economy or help “level up” regions – but less so to reduce the deficit

Ipsos MORI’s latest Political Monitor reveals around half (49%) of Britons want the Government to increase spending on public services, even if that means higher taxes or more government borrowing. A third (34%) think spending on public services should be kept at the current level, whilst just 9% say spending should be reduced to allow for tax cuts or less government borrowing.

That said, support for increased public spending has been slipping from two in three (66%) towards the end of 2018 and a firmer majority (56%) just before the 2019 General Election. There are also partisan divides with 2019 Labour voters wanting more spending than Conservative supporters (74% vs 40%). Although even among those Conservatives, few (8%) favour cuts to spending, with 44% instead wanting to keep it at current levels.

Public opinion is divided over what the Government will actually do. Around a third each think it will either keep spending at current levels (34%) or reduce it (32%), whilst slightly fewer (27%) expect them to actually increase spending. This latter figure has dropped from over a third (35%) expecting increases in October 2019.

SpendingRumoured earlier in the summer, the poll also shows two in three would support a one percentage point increase in national insurance contributions to help pay for social care reform (64%) or to reduce the backlog in the NHS caused by the pandemic (65%). Around one in five oppose either of these proposals (18%, 19% respectively).

In both cases, there is little partisan divide, with similar levels of support from Conservative and Labour 2019 voters alike. However, although on balance still in favour of the tax increase, young people are relatively less supportive (in each case 56% of 18-34-year-olds versus 73% of those aged 55 or over).

TaxationThe majority also say they are personally willing to pay more in taxes to help pay for the cost of turning Britain into a “net zero” economy (60% - defined as ‘meaning significantly reducing carbon emissions from many different activities, such as driving cars, producing food, and use of electricity, and balancing out the remaining emissions by technologies and actions that reduce greenhouse gases’) or to fund the “levelling-up” agenda to reduce inequalities between different regions of the country (51%). Around one in four say they are unwilling in each case (22%, 25% respectively).

Traditional party divides are more apparent here. Three in four (74%) Labour 2019 voters are willing to pay more tax to achieve net zero, compared with half of Conservatives (52%). This is similar when looking at levelling up (67% of Labour supporters willing versus 42% of Conservatives). In this case, young people are most likely to say they are very willing to pay taxes to help pay for the cost of net zero (39%, vs 26% of those aged 55 and over).

There is somewhat less willingness among the public to pay more to reduce the deficit in public finances caused by increased spending during the pandemic. Forty-four per cent say they are willing to pay more to help reduce this, whilst just over a third (35%) are not (with little difference by 2019 vote).

Meanwhile, whilst still marginally positive, economic optimism continues to slip from its peak a couple of months ago. Forty-four percent think the economy will improve over the next twelve months, whilst two in five (39%) think it will get worse. This leaves an Economic Optimism Index of +5 (down from +22 in June).

Gideon Skinner, Head of Politics at Ipsos MORI, says of the findings:

Even though it might have been dampened by the pandemic, there is still some appetite amongst Britons for more spending on public services. In particular, they can be persuaded to support tax rises that will be used to pay for improvements to public services, as Gordon Brown found in 2002 and as we may find again with proposals to raise National Insurance to pay for social care reform or to clear the NHS backlog. Even past Conservative supporters are in favour of these, although young people are slightly less supportive of the rise than older groups (unlike taxes to pay for net zero).

(Ipsos MORI)

11 August 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/ipsos-mori/en-uk/two-three-support-increasing-national-insurance-social-care-reform-or-reduce-nhs-backlog

 

703-704-43-16/Polls

The Public Are Divided On Whether The Government Should End Universal Credit Top Up, With Two In Five Britons (38%) Supporting The Move, While An Equal Share (39%) Oppose It

The government has announced that it will phase out the £20-a-week universal credit top up this autumn. It has been in place since the start of the pandemic. This has prompted criticism from six Conservative former work and pensions secretaries who have urged the chancellor not to end the “vital” uplift.  

The public are divided on the issue, with two in five Britons (38%) supporting the move, while an equal share (39%) oppose it.

Public opinion falls notably along party lines. Approaching two thirds of Conservative voters (63%) are in favour of ending the £20 top-up, which is being paid out to more 5.5 million households in the UK claiming universal credit. Only one in five (20%) oppose it.

Nearly identical shares of Labour voters are of the opposite opinion, with 61% against ending the higher payments, while 20% support it.

Britons more likely to think benefits are not generous enough than too lavish

Three in ten people (31%) say universal credit payments tend to be ‘not generous enough’ – twice as many as those saying they are ‘too generous’ (15%). Another fifth of the public believe they are about right (22%), while a third (33%) are unsure.

Predictably, this issue separates those on the left from those on the right. But Labour voters are much more likely to say benefit payments are too low than Tory voters are to say they’re too high.

Half of Labour-supporting Britons (52%) say universal credit payments are ‘not generous enough’ – a view shared by 14% of Conservative voters. Meanwhile, one in four Tory supporters (27%) believe they are ‘too generous’, echoed by a mere one in twenty Labour voters (5%).

Another 30% of Conservative supporters and 17% of Labour voters say universal credit payments are about right.

(YouGov UK)

August 12, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2021/08/12/britons-are-split-whether-government-should-end-un

 

703-704-43-17/Polls

The Public Are Strongly Agreed (87%) In Saying It Has Done A Good Job In Ensuring The Public Are Vaccinated

Ipsos MORI’s latest Political Monitor shows the Conservatives retain a clear lead over the Labour party amid positive sentiment towards their handling of the pandemic, the economy and unemployment levels. Looking ahead, however, the public is more critical towards the government’s delivery of improved public services, crime, and levelling up.

Government record

When asked to consider Boris Johnson’s government’s performance since it was elected in December 2019, the public are strongly agreed (87%) in saying it has done a good job in ensuring the public are vaccinated as soon possible (even 79% of Labour supporters agree). Nearing half are also positive about its managing of the economy (49%) and keeping unemployment down (48%) and increasingly so since last December (when results were 44%, 41% respectively). However, sizeable proportions still think they are performing badly on each (40% economy, 36% unemployment, and rising to 53% and 47% respectively among 18-34 year olds).

Govt. performanceThe Government’s performance is seen less positively on handling taxation and public spending (33% say good job, 50% say bad job), maximising Britain’s global influence (38% vs 45%), handling Scottish and Welsh devolution (25% vs 44%) and handling Brexit (35% vs 57%). Nevertheless, there are slight improvements since December on Brexit and Britain’s global influence, although a slight drop on handling taxation and public expenditure.

The worst rated areas for the Government are its attempts to level up by reducing regional inequalities (22% good job vs 55% bad), improve the NHS (26% vs 65%), improve the education system (23% vs 57%), handle race relations (27% vs 56%) and deal with crime (26% vs 58%).

People in North England are among the most critical of the levelling up agenda, with nearing two in three (64%) saying they are doing bad job, compared with 44% in the South (excluding London). Meanwhile, crime is the issue where Conservative supporters are most concerned, with as many critical as positive (40% say good job, 45% say bad job).

Political trackers and COVID-19

Satisfaction with the Government has recovered slightly from a dip last month, with two in five (39%, +4 over the month) saying they are satisfied and half dissatisfied (51%, -4). These scores are reflected in Mr Johnson’s personal ratings, with similar proportions satisfied (41%, +3) and dissatisfied (52%, -2). Whilst both scores result in negative net ratings (of -12, -11 respectively), looking back into Ipsos MORI’s long-term trends they are bettered only by Tony Blair at this point into his premiership.

Meanwhile, Keir Starmer’s ratings show little sign of recovery. Twenty-seven per cent say they are satisfied with him (unchanged), whilst the majority (53%) are dissatisfied (+3). This results in a net-satisfaction score of -26, which is behind ratings for Tony Blair and David Cameron at similar points as Opposition leaders, and more comparable with those seen by Ed Miliband and William Hague.

Ed Davey continues to struggle breaking through with the public. One in five (21%) are satisfied, and a third (32%) dissatisfied (both barely changed since last month), whilst nearly half (47%) say they don’t know.

Satisfaction

Following the ending of lockdown restrictions, the public are now less negative about the Government’s handling of the pandemic than last month, but opinion is still divided. Forty-four per cent say they are handling it well (+3), whilst slightly fewer say badly (37%, -6). Furthermore, with the double-vaccinated no longer having to self-isolate if ‘pinged’ from next Monday (in England), the majority (55%) say this decision is being taken about the right time. One in five say it is too soon (23% - Labour supporters most cautious at 35%) whilst another fifth (17%) say too late.)

Meanwhile, there has been little change since July in headline voting figures:

  • Conservatives: 41% (+1)
  • Labour: 30% (-1)
  • Liberal Democrats: 13% (-)
  • Greens: 8% (+2)

Gideon Skinner, Head of Politics at Ipsos MORI, says of the findings:

As Parliament rises for the summer, the public’s scorecard on government delivery suggests the Conservatives’ lead is helped by positive ratings for their handling of the economy and unemployment during the pandemic (although less so among young people), and most strikingly for the vaccination programme, which gets high approval across the board. However, looking ahead the Prime Minister will also want to focus on public services – specifically the NHS, education and crime (where even his own supporters are worried), while so far the public don’t see much evidence of progress on levelling-up regional inequalities. Even so, Keir Starmer’s Labour party is struggling to make headway against this, with little sign of improvement this month.

(Ipsos MORI)

12 August 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/ipsos-mori/en-uk/britons-give-positive-scores-governments-record-vaccines-economy-and-unemployment-critical-nhs

 

703-704-43-18/Polls

Almost Half Of Brits 45% With Opinion On The Matter Say Manchester City Are Favourites To Win League

As the Premier League 2021-22 season gets underway, we ask the public which club they feel is the best prepared to win the title. Manchester City emerge as the overwhelming favourites, drawing a vote of confidence from almost half of all those who picked a club (45%).

Pep Guardiola’s team, which has claimed the Championship in three of the past four seasons, has been picked the favourite for another title by almost four times as many people as any of the other 19 teams.

Manchester United take the second spot with 12% of people with an opinion choosing the Red Devils as season favourites. Chelsea bag 11% of the votes despite investing heavily this summer, while 2019-20 champions Liverpool have been picked as the season favourite by just 9% of those with an opinion, following a disappointing domestic campaign last time out.

Even fans of Man City’s top rivals have declared them as favourites to lift the trophy at the end of 2021-22 season. Among fans of the four clubs that followed Man City on the League table in 2020-21 – Manchester United, Liverpool, Chelsea and Leicester City – two in five think Man City will go all the way once again (39%).

Manchester United and Chelsea retain their positions as the second and third favourites among this subset of people, although the former picks up a much more significant lead.

(YouGov UK)

August 13, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/sport/articles-reports/2021/08/13/almost-half-brits-say-manchester-city-favourites

 

703-704-43-19/Polls

44% Of Britons Supported The Withdrawal Of Western Troops From Afghanistan

Over the last twenty years, 454 British forces personnel or MOD civilians have died while serving in Afghanistan. Now, following the withdrawal of western forces, the Afghan government has collapsed and Kabul has fallen to rapidly advancing Taliban forces. Helicopter evacuations of foreign diplomats, as well as scenes of widespread panic across the city, are reminiscent of the fall of Saigon in 1975.

Was it right for the western allies to withdraw?

Last week, YouGov research showed found that 44% of Britons supported the withdrawal of western troops from Afghanistan, compared to 26% who were opposed. Now, with Afghanistan falling back under complete Taliban control for the first time since 2001, people tend to think it was the wrong decision to pull military support out of the country.

Two fifths (42%) of Britons say it was the wrong decision to withdraw troops, compared to 28% who think it was right to do so. Three in ten Britons (31%) are unsure.

Conservative voters are more likely to have a view than Labour voters over the withdrawal. Approaching half of Tories (48%) think the withdrawal is wrong, compared to 40% of Labour voters. Another one in three Conservatives (33%) say it was right, compared to 25% of Labour supporters.

Was it right to intervene in the first place?  

The invasion of Afghanistan in 2001 was prompted by the refusal of the ruling Taliban government to extradite Osama bin Laden after the September 11th terror attacks.

In 2001, YouGov research for the Guardian and Observer found 68% of the public in favour of deploying British troops to the country – but now the public is split on whether intervention in Afghanistan was the right thing to do.

Some three in ten (31%) think the intervention of western nations was right, while 32% aren’t sure, and 36% think it was the wrong thing to do.

Conservative voters (40%) are more likely than Labour supporters (25%) to say the intervention was right, with nearly 40% and 39% respectively thinking it was the wrong thing to do. Labour voters are much more likely to be unsure (35% versus 21% of Conservatives).

What has it achieved?

Afghanistan now ceases to be, with the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan that was defeated in 2001 reinstated following the victory of the Taliban.

The majority of Britons (53%) think that two decades of war in the country did not ultimately achieve anything - including over half of both Labour (56%) and Conservative (59%) voters.

As well as thinking the war has achieved nothing, Britons tend to think the war has not improved the lives of people living in Afghanistan. A third (35%) say the war has not made life any better or worse for people there, while 27% think it has made life worse for them. Only 15% think conditions in the country have improved following the involvement of the western allies.

Ultimately, the British people tend to consider the outcome of the conflict as a loss for the Western nations involved (46%). Among older Britons, who no doubt remember the start of the invasion, the conflict is seen as a loss, including half of 50-64 year olds (53%) and six in ten (60%) of those 65 and over.

Despite the rapid resurgence of the Taliban, a third of Britons (36%) think that we neither lost nor won the conflict.

(YouGov UK)

August 16, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2021/08/16/britons-react-collapse-afghanistan

 

703-704-43-20/Polls

Two Thirds (68%) Support Maintaining The Rule Stating That The Value Of The State Pension Must Rise Each Year, Compared To Just 11% Who Want To Scrap It

The pensions triple lock rule was introduced in 2011 by the coalition government. The rule states that the value of the state pension must rise each year in line with the highest of three possible figures: how much the average price of goods and services have risen nationally; how much average earnings have risen nationally; or by 2.5%.

The goal of the policy is to keep the standard of living among state pensioners rising in tandem with the rest of society. But because of quirks in the rules, some are now calling for the triple lock to be modified or abandoned.

Given a brief description of what the triple lock is (see chart), the public strongly wants to keep it in place. Two thirds (68%) support maintaining the rule, compared to just 11% who want to scrap it.

The policy as described is popular across all of society, garnering the support of the youngest Britons (18-29 year olds want to keep it by 53% to 12%) and the non-retired population (by 63% to 13%). Unsurprisingly the retired are its biggest fans, with 85% wanting to keep the triple lock.

The generations differ on whether it is fair for the state pension to go up while workers are struggling

Of course, the triple lock sounds perfectly nice when described in isolation. But there are times when quirks in the way the rules work bring up a question of fairness. The coronavirus pandemic is such a time.

Because so many low-paid workers lost their jobs during the pandemic, this means that the average wage value in Britain has artificially risen; not as a result of people’s wages going up, but as a result of those on lower wages dropping out of the calculation.

Consequently, the state pension is set to rise by 8% this year – because the triple lock requires that it rise by the highest out of prices, wages, or by 2.5% – which many consider unfair at a time when many working people have lost their jobs or not seen their wages increase.

So we wanted to test where Britons stand on potential unfairness in the way the triple lock can work. We asked people how fair it would be for the state pension to increase in various negative scenarios.

The results show a huge divide between young and old, working and retired.

Asked whether it would be fair to raise the value of the state pension at a time when average earnings among working people are falling, retired Britons think this is a fair situation by 61% to 24%. Non-retired Britons are more split, with 37% seeing it as fair and 36% as unfair.

Age is the key dividing line. While 63-64% of those aged 60 and above consider it fair, this falls to just 24-26% of the under-40s.

https://d25d2506sfb94s.cloudfront.net/cumulus_uploads/inlineimage/2021-08-10/Chart%202.png

Younger Britons also tend to think it is unfair to increase the state pension during times of rapidly increasing unemployment, and are split on the fairness of boosting pensions when wages are stagnant or public spending cuts need to be made.

In all three of these examples, those aged 40 and over are much more likely to see them as fair than unfair. The same goes for both retired and non-retired Britons as a whole.

Britons – including younger people – don’t see unfairness as a reason to not follow the triple lock rules

We then tied these negative scenarios directly to the triple lock, and asked Britons whether they would prefer to keep the triple lock in place and allow them to happen, or suspend or scrap the pensions rule in order to prevent them.

Despite having previously identified the scenarios as unfair, many under-40s baulk at amending the triple lock in order to stop them coming to pass.

For instance, in the event that the state pension would increase at a time when average earnings were falling, by 30% to 23%, 18-29 year olds would rather keep the triple lock than make an exception and only give pensioners a smaller increase that year. Among people in their thirties those figures are 33% and 25% respectively.

https://d25d2506sfb94s.cloudfront.net/cumulus_uploads/inlineimage/2021-08-10/Chart%203%20v2.png

When combining the responses on the fairness question with what they would do about it in reality, we see that about a third of those young people who think each scenario is unfair nevertheless wish to keep the triple lock in place.

These switchers are enough to put the ‘keep the triple lock’ side slightly higher than the ‘make an exception in this case’ side in all scenarios among young people. Among older people the preference across all scenarios is strongly in favour of keeping the triple lock in place.

Sentiment in favour of keeping the triple lock in place is even stronger among all groups when our survey posed the choice between keeping the triple lock or scrapping it entirely to avoid unfairness.

It is also worth noting that huge numbers of young people answered “don’t know” on questions of fairness (31-43%) and what to do in the various scenarios (39-49%), while older Britons are much more likely to have an opinion.

Can it ever be right to freeze or decrease the value of the state pension?

While thinking it perfectly fair for workers to fund their pension increases at a time when their own wages are falling, pensioners reject the notion that they too could be asked to sacrifice their income.

Nine in ten retired Britons (91%) say there are no circumstances where it could be acceptable to reduce the value of the state pension, and 71% say the same about freezing it.

Other Britons tend to agree when it comes to cutting pensions, but aren’t so sure that there is no case for ever freezing them. Non-retired Britons are split, with 40% saying they can see that it might be right to fix the value of state pensions for a period versus 38% who reject this possibility.

Four in ten Britons under the age of 50 (43-45%) likewise say there is a case to be made for freezing the state pension on occasion. Among 18-29 year olds this is twice as many as think maintaining the state pension at a certain rate unconscionable (22%).

https://d25d2506sfb94s.cloudfront.net/cumulus_uploads/inlineimage/2021-08-10/Cutting%20freezing%20state%20pension-01.png

(YouGov UK)

August 18, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/economy/articles-reports/2021/08/18/britons-wouldnt-ditch-pensions-triple-lock-rule

 

703-704-43-21/Polls

British Public Equally Divided Over Withdrawal Of Military From Afghanistan

New polling shows that Britons are split on the British military withdrawing from  Afghanistan, with 39% of people saying it was the right thing to do and 40% saying it was the wrong decision.  The British public are more critical of the US withdrawing its troops, with 47% of people saying it was the wrong thing to do, however it is still not the majority of people. Nearer a third (31%) think the US made the right decision pulling their troops out of Afghanistan.

Britons are split on the British military withdrawing from Afghanistan, with 39% of people saying it was the right thing to do and 40% saying it was the wrong decision.

When it comes to future interventions, if the Taliban regime commits widespread human rights abuses or allows extremist groups to operate in Afghanistan, the most popular options are diplomatic/economic interventions (34%) and humanitarian interventions (32%), with the a third  agreeing with each  of these options.  One in five (22%) would support military interventions and a similar proportion (19%) think Britain shouldn’t intervene at all.   There are, however, significant differences between Conservative and Labour voters, with Conservative more likely to favour military intervention (29% vs. 21% of Labour voters) whereas Labour voters would support an humanitarian intervention (25% vs. 42%).

When It comes to future interventions by Britain, if the Taliban regime commits widespread human rights abuses or allows extremist groups to operate in Afghanistan, the most popular options are diplomatic/economic interventions (34%) and humanitarian interventions (32%), with the a third  agreeing with each  of these options.

The majority of people (52%) don’t think the British military campaign was effective in bringing stability to Afghanistan. Just one in three (34%) think it has been effective, which is down from 42% in 2015.

The majority of people (52%) don’t think the British military campaign was effective in bringing stability to Afghanistan. Just one in three (34%) think it has been effective, which is down from 42% in 2015.

The public also remain split on whether the military campaign was successful in preventing Afghanistan from being used as a base for terrorists to attack British interests. Two in five (42%) think it was effective, whilst another two-fifths (41%) say it wasn’t – this compares to 41% (effective) and 49% (ineffective) in 2015.

The public also remain split on whether the military campaign was successful in preventing Afghanistan from being used as a base for terrorists to attack British interests. Two in five (42%) think it was effective, whilst another two-fifths (41%) say it wasn’t – this compares to 41% (effective) and 49% (ineffective) in 2015.

Ben Page, CEO of Ipsos MORI, said:

The British public is divided over whether or not Britain was right to withdraw forces from Afghanistan, with 39% saying it was the right thing to do and 40% opposed. More feel America was wrong to withdraw, but even here not a majority (47%).   In terms of what happens next only 19% say we should do nothing; most want humanitarian measures and sanctions against the regime and humanitarian aid.

(Ipsos MORI)

19 August 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/ipsos-mori/en-uk/britons-are-split-over-afghanistan-military-withdrawal

 

703-704-43-22/Polls

Gun ownership: three quarters of Britons want stricter laws

Following the recent tragic shootings in Plymouth, Priti Patel has announced new measures on civilian gun ownership. Those wishing to have a firearms license in the UK will now have to undergo a mental health check with a doctor, as well as disclose medical conditions to police officers.

A new YouGov survey reveals that 76% of people think the current gun ownership laws should be tightened. This includes 39% who think there should be greater restrictions on ownership and a similar proportion (37%) who would back an outright ban on civilian firearm ownership.  

Around one in six (17%) think the current gun laws are about right, and 3% think they should be relaxed.

The survey shows that while similar proportions of all age groups think that gun ownership should be outlawed, those aged 65 and over are nearly twice as likely to say laws should be tightened (52%) compared to 18- to 24-year-olds (27%). A further 22% of 18- to 24-year-olds say that current firearm laws are about right, twice as high as among those aged 65 and over (11%).

Both Labour and Conservative voters would back tighter laws over firearms. While Conservative voters are more likely to favour increased restrictions on gun ownership (46%), some 30% would back a total ban on ownership. Nearly half of Labour voters (47%) want to see a total ban, while 33% want stricter laws. Some 19% of Conservatives and 16% of Labour voters say that the current laws are about right, with 4% of Tories and 1 % of Labour voters wanting the rules relaxed.

These latest results show more people in favour of tighter gun control (76%) than a previous iteration of this survey from 2010 (69%) – including an additional 6% of people in favour of a total ban. However, this increase may be the effect of the recent Plymouth shooting - further study at a later date will be needed to see if attitudes have changed for the long term. 

(YouGov UK)

August 20, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2021/08/20/gun-ownership-three-quarters-britons-want-stricter

 

703-704-43-23/Polls

A Total Of Three Quarters Of The Respondents See A Chance For Another Covid-19 Wave In Hungary

One third of the adult population is convinced of the sharp increase in the number of cases in the autumn, and a total of three quarters of the respondents see a chance for another Covid-19 wave in Hungary.

FIGURE: How likely do you consider the fourth wave of the disease to be in Hungary this autumn? (on the basis of the adult population, N = 1,000 people)

Probability of the fourth wave


Young adults and rural residents are more optimistic (18% of 30-39 year olds are not at all afraid of the epidemic, 20% of those living in the village), while those over 40, capital city and graduates are above average. they are prepared for a significantly higher proportion of new diseases (79-88%.

In stark contrast to the above, the results suggest that only one-sixth of the population would still maintain the restrictions still in place, while nearly two-thirds would ease them.

FIGURE: Do you think it is still necessary to maintain the current restrictive measures in Hungary? (on the basis of the adult population, N = 1,000 persons / month)

Abolition of restrictions

 

Again, those under 40 can be singled out as a social segment in favor of opening up (more than a third of them would remove all restrictions). In contrast, the population over the age of 60 remains cautious (half as much in favor of lifting the rules).

Although the trend experienced earlier seems to have stopped, the daily practice of Hungarians still shows that the mutations of the virus that are still present are basically harmless .

FIGURE: Which of the following activities is true for you? (on the basis of adult population, N = 1,000 persons / month)

Personal protection methods

 

 

Significant differences by population segment can also be reported in this case, where the age of the respondents proves to be the dominant segmentation factor: the older ones are more cautious, the younger people live community life more boldly.

- adds Annamária Földes, the leader of the research.

This time, Ipsos' research also mapped the shopping habits of the population, according to which Hungarians spend more now than before the pandemic. With a 58% majority estimating the same level of spending, they reported 23% higher and 14% lower household spending. The largest increases were reported by those over 60 (spending 30% more), graduates (28%) and Budapest (30%).

FIGURE: How much do you feel about shopping compared to the period before the coronavirus epidemic? (on the basis of the adult population, N = 1,000 people)

Household expenditure

 

Ipsos' international  research series ,  What Worries the World , has been measuring household inflation fears every month for more than a decade, in which Hungary was in the more optimistic half of the international list. In line with the above results, the risk of money deterioration occupies Hungarians at an ever higher level, and a clear trend is beginning to emerge, according to which both absolute and relative indicators of inflation fears have increased in the recent period.

FIGURE: What is causing you concern? - Inflation (based on the adult population, Mo .: N = 500 persons / month)

Inflation fears

 

The results of the Ipsos Omnibus research represent the Hungarian population over the age of 18 according to the most important socio-demographic indicators (such as age, gender, education, region of residence, type of settlement). Since April 2020, the research company's Covid-19 database has expanded to more than 17,000 records, and the analyzes made from it, even individual, tailored to specific customer needs, can be purchased. Contact our experts for details.

(Ipsos Hungary)

12 August 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/hu-hu/jarvany-elotti-idoszakot-tulszarnyalo-lakossagi-koltesek

 

NORTH AMERICA

703-704-43-24/Polls

Among All U.S. Adults, 63% Favor Making Tuition At Public Colleges Free

American adults generally support making tuition free at public colleges and universities for all U.S. students, yet there are sizable partisan and demographic differences in views of tuition-free college.

Republicans, in particular, are divided by age and educational attainment in opinions on this issue, according to a new Pew Research Center survey conducted July 8-18, 2021.

Among all U.S. adults, 63% favor making tuition at public colleges free, including 34% who strongly favor the proposal. Slightly more than a third oppose tuition-free college (36%), with 20% strongly opposed. These views are little changed over the past year.

Large shares of Black (86%), Hispanic (82%) and Asian American (69%) adults favor making college free for all Americans, compared with 53% of White adults. And while 73% of adults under age 30 favor this proposal, only about half (51%) of those ages 65 and older support it.

A bar chart showing that among Republicans, there are age and educational differences in support for tuition-free college

Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents overwhelmingly favor making college tuition free for all American students (85% support this). While 63% of Republicans and Republican leaners oppose making college tuition-free, 36% support this.

There are significant differences in these views among Republicans and GOP leaners: Those under age 30 are nearly twice as likely as those 65 and older to support making college tuition free for all Americans (45% vs. 23%).

And while Republicans who have completed college mostly oppose making tuition free for all American students, the proposal draws more support from Republicans who do not have a four-year degree.

A bar chart showing that younger, non-college Republicans are the most supportive of free college tuition

The differences among Republicans are particularly stark when combining age and educational attainment. Among Republicans under age 50 who have not completed college, 52% favor making college tuition free for all Americans. Among Republican college graduates in this age group, only 30% support this.

Support for tuition-free college declines among older Republicans, regardless of whether or not they have completed college. However, even among Republicans ages 50 and older, those who have not completed college are more supportive of this proposal than those who have a college degree.

(PEW)

AUGUST 11, 2021

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/08/11/democrats-overwhelmingly-favor-free-college-tuition-while-republicans-are-divided-by-age-education/

 

703-704-43-25/Polls

 International Travel Is Something A 71% Majority Of U.S. Adults Have Done At Some Point In Their Lives

Americans are gradually returning to international travel, though international travel restrictions remain in place in many countries.

In March 2021 – the most recent month for which data is available – around 3 million American citizens traveled outside of the country. This is shy of the nearly 4 million U.S. citizens who traveled abroad in March 2020 as the coronavirus pandemic unfolded and far below the roughly 8 million who did so in March 2019, according to U.S. Department of Commerce data. But it represents a significant uptick over the low point in the late spring of 2020, when only around 1 million Americans or fewer left the United States. Still, international travel by Americans remains far below pre-pandemic levels.

A line graph showing that in April and May of 2020, fewer than 1 million Americans traveled internationally

A chart showing that most Americans have been out of the country at least once

Whether before or during the pandemic, international travel is something a 71% majority of U.S. adults have done at some point in their lives, according to a June Pew Research Center survey. By contrast, around a quarter (27%) have not traveled abroad.

Still, the degree to which Americans have traveled around the globe varies widely: 19% have been to only one foreign country, 12% to two countries, 15% to three or four countries, and 14% to five to nine countries. Only 11% of Americans have been to 10 or more countries.

Who travels – and how much – also differs substantially across demographic groups. Income plays a decided role: Almost half (48%) of those earning less than $30,000 a year have not left the country, compared with 28% of those who earn between $30,000 and $79,999 a year and 10% of those earning $80,000 or more. These highest earners are also significantly more likely to have visited multiple countries.

A bar chart showing that college graduates are more likely to visit multiple countries

Americans with lower levels of education are much less likely to have traveled widely than those with more schooling. For example, 37% of those with just some college education or less have not left the country, compared with only 7% of those who have graduated college. College graduates are also more likely to have been to multiple countries: A quarter have been to 10 or more countries. 

Women (32%) are more likely than men (22%) to have never traveled outside the country. Men, for their part, are much more likely than women to have been to five or more countries (30% vs. 22%). Still, men and women are equally likely to have been to only one country. 

Black Americans are much less likely to have ever traveled abroad (49%) than White (75%) or Hispanic Americans (73%). White adults are also more likely to have been to five or more countries (30%) than Black (13%) or Hispanic (15%) adults.

When it comes to party affiliation, there are no significant differences in the share of Republicans and Democrats who have traveled internationally or in the number of countries they have visited.

A bar chart showing that Americans with interest in foreign affairs are more likely to have traveled to multiple countries

The 64% of Americans who say they are at least somewhat interested in keeping up to date on foreign affairs or foreign policy are much more likely to have traveled abroad at some point in their lives than those who say they have limited or no interest. They are also more likely to have been to many countries. For example, 32% of those who are interested in foreign affairs or foreign policy have been to at least five foreign countries, compared with 14% who are less focused on keeping up to date on foreign affairs.

(PEW)

AUGUST 12, 2021

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/08/12/most-americans-have-traveled-abroad-although-differences-among-demographic-groups-are-large/

 

703-704-43-26/Polls

Among U.S. Adults Overall, 53% Say Increased Attention To That History Is A Good Thing For Society

A little more than a year after nationwide protests erupted after George Floyd’s murder at the hands of the Minneapolis police, the public is deeply divided over how far the nation has progressed in addressing racial inequality – and how much further it needs to go.

Chart shows wide racial, partisan gaps on whether more attention to the history of racism in the U.S. is good for society

Opinion on the current national reckoning over the history of slavery and racism in the United States casts these divisions into stark relief: Among U.S. adults overall, 53% say increased attention to that history is a good thing for society, while 26% say it is a bad thing and another 21% say it is neither good nor bad.

Among Black adults, 75% say heightened public attention to this topic is a good thing, with 54% saying it is “very good” for society. Majorities of Asian American (64%) and Hispanic (59%) adults also view this positively, though much smaller shares say it is a very good thing, compared with Black adults. Among White adults, however, fewer than half (46%) say greater attention to the history of slavery and racism in the U.S. is good for society, with just 24% saying it is very good – about a third (32%) say it is bad.

The partisan divide in these opinions is even wider: Just 25% of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents say greater attention to the history of slavery and racism is a good thing; far more (46%) view it negatively, while 29% see it as neither good nor bad. Democrats and Democratic leaners – across racial and ethnic groups – express overwhelmingly positive views of increased attention to the topic (78% say it is good for society).

Chart shows those who say ‘a lot’ more is needed to ensure racial equality are split over what needs to be done to make changes

The latest national survey by Pew Research Center, conducted July 8-18 among 10,221 adults, finds sizable differences between parties – as well as differences within parties – over how to ensure equal rights for all Americans, regardless of their racial or ethnic backgrounds.

Half of all adults say “a lot” more needs to be done to ensure equal rights for all Americans regardless of their race or ethnicity, while about as many say either that a little (34%) or nothing at all (15%) needs to be done.

The half of Americans who say a lot more needs to be done to ensure equal rights are split over how this can be achieved. About a quarter of the public (24%) says that while there are many inequities in U.S. laws and institutions, necessary changes can be made by working within the current systems, while roughly as many (25%) say that most laws and major institutions need to be completely rebuilt because they are fundamentally biased against some racial and ethnic groups.

Nearly eight-in-ten Black adults say a lot more needs to be done to ensure equal rights for Americans of all racial and ethnic backgrounds. This includes 58% who say that in order to achieve this goal, most of the nation’s laws and major institutions need to be completely rebuilt because they are fundamentally biased and 19% who say needed changes can be made by working in the current systems.

Smaller majorities of Hispanic (59%) and Asian American (56%) adults say a lot more needs to be done to achieve racial equality; just 30% of Hispanics and 24% of Asian Americans say laws and institutions are fundamentally biased and need to be completely rebuilt.

Chart shows majority of Black Americans say most U.S. institutions and laws need to be completely rebuilt because they are fundamentally biased against some groups

Among White adults, 42% say a lot more needs to be done to ensure racial equality: 18% say most laws and institutions need to be completely rebuilt, while 24% say necessary changes can be made within the current systems.

Republicans overwhelmingly think only a little (47%) or nothing (30%) needs to be done to ensure equal rights for all Americans, regardless of their racial or ethnic backgrounds. Just 22% say a lot more needs to be done, with only 7% saying that most major institutions need to be rebuilt because they are fundamentally biased.

Democrats, by contrast, generally agree that a lot more needs to be done to achieve racial equality (74% say this). Yet Democrats are divided over whether this will require rebuilding most laws and institutions (40%) or can be achieved working through existing systems (33%).

Many of the partisan and racial differences on how much still needs to be done to address racial inequities in this country stem from divergent opinions on how much has been achieved: Republicans are much more likely than Democrats to say the nation has made a lot of progress toward racial equality over the past half-century.

About seven-in-ten Republicans (71%) say the U.S. has made a lot of progress over the last 50 years in ensuring equal rights for all Americans, regardless of their racial or ethnic backgrounds, while just 29% of Democrats say this. A 61% majority of Democrats say a little progress has been made to ensure equality among Americans of all racial and ethnic backgrounds.

Chart shows Republicans more likely than Democrats to see a lot of progress on race in the last 50 years; Democrats more likely to say a lot more needs to be done

These views are almost the reverse of opinions about whether more needs to be done to bring about racial equality; more than three times as many Democrats (74%) as Republicans (22%) say a lot more needs to be done.

Black adults are broadly skeptical about the progress the U.S. has made on this issue over the past 50 years. Only 19% say the country has made a lot of progress, while 64% say it has made a little and 16% say the country has made no progress at all. A majority of White adults (56%) say the U.S. has made a lot of progress on racial equality in this period, as do smaller shares of Asian American (44%) and Hispanic adults (38%).

Chart shows since 2016, rise in share of Democrats who say White people benefit from advantages that Black people lack

The survey finds little change in the past year in opinions about whether White people benefit from advantages that Black people do not have. But there has been an increase since 2016, especially among Democrats, in the share saying White people benefit a great deal because of their race.

Overall, 31% of the public says White people benefit a great deal from societal advantages that Black people do not have; 27% say they benefit a fair amount, while 40% think White people derive little or no benefit from advantages that Black people lack.

A 53% majority of Democrats say White people benefit from advantages in society that Black people do not have. While that is little changed in the past year, the share of Democrats expressing this view has increased 15 percentage points since 2016 (from 38% to 53%).

There has been very little change in Republicans’ views over the past five years: Just 6% of Republicans now say White people benefit from advantages that Black people do not have. Nearly three-quarters of Republicans (73%) say White people get little benefit (39%) or no benefit at all (34%) from advantages that Black people do not have.

Public sees progress ensuring equal rights for all Americans regardless of racial or ethnic background – also says more needs to be done

Chart shows about half of U.S. adults say the country has made ‘a lot’ of progress toward racial equality and a similar share says a lot more needs to be done

Reflecting back over the last 50 years, more than nine-in-ten Americans say the country has made progress toward “ensuring equal rights for all Americans regardless of their racial or ethnic backgrounds” – about half of the public (48%) says a lot of progress has been made, while nearly as many (45%) say a little progress has been made. Only 7% say the country has not made any progress toward racial equality.

However, while many Americans say the country has made at least some progress toward racial equality, many say there is more to be done: 50% say a lot more needs to be done, while another 34% say a little more needs to be done. But 15% say nothing at all still needs to be done.

There are wide differences in how Americans view the country’s progress toward racial and ethnic equality across demographic groups.

For example, adults ages 50 and older (52%) are more likely than younger adults (43%) to say the country has achieved a lot of progress toward ensuring equality for all Americans. And adults under the age of 50 are slightly more likely than older adults to say there is a lot more progress needed (53% vs. 47%).

Black adults, in particular, stand out for their views on progress on racial equality in the country. Just 19% of Black adults say the country has made a lot of progress toward ensuring equality for all Americans regardless of racial or ethnic backgrounds over the last 50 years, compared with much larger shares of White (56%), Asian American (44%), and Hispanic adults (38%). Nearly two-thirds of Black adults (64%) say the country has only made a little progress toward racial equality.

Black adults also are the most likely to say that a lot more needs to be done to ensure equality for all Americans: Nearly eight-in-ten Black adults (78%) hold this view. Smaller shares of Hispanic (59%) and Asian adults (56%) say a lot more needs to be done to achieve equality for all Americans. And while 42% of White adults say the country has a lot more to do to achieve racial equality, 38% say only a little more needs to be done. About two-in-ten White adults (19%) say the country does not need to do more to ensure equality for all Americans regardless of racial or ethnic background – much higher than any other racial or ethnic group.

Republicans and Republican leaners (71%) are far more likely than Democrats and Democratic leaners (29%) to say the country has made a lot of progress toward racial equality over the last 50 years. About six-in-ten Democrats (61%) say the country has made a little progress over the last half-century toward ensuring equality for all Americans regardless of racial or ethnic backgrounds.

In contrast, while about three-quarters of Democrats (74%) say there is a lot that needs to be done to achieve racial equity, just 22% of Republicans hold this view. About half of Republicans (47%) say a little more needs to be done to ensure racial equality and 30% say nothing more at all needs to be done.

Chart shows those who say a lot of progress has been made on racial equality are least likely to say a lot more needs to be done

Those who say the country has only made a little progress in ensuring equal rights for all Americans are more likely than others to say a lot more needs to be done to continue the progress.

Overall, 70% of adults who say the country, over the last 5o years, has made a little progress toward racial equality say a lot more still needs to be done to ensure equal rights for all Americans. A much smaller share of adults who say the country has made a lot of progress in the past (31%) say the same. Six-in-ten adults who say there has been no progress toward racial equity in the country say there is a lot more that needs to be done to ensure this equality.

And while this pattern occurs among both Republicans and Democrats, large partisan gaps are evident in the shares who say a lot more still needs to be done to achieve racial equality. About eight-in-ten Democrats who say a little has been done in the last half-century (81%) also say a lot more needs to be done, as do 62% of Democrats who say a lot has been done and 70% of Democrats who say no progress has been made. By comparison, the opinion that a lot more needs to be done to ensure equal rights for all Americans is held by 39% of Republicans who say little progress has been made in the last five decades and an even smaller share (15%) of Republicans who say a lot of progress has been made.

Americans who say a lot has to be done to ensure equal rights for all split over whether many laws and institutions need to be ‘completely rebuilt’

While half of Americans say that a lot needs to be done to ensure equal rights for all Americans, those who express this view are divided over what needs to be done.

Chart shows a majority of Black adults say most U.S. laws and institutions need to be rebuilt to ensure racial equality

A quarter of Americans say that to ensure equal rights for all Americans, “most U.S. laws and major institutions need to be completely rebuilt because they are fundamentally biased against some racial and ethnic groups.” A nearly identical share (24%) says “while there are many inequities in U.S. laws and institutions, the necessary changes can be made by working within the current systems.”

Overall, nearly six-in-ten Black adults (58%) say that in order to ensure equality for all Americans regardless of their racial or ethnic backgrounds, most major U.S. institutions need to be completely rebuilt because they are fundamentally biased against some racial and ethnic groups, while just 19% say necessary changes to address inequities can be made within the current systems; about two-in-ten say little or nothing at all needs to be done. Among other racial and ethnic groups, smaller shares overall say a lot more needs to be done; those who do are roughly evenly split between those who say changes can be made within current systems and those who think most institutions need to be completely rebuilt because they are fundamentally biased. As a result, Black adults (58%) are significantly more likely than Hispanic (30%), Asian American (24%) and White (18%) adults to say most institutions and laws need to be completely rebuilt.

There also are substantial age differences in these views: Younger adults are not only more likely than older adults to say a lot more needs to be done to ensure racial equality, but those who do are also more likely than their older counterparts to say most U.S. major institutions need to be rebuilt to ensure racial equality. Nearly four-in-ten adults ages 18 to 29 (37%) say this, compared with 21% of those 50 to 64 and 16% of adults 65 and older.

About three-quarters of Democrats say a lot needs to be done to ensure equality for all Americans, including 40% who say that achieving this requires rebuilding most major institutions and 33% who say changes can be made by working within current systems. Among Democrats, there are ideological differences in these views: About half of liberal Democrats (47%) say most laws and institutions need to be completely rebuilt to address fundamental biases against some racial and ethnic groups; 35% of conservative and moderate Democrats say this (a third of each group says necessary changes can be made within the system).

Only about two-in-ten Republicans (22%) say there is a lot more that needs to be done to ensure equal rights for all racial and ethnic groups, with 14% saying that necessary changes can be made from within the system and just 7% saying that institutions need to be rebuilt in order to ensure equality for all Americans.

Across racial and ethnic groups, younger adults are more likely than those who are older to say the best way to ensure equality for all Americans is to rebuild most major U.S. laws and institutions. Still, both Black adults under 50 (64%) and those ages 50 and older (52%) are more likely than those in other racial or ethnic groups to say that in order to ensure equal rights for all Americans, most institutions need to be rebuilt.

White and Hispanic Democrats are more likely than their Republican counterparts to say a lot more needs to be done to ensure equality for all Americans. And this pattern holds among partisans when looking at shares who say the way to ensure equality for all Americans requires rebuilding most U.S. laws and institutions.

Chart shows Black Democrats more likely than White, Hispanic and Asian Democrats to say most U.S. laws and major institutions need to be completely rebuilt to ensure equality for Americans of all racial and ethnic backgrounds

Among Democrats, however, there are differences by race and ethnicity on whether necessary changes to ensure racial equity can come from within current systems or require fundamental changes: Black Democrats (61%) are far more likely than Hispanic (39%), White (34%) and Asian Democrats (31%) to say that major institutions in the country need to be completely rebuilt in order to ensure equal rights for all Americans. Four-in-ten White Democrats say that although there are inequities within U.S. laws and institutions, it is possible for necessary changes to be made by working within current systems, while equal shares of Hispanic and Asian Democrats (32% each) say the same. Two-in-ten Black Democrats hold the view that racial inequities can be addressed by working within current systems.

Narrow majority of the public says increased attention to history of slavery and racism is good for society

Chart shows Democrats view increased attention to U.S. history of racism positively; Republicans are far more skeptical

As the country continues to grapple with the issue of race, about half of American adults (53%) say that the “increased public attention to the history of slavery and racism” is good for society, including 30% who say it is very good for society. About a quarter of adults say this increased attention is somewhat bad (14%) or very bad for society (11%). Another 21% say it is neither good nor bad.

Views on whether the public’s increased attention to the history of slavery and racism is good or bad for society are divided by age and education, as well as by race and political affiliation.

Black adults are most likely to say that increased public attention to the history of racism is good for society. Three-quarters of Black adults say this increased attention is good, including more than half (54%) who say it is very good for society. Smaller majorities of Hispanic (59%) and Asian adults (64%) also say greater attention to the history of racism is good for society. Among White adults, 46% express this view; about a third of White adults (32%) view this as a bad thing, while 22% say it is neither good nor bad.

Younger adults hold a more positive view on the public’s increased interest in America’s racial issues than do older people: Two-thirds of adults ages 18 to 29 view the public’s increased attention to the history of slavery and racism as a good thing for society, compared with about half of adults over the age of 30.

Those with higher education are more likely to say the public’s increased attention on racial issues is good for society than those with less formal education. For example, 61% of adults with a college degree or more education say this is good for society, compared with about half of those without a college degree (49%). This pattern is evident among both White and Black adults; Hispanic adults with a four-year college degree are about as likely as those who do not have a degree to view the increased attention to the history of slavery and racism as a good thing for society.

While partisanship is a major factor in these opinions, both parties are divided ideologically in views of the impact of increased public attention to the history of slavery and racism. While large shares of both liberal Democrats and conservative and moderate Democrats view the increased attention as good for society, liberal Democrats are far more likely to say it is very good (64% vs. 37%). Among Republicans, 35% of moderates and liberals express positive views of the impact of increased attention to racism, compared with just 19% of conservative Republicans.

Chart shows Republicans’ views of increased public attention to the history of racism differ by age and ethnicity

There also are demographic differences in these opinions within partisan groups, especially among Republicans.

Hispanic Republicans are about twice as likely as White Republicans to say the increased public attention to historical racial issues is good for society (42% vs. 21%).

And while 42% of Republicans under age 30 say the increased attention to America’s racial history is good for society, only about quarter of older Republicans say the same. About half of Republicans ages 50 and older (52%) say this increased interest is bad for society, with 24% saying it is very bad for society.

By contrast, Democrats and Democratic leaners across age and racial and ethnic groups are largely united in their views that the increased public attention to the history of slavery and racism is a good thing for society.

Black adults overwhelmingly say White people benefit from advantages because of their race; White adults are divided

About six-in-ten adults say that White people benefit a great deal (31%) or a fair amount (27%) from advantages in society that Black people do not have. About a quarter say that White people benefit not too much and another 17% say White people do not benefit at all from advantages in society that Black people do not have.

Chart shows large majority of Black adults say White people benefit ‘a great deal’ from societal advantages that Black people do not have

Black adults, in particular, stand out for the view that White people benefit from societal advantages: About nine-in-ten Black adults say White people benefit at least a fair amount, including 71% who say they benefit a great deal.

And while smaller majorities of Hispanic (70%) and Asian adults (73%) say White people have advantages over Black people, White adults are divided: 47% say White people benefit at least a fair amount from advantages that Black people do not have, compared with 52% who say they do not benefit much or at all from any advantages.

Nearly three-quarters of Republicans (73%) say that White people do not benefit much or at all from advantages in society that Black people do not have, while 26% say that White people benefit at least a fair amount from advantages. However, among Republicans, views on whether these advantages exist differ by ethnicity.

While a large majority of White Republicans (78%) say that White people do not benefit much or at all from advantages Black people do not have, views among Hispanic Republicans are more divided: 46% say White people benefit at least a fair amount, while 53% say that White people do not benefit much or at all from advantages Black people do not have.

Sizable majorities of Democrats in all racial and ethnic groups say that White people benefit at least a fair amount from advantages that Black people do not, but there are differences over whether White people benefit a great deal from these advantages. About three-quarters of Black Democrats say White people benefit a great deal from advantages in society that Black people do not have, compared with smaller shares of Asian (54%), Hispanic (52%) and White Democrats (45%).

The public’s views on whether White people benefit from advantages Black people do not possess have changed only modestly since 2016. Yet Democrats increasingly say White people benefit a great deal from these advantages, while Republicans’ views are largely unchanged.

Chart shows Democrats increasingly say White people benefit ‘a great deal’ from advantages that Black people do not have; little change in Republicans’ opinions

Currently, 53% of Democrats say that White people benefit a great deal from societal advantages Black people do not have, up from 38% in 2016. Over the past year, however, there has been little change in Democrats’ views.

The shares of Democrats who say White people have a great deal of advantages over Black people have increased among all racial and ethnic sub-groups since 2016. About three-quarters of Black Democrats (76%) say White people benefit a great deal from these advantages today, compared with 68% who said this in 2016. The share of White Democrats who hold this view has also risen sharply – from 26% in 2016 to 45% today.

Views among Republicans have largely remained unchanged over the last five years. A sizable majority of Republicans (73%) continue to say White people benefit only a little or not at all from advantages that Black people lack.

(PEW)

AUGUST 12, 2021

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/politics/2021/08/12/deep-divisions-in-americans-views-of-nations-racial-history-and-how-to-address-it/

 

703-704-43-27/Polls

Nearly Half 49% Of U.S. Adults Have Tried Marijuana

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The percentage of U.S. adults who say they have tried marijuana has ticked up to 49%, the highest Gallup has measured to date. More than 50 years ago, just 4% said they had tried the drug, but that percentage surpassed 20% in 1977, 30% in 1985 and 40% in 2015.

A much smaller proportion of U.S. adults, 12%, say they "smoke marijuana." The percentage of current marijuana smokers has been steady in recent years, varying between 11% and 13% after increasing from the 7% Gallup initially measured in 2013.

Tried

Line graph. Trends in marijuana usage among U.S. adults. In 1969, 4% of U.S. adults told Gallup they had ever tried marijuana. The percentage increased to 11% in 1972, 24% in 1977, 33% in 1985, and has been 44% or higher since 2015, including 49% this year. Gallup first asked Americans whether they smoke marijuana in 2013. 7% said they did. The percentage has been between 11% and 13% since then.

The results are based on Gallup's annual Consumption Habits poll, conducted July 6-21.

Generational patterns explain the increase in marijuana experimentation over the last five decades. The oldest Americans living today, those born before 1945 whom Gallup calls "traditionalists," are much less likely than those in other birth cohorts to have tried marijuana, with just 19% saying they have done so. That compares with about half of millennials (51%), Generation Xers (49%) and baby boomers (50%).

These generational figures are based on combined data from the 2015-2021 Consumption Habits surveys. Gallup does not yet have sufficient data to provide reliable estimates for Generation Z, the oldest of whom are 24 years old now.

Comparing the most recent generational figures with data from the 1980s and 1990s finds little change in the rate of marijuana experimentation among baby boomers and Gen X. Combined data from the 1985 and 1999 Gallup polls shows that 44% of members of Gen X and 50% of baby boomers had tried marijuana as of then.

During those years, a lower proportion of traditionalists than today had tried marijuana (10%). The increase in that group today compared with the 1980s and 1990s probably reflects the dying off of many of the oldest members of that generation, who were much less likely than younger traditionalists to have tried marijuana.

Percentages of Americans in Each Generation Who Have Tried Marijuana, Over Time

Keeping in mind that all of your answers in this survey are confidential, have you, yourself, ever happened to try marijuana?

1985-1999

2015-2021

%

%

All U.S. adults

34

45

Millennials (born 1981-1996)

n/a

51

Gen X (born 1965-1990)

44

49

Baby boomers (born 1946-1964)

50

50

Traditionalists (born before 1946)

10

19

Gallup did not have sufficient data on millennials in 1985-1999 as the oldest members of that generation did not turn 18 until 1998. Gallup does not have sufficient data to provide reliable estimates for the portion of Generation Z (born after 1996) that has reached adulthood.

GALLUP

Thus, with little change in generational rates of marijuana experimentation over time, the increase in the proportion of U.S. adults who have tried marijuana mainly reflects millennials replacing older traditionalists in the U.S. adult population.

Younger Americans Most Likely to Smoke Marijuana

While Americans born during the Baby Boom era or later differ little in whether they have tried marijuana, younger Americans are more likely than older Americans to say they currently smoke marijuana. The combined 2015-2021 data shows that 20% of millennials smoke marijuana, compared with 11% of Gen Xers, 9% of baby boomers and 1% of traditionalists. These age differences, which have been consistent in Gallup's polling, indicate that, at least historically, people tend to try marijuana at a younger age but as they get older, most no longer continue smoking it.

In addition to the age differences in current marijuana smoking, Gallup has also found differences by gender, religiosity, political orientation and education:

  • Sixteen percent of men, versus 9% of women, smoke marijuana.
  • Just 3% of Americans who attend religious services weekly, and 6% who attend monthly, say they smoke marijuana. In contrast, 19% who seldom or never attend religious services do.
  • Twenty-two percent of political liberals and 15% of Democrats regularly use marijuana, compared with 6% of conservatives and 7% of Republicans.
  • The rate of marijuana consumption is 5% among those with a postgraduate education, compared with 14% of those with a four-year college degree or less.

Bottom Line

The percentage of Americans who have tried marijuana has steadily climbed in recent decades. Soon it should reach 50%, but it may not get much higher than that given the rates of experimentation have been steady around 50% in Gen Xers and among baby boomers. Half of millennials have also tried marijuana, and with many in that group approaching middle age, that proportion seems unlikely to increase in future years.

As such, Gen Z's incidence of trying marijuana will likely determine the trajectory of the trendline. If Gen Z experimentation rates are similar to their predecessors', the percentage may soon level off. It could, however, continue to grow if Gen Z and succeeding generations try marijuana at rates above 50%.

Gallup has a shorter trend line on current marijuana smoking. That percentage has been steady near 12% in recent years. Still, nearly as many Americans today say they smoke marijuana as say they smoke cigarettes, given the long-term decline in cigarette smoking.

(Gallup)

AUGUST 17, 2021

Source: https://news.gallup.com/poll/353645/nearly-half-adults-tried-marijuana.aspx

 

703-704-43-28/Polls

Roughly Half Of U S Adults (48%) Now Say The Government Should Take Steps To Restrict False Information

Amid rising concerns over misinformation online – including surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic, especially vaccines – Americans are now a bit more open to the idea of the U.S. government taking steps to restrict false information online. And a majority of the public continues to favor technology companies taking such action, according to a new Pew Research Center survey.

A bar chart showing that Americans are now split over whether government should take steps to restrict false information online; majority continue to say tech companies should do so

Roughly half of U.S. adults (48%) now say the government should take steps to restrict false information, even if it means losing some freedom to access and publish content, according to the survey of 11,178 adults conducted July 26-Aug. 8, 2021. That is up from 39% in 2018. At the same time, the share of adults who say freedom of information should be protected – even if it means some misinformation is published online – has decreased from 58% to 50%.

When it comes to whether technology companies should take steps to address misinformation online, more are in agreement. A majority of adults (59%) continue to say technology companies should take steps to restrict misinformation online, even if it puts some restrictions on Americans’ ability to access and publish content. Around four-in-ten (39%) take the opposite view that protecting freedom of information should take precedence, even if it means false claims can spread. The balance of opinion on this question has changed little since 2018.

A chart showing that partisan divisions have widened over role of government, tech firms in restricting misinformation

Partisan divisions on the role of government in addressing online misinformation have emerged since 2018. Three years ago, around six-in-ten in each partisan coalition – 60% of Republicans and GOP-leaning independents and 57% of Democrats and Democratic leaners – agreed that freedom of information should be prioritized over the government taking steps to restrict false information online. Today, 70% of Republicans say those freedoms should be protected, even it if means some false information is published. Nearly as many Democrats (65%) instead say the government should take steps to restrict false information, even if it means limiting freedom of information.

Partisan views on whether technology companies should take such steps have also grown further apart. Roughly three-quarters of Democrats (76%) now say tech companies should take steps to restrict false information online, even at the risk of limiting information freedoms. A majority of Republicans (61%) express the opposite view – that those freedoms should be protected, even if it means false information can be published online. In 2018, the parties were closer together on this question, though most Democrats still supported action by tech firms.

Some demographic differences that existed on these questions in 2018 have now largely disappeared. Three years ago, older Americans and those with less education were more likely than younger and more educated adults, respectively, to say the U.S. government should take steps to restrict false information online, even if means limiting some freedoms. Now, Americans across nearly all age groups are fairly evenly divided between the two views. Similar changes have occurred when it comes to Americans’ educational background.

Women still tend to be more open than men to the idea of both the government and tech companies taking action to restrict false information online, though both groups have become a bit more supportive of the government taking such steps.

A chart showing that majorities within each demographic group now say tech companies should restrict false information

(PEW)

AUGUST 18, 2021

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/08/18/more-americans-now-say-government-should-take-steps-to-restrict-false-information-online-than-in-2018/

 

703-704-43-29/Polls

Roughly Seven-In-Ten Rural Americans (72%) Say They Have A Broadband Internet Connection At Home

Rural Americans have made large gains in adopting digital technology over the past decade and have narrowed some digital gaps. However, rural adults remain less likely than suburban adults to have home broadband and less likely than urban adults to own a smartphone, tablet computer or traditional computer.

Roughly seven-in-ten rural Americans (72%) say they have a broadband internet connection at home, according to a Pew Research Center survey of U.S. adults conducted from Jan. 25 to Feb. 8, 2021. While broadband adoption has not significantly increased for urban and suburban Americans in the last five years, rural residents have seen a 9 percentage point rise in home broadband adoption since 2016, when about six-in-ten (63%) reported having a high-speed internet connection at home. Despite the rise in rural adoption, rural residents are still less likely than those living in suburban areas to report having home broadband.

As is true for the nation as a whole, mobile technology use among rural adults has also risen rapidly, with the share of those owning smartphones and tablets increasing sharply since 2011. While smartphone ownership rose significantly (9 points) among rural residents in the past three years, their tablet ownership has remained relatively equivalent to what it was in 2019. Similarly, rural ownership of desktop or laptop computers remains largely unchanged.

https://www.pewresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/FT_21.06.04_RuralBroadband.png?w=640

When looking at differences by community type in technology ownership, rural adults are less likely than urban adults to own traditional or tablet computers. In addition, rural residents are less likely than suburbanites to say they have a tablet.

Rural adults are also less likely than suburban and urban adults to have multiple devices or services that enable them to go online: Three-in-ten adults who live in rural communities report owning or having a desktop or laptop computer, a smartphone, a home broadband connection and a tablet computer, compared with 44% of urban and 43% of suburban adults.

Rural residents go online less frequently than their urban counterparts. Eight-in-ten adults who live in rural communities say they use the internet on at least a daily basis, compared with roughly nine-in-ten of those in urban areas (88%). In addition, three-in-ten or more urban (37%) and suburban (30%) residents say they are online almost constantly while about a quarter of rural residents (23%) say the same.

In a 2018 Center survey, adults who lived in rural areas were more likely to say access to high-speed internet was a major problem in their local community: 24% said this, compared with 13% of urban adults and 9% of rural adults. Similar rates of concern about access to high-speed internet were shared by rural adults in both lower- and higher-income households, as well as by those with various levels of educational attainment.

These comparably lower levels of adoption among rural residents may be due to a unique feature of rural life. Even though rural areas are more wired today than in the past, current infrastructure does not support consistently dependable broadband access in many rural areas. This lack of reliable high-speed internet access has come to the forefront of discussions about navigating remote work and school during the coronavirus pandemic.

Although rural residents are less likely to be broadband users than are suburban residents, only 29% of rural adults say the government has a responsibility to ensure that all Americans have a high-speed internet connection at home during the coronavirus outbreak. In comparison, 50% of urban residents and 35% of suburbanites say the same, according to previously unexplored data from an April 2020 Pew Research Center survey.

(PEW)

AUGUST 19, 2021

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/08/19/some-digital-divides-persist-between-rural-urban-and-suburban-america/

 

703-704-43-30/Polls

Out Of The Starting Blocks - More Of The Same: Liberals 36%, Conservatives 31%, NDP 20%, Bloc 6%, Green 5%

Toronto, ON, Aug 17, 2021 — Despite the Prime Minister calling an election that a majority (56%) of Canadians believe should not be held during a pandemic, a new Ipsos poll conducted on behalf of Global News has shown that nothing has changed substantially with party standings even with the official start of the campaign.

If the election were held tomorrow, the results would be very similar to the results of Ipsos’ polling last month: the Liberals under Justin Trudeau would receive 36% of the decided popular vote nationally (unchanged since last month), while Erin O’Toole and the Conservatives would receive 31%, up 1 point. Jagmeet Singh’s NDP would receive 20% of the popular vote, unchanged, while Annamie Paul and the Green Party would receive the support of 5% of Canadians, up 2 points. The Bloc, led by Yves-Francois Blanchet, would receive 6% of the vote nationally (down 1 point), or 28% in Quebec. Just 1% would vote for Maxime Bernier and the People’s Party (down 1 point), and 1% would vote for some other party (down 1 point). Nearly two in ten (17%) Canadians either remain undecided (13%) or would not vote in this election (4%), suggesting that the election is still far from over.

While match point remains elusive for the Liberals, they hold the advantage in some of Canada’s most seat-rich provinces:

  • In Ontario, the Liberals (40%) hold a lead over the Conservatives (31%), but not enough to earn them the number of seats they need to flirt with a majority government. The NDP (23%), Greens (3%) and others (3%) are further back.
  • In Quebec, the Liberals (39%) have a double-digit lead over the Bloc (28%), while the Conservatives (17%), NDP (12%), and Greens (4%) trail.
  • In British Columbia, the race is tighter with the Liberals (37%) having only a modest lead over the Tories (32%). The NDP is in third (20%), while the Greens (10%) and others (1%) are behind.
  • In Alberta, the Tories (53%) have regained their more traditional advantage over the Liberals (19%), NDP (20%), Greens (5%) and others (3%).
  • In Saskatchewan and Manitoba, the Conservatives (46%) also have a strong lead over the tied Liberals (23%) and NDP (24%), while the Greens (6%) and others (1%) trail.
  • In Atlantic Canada, the Liberals (49%) maintain a healthy lead over the Conservatives (21%), NDP (18%), Greens (9%) and others (3%).

These vote figures within the regions would likely fail to produce a meaningful difference to the distribution of seats that presently comprises the House of Commons, suggesting that another minority government remains the likely outcome of this election.

The data also reveal that there are some key differences in voting intentions by gender, and by age:

  • Among men, the Liberals (36%) and Conservatives (34%) are roughly tied, while the NDP (16%), Green (6%) and Bloc (5%) are behind.
  • Among women, the Liberals (37%) enjoy a strong lead over the Tories (28%), NDP (23%), Bloc (7%) and Greens (4%).
  • Among those aged 55+, the Liberals (39%) and Conservatives (38%) are tied, with the NDP (13%), Greens (5%) and Bloc (3%) struggling.
  • Among those aged 35-54, the Liberals (37%) also have a strong lead over the Conservatives (28%) and NDP (21%), with the Bloc (8%) and Greens (5%) further behind.
  • Among those aged 18-34, the Liberals (32%) and NDP (28%) are fighting for top spot, with the Conservatives (24%) not far behind. The Bloc (9%) and Greens (5%) are trailing.

Underlying assessments of the Trudeau government remain lukewarm. Overall, 51% approve of the performance of the Liberal government under Justin Trudeau (up 1 point), but this assessment is tepid at best with only 11% saying they strongly approve while 39% somewhat approve. In contrast, 49% disapprove (28% strongly/21% somewhat)

Moreover, 41% believe the Trudeau government has done a good job and deserves re-election (down 1 point), a figure which sits 5 points above the Liberal vote intention. It seems that many Canadians would give Trudeau a thumbs up for his performance as Prime Minister but are still willing to entertain the possibility of change, with 57% saying it’s time for another party to take over.

The quest for a majority is made more difficult by the fact that Canadians are split down the middle as to whether things in Canada are headed in the right direction (48%) or are headed off on the wrong track (50%). The Prime Minister will need to convince Canadians that a future under his continued leadership is better than the alternatives, and that he can steer Canada in the right direction.

(Ipsos Canada)

17 August 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-ca/news-polls/Out-of-the-Starting-Blocks-More-of-the-Same

 

703-704-43-31/Polls

Strong Majority Of Canadians (Almost 80%) Support Vaccination Mandates; Open To Measures Including Vaccine Passports

Toronto, ON, Aug 19th, 2021 — The 44th Canadian Federal Election is already being dubbed “the pandemic election”, and we are barely into the first week of the campaign period. Is it any wonder then that subjects related to COVID-19 are top of mind for Canadians?

According to a recent Ipsos poll, in light of the recent mandate that vaccination will be mandatory for air and train travel as well as for public servants, Canadians show that not only do they agree with these measures, but they would support imposing a vaccine mandate for healthcare workers and teachers as well. A strong majority agree with the recently announced mandatory vaccination for federal public servants (80%) and the requirement for proof of vaccination for flying on an airplane or taking a train international or inter-provincially (82%). Similar proportions support mandatory vaccination for healthcare workers (84%), for teachers (81%), or vaccine passports to enter restaurants, gyms, or other indoor spaces (72%).

Support for these measures is expectedly strong among the Liberals and NDP. More surprisingly, despite Erin O’Toole campaigning against mandatory vaccination it appears his base feels differently as a majority of Conservative voters supported all tested policies on mandatory vaccination or vaccine passports.

Support for Pandemic Measures, by Stated Vote Intention

 

Total

Cons.

Lib.

NDP

BQ

Green

Mandatory vaccination for

healthcare workers

84%

79%

94%

85%

81%

84%

Proof of vaccination for flying on an airplane or taking a train

(internationally or inter-provincially)

82%

78%

93%

84%

73%

81%

Mandatory vaccination for

Teachers

81%

74%

93%

82%

83%

80%

Mandatory vaccination for

federal public servants

80%

75%

92%

80%

83%

79%

Vaccine passports

(to enter restaurants, gyms, or other indoor spaces)

72%

67%

85%

75%

70%

79%

On the subject of vaccine mandates, support is high across the country, including the province of Quebec where it was recently announced by Premier Legault that vaccines would become mandatory for all healthcare workers. Ontario has also indicated that healthcare workers and teachers will be required to get the vaccine.

Support for Mandatory Vaccination for Healthcare Workers, by Region

 

Total

BC

AB

SK/MB

ON

QC

ATL

Mandatory vaccination for

healthcare workers

84%

85%

80%

80%

86%

78%

90%

Mandatory vaccination for

Teachers

81%

83%

77%

79%

85%

75%

87%

 

Canadians Place Liberals as the Party with the Best Plan for Canada Post-COVID

If this election isn’t a referendum on Justin Trudeau’s handling of the pandemic, then it could be considered a referendum on the options for a post-COVID Canada. A majority of Canadians (58%) approve of the Prime Minster’s performance handling the COVID crisis, up 4 points since May and now on par with the provincial premiers as a whole, but below local mayors (58% approve of the job their premier did, down 1 point since May; 72% approve of their local mayor’s handling, up 3 points).

Looking ahead, Canadians appear to think the Liberals would be best placed to handle the pandemic moving forward: 32% state that the Liberals have the best plan for the country’s post-COVID-19 future, with less than two in ten indicating the same for any other party (18% CPC, 12% NDP, 3% Bloc, 2% Green, 1% PPC). Three in ten (30%) say none has the best plan and that they’re all the same.

 

Healthcare and COVID-19 Pandemic Top Issues; Pandemic Increasingly Important

Taking a wider view of the issues that Canadians think are important, healthcare (31%) and the COVID-19 pandemic (26%) are named as the most important in driving how Canadians will vote, from among a list of thirty possible issues. The economy (25%), climate change (23%), and affordability/cost of living (23%) are not far behind.

The importance of most issues has remained stable from July, with the exception of the COVID-19 pandemic, whose importance has increased by 6 points in the span of just one month. This perhaps speaks to growing concern over the fourth wave of the pandemic, mask mandates in public spaces, mandatory vaccination and vaccine passports.

Top Issues
(mentioned in top three)

Issue

August

2021

July

2021

Healthcare

31%

31%

COVID-19 pandemic

26%

20%

The economy

25%

24%

Affordability and cost of living

23%

25%

Climate change

23%

24%

Taxes

18%

17%

Seniors' issues/aging population

15%

11%

Government deficits/debt

15%

12%

Housing (e.g., affordability, availability)

14%

15%

Poverty and social inequality

14%

14%

Education

10%

8%

Corruption and ethics in government

10%

12%

Note: Issues under 10% in August 2021 not shown. Please see tab 7 of the data tables for full listing.

In addition, what Canadians prioritize is certainly not the same across the country. While those living in Ontario and Quebec say that the COVID-19 pandemic is a #2 issue (behind healthcare), it has taken a back seat to other issues among Canadians living elsewhere.

Top Issues by Region

(mentioned in top three)

  • British Columbia: Healthcare (28%), economy (27%), affordability and cost of living (27%), COVID-19 pandemic (24%), climate change (23%)
  • Alberta: Economy (37%), healthcare (30%), affordability and cost of living (22%), COVID-19 pandemic (20%), government deficits/debt (18%)
  • Saskatchewan/Manitoba: Healthcare (36%), economy (24%), COVID-19 pandemic (22%), taxes (21%), affordability and cost of living (18%) and government debt/deficit (18%).
  • Ontario: Healthcare (28%), COVID-19 pandemic (28%), climate change (28%), affordability and cost of living (25%), economy (24%)
  • Quebec: Healthcare (34%), COVID-19 pandemic (28%), economy (22%), climate change (21%), education (20%)
  • Atlantic: Healthcare (46%), affordability and cost of living (27%), COVID-19 pandemic (26%), taxes (25%), climate change (23%)

Also of note from a regional perspective are issues that may not be as pressing as others, but nonetheless are key to understanding what citizens across the country have on their minds. More specifically:

  • Albertans are more likely than the rest of the country to say they are concerned about energy, including pipelines and gas prices (17%), as well as corruption and ethics in government (15%);
  • Those in Saskatchewan/Manitoba (15%) and Ontario (12%) are more likely to say that indigenous issues are a top issue for them personally;
  • Women’s issues are slightly more prominent in Saskatchewan/Manitoba (10%) than in the rest of the country;
  • Quebecers are more likely than those living elsewhere to say that education is a top issue (20%);
  • Atlantic Canadians have more of a tendency to say that unemployment/jobs are a top issue (20%)

Liberals Trusted on COVID-19 Pandemic, Healthcare; Conservatives Trusted on Economy

While healthcare, the COVID-19 pandemic, the economy, affordability/cost of living, and climate change are the top five issues that Canadians say will be the most influential in determining their vote in this coming election, exactly which parties they believe are best-suited to lead on these issues is a different matter.

For instance, among those who say that healthcare is a top issue for them personally, the Liberals are favoured (30%), with the Conservatives (21%) and NDP (20%) statistically tied for second place. The Liberals are also seen as the party most capable of handling the COVID-19 pandemic, among those who believe that the pandemic is a top issue. While this is likely due to the Liberals actually being in power during the pandemic and being able to concretely show their response, they nonetheless have a commanding lead (48%) over any other party. Among those who say that the economy top-of-mind for them, the Conservatives (41%) are seen as the party best suited to tackle the issue. Here, the Liberals trail by eight percentage points (33%). Finally, the NDP and Greens are seen as the party best suited to deal with affordability/cost of living and climate change respectively (among those who name those issues as being important). In short, the Liberals lead on issues one and two, while the other national parties own just one issue each from among the top five.

Party Best Suited to Deal with Top 5 Issues

(among those selecting issue in top 3)

Issue

Healthcare

COVID-19 pandemic

Economy

Affordability

Climate change

Conservative

21%

14%

41%

19%

6%

Liberal

30%

48%

33%

24%

30%

NDP

20%

12%

7%

27%

19%

BQ

6%

3%

2%

1%

1%

Green

2%

2%

1%

2%

32%

Other

1%

1%

1%

1%

<1%

None of them

20%

21%

15%

24%

12%

 

Approval of Handling the Economy Split Along Party Lines

With the handling of the economy set to be a major campaign issue, it is perhaps expected that Canadians are divided about how the economy has been handled through the pandemic. Half (53%) of Canadians approve of the current Federal Government’s overall management of the Canadian economy, while 47% disapprove.

This division largely falls along party lines with Liberal voters being significantly more likely to approve of how the federal government has handed the economy (93% vs. 52% NDP, 51% BQ, 46% Green, 18% CPC) while Conservative voters are more likely to state their disapproval (82% Conservative voters disapprove).

(Ipsos Canada)

19 August 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-ca/news-polls/majority-of-canadians-support-vaccination-mandates

 

703-704-43-32/Polls

Justin Trudeau Still Best to Lead Country, Say Canadians (39%), Ahead of O’Toole (25%) and Singh (23%)

Toronto, ON, August 20, 2021 — At the outset of a snap election called by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, new Ipsos polling done exclusively for Global News reveals the public’s views on who is best to lead, and what Canadians think about this election’s candidates to lead the country into a post-COVID future.

Trudeau Best Candidate for PM

Most Canadians (39%) feel that Justin Trudeau is the federal party leader best fit to be the Prime Minister of Canada. Around a quarter see Erin O’Toole (25%) and Jagmeet Singh (23%) as the best candidates, while Canadians expressed much lower levels of confidence in Yves-François Blanchet (4%, 18% in Quebec) and Annamie Paul (4%). Six percent said they did not know or refused to comment. Notably, based on current Ipsos polling data, Trudeau and Singh both poll ahead of overall vote intention for their parties (i.e., 36% of Canadians intend to vote for the Liberal party, and 39% say Trudeau is the best fit to be the Prime Minister), while O’Toole, Blanchet, ad Paul trail behind.

 

Vote Intention (Party)

Best Candidate for PM

Trudeau

36%

39%

O’Toole

31%

25%

Singh

20%

23%

Blanchet

6%

4%

Paul

5%

4%

Trudeau received consistent support across most regions in Canada, including Quebec (48%), Ontario (40%), BC (39%), and Atlantic Canada (38%). By contrast, those in the prairie provinces were far more skeptical of Trudeau’s leadership (AB 25%, SK/MB 23%), favouring O’Toole (44% of Albertans and 35% of those from Saskatchewan and Manitoba feel O’Toole would make the best Prime Minister). Singh is significantly more popular among urban voters (25%) compared to rural voters (11%), as well as younger voters (18-34 32%, 35-54 22%, 55+ 17%), while O’Toole was more likely to be selected as top pick among older voters (18-34 16%, 35-54 24%, 55+ 31%).

A Safe Bet in Uncertain Times

The prospect of a federal election at the outset of Canada’s fourth wave of the COVID-19 pandemic has likely left many Canadians feeling jaded; after the pandemic’s ravaging of the economy, the healthcare system, and national morale, 35% of Canadians feel that none of the federal party leaders up for election will make things more affordable, and 38% feel that none of the candidates will keep their election promises.

However, Trudeau emerges as the top leader who Canadians feel will best represent the country on the world stage (39%), can manage Canada during tough economic times (34%), and has the right temperament and maturity to be the Prime Minister (34%). Comparatively weak leadership among the Conservatives coupled with pandemic-related exhaustion may mean that Canadians are less likely to want to make significant changes to the status quo. In fact, across the candidates, Trudeau leads on all 16 positive traits. While O’Toole is the candidate with many of the second highest scores, he does not lead on any positive traits.

That said, 44% of Canadians feel Justin Trudeau will say anything to get elected, 36% feel he has a hidden agenda, and just 28% feel he is someone they can trust. Notably, just one quarter (24%) feel he will keep his election promises. While Canadians may not wish to make a major leadership change this election, they may also be wary of Trudeau’s motives for calling an election.

Comparing O’Toole and Singh, O’Toole is seen as the candidate with the best handle on taxpayer spending (21% feel he will do so wisely), managing during tough economic times (22%), and representing Canada on the world stage (20%), but Singh is seen as more sincere (22%) – 27% feel O’Toole will say anything to get elected, compared to 7% for Singh. Singh is also the candidate seen as on par with Trudeau (30%) in protecting the interests of cultural, religious, and other minorities in Canada (29%), compared to 13% for O’Toole.

In comparing these perceptions with recent Ipsos polling on issue Canadians care about the most, sentiment on choice for best Prime Minister and on each of the candidates is given a bit more colour. The most recent Ipsos polling has found that healthcare, the COVID-19 pandemic, and the economy are the top three issues that are the most related to how Canadians will vote in September. It is therefore unsurprising that Canadians may wish to stick with the candidate who has navigated the country through the pandemic and provided economic support to struggling Canadians as the end may still be far from view.

Party Leader Attributes: Which Major Federal Party Leader is Someone Who Is/Will…

 

Trudeau

O’Toole

Singh

Paul

Blanchet

None of them

Will keep their election promises

24%

16%

16%

3%

3%

38%

Make things more affordable

22%

18%

20%

2%

3%

35%

You can trust

28%

16%

17%

3%

3%

34%

Spend taxpayer money wisely

25%

21%

15%

2%

2%

33%

Means what they say

25%

17%

20%

3%

4%

32%

Gives me hope about the future

27%

18%

18%

4%

3%

30%

Is sincere

26%

15%

22%

4%

4%

29%

Provide open, responsible, and ethical government

27%

18%

21%

3%

3%

28%

Whose values represent my own

28%

19%

19%

3%

4%

27%

Best to manage during tough economic times

34%

22%

13%

3%

2%

26%

Get things done

31%