BUSINESS & POLITICS IN THE WORLD

 

GLOBAL OPINION REPORT NO. 708

 

 

Week: September 13 –September 19, 2021

 

Presentation: September 24, 2021

 

 

Contents

 

708-43-21/Commentary: Only 1 In 5 French People Are In Favor Of Hunting. 2

ASIA   11

55% Of Pakistanis Are Happy With The Taliban Rule In Afghanistan. 11

AFRICA.. 13

Unemployment Is Zimbabweans’ Biggest Concern, Cited By 38% Of Respondents As One Of Their Top Three Priorities For Government Action. 13

WEST EUROPE.. 16

Two-Thirds Of Public Say Firms Should Be Allowed To Tackle Worker Shortages By Recruiting From Overseas. 16

One In Three Non-Retired Britons Think They’ll Never Be Able To Afford To Give Up Work. 18

Six In Ten Brits Oppose Climate Change Protesters Blocking The M25. 20

4 In 10 Britons Considering A Holiday Abroad Next Year While 8 In 10 Will Stick To The UK.. 22

Only 1 In 5 French People Are In Favor Of Hunting. 24

20 Percent Of The German Citizens Entitled To Vote State That They Will Vote For The CDU / CSU If There Would Be A General Election Next Sunday. 26

NORTH AMERICA.. 28

73% Americans Say They Are Vaccinated, But At Least Half Express Confusion. 28

Simone Biles Was Mentioned In More Than 650,000 Tweets, Or 31% Of The Total 69

Canadians Increasingly Worried About Covid-19 Variants (88%, +7), Fourth Wave (71%, +2) 73

Dead Heat Down The Home Stretch: In Final Days Of Campaign, Liberals (32%, Unchanged) And Tories (32%, -3) Are Neck And Neck While NDP (21%, Unchanged) Vote Holds Steady. 76

67% Of Gen Z In Canada Is “Certain” They Will Vote In This Election. 77

Poll Finds Trudeau (32%, -2) Narrowly Remains Best Choice For Prime Minister, Over O’Toole (29%, Unchanged) And Singh (25%, -4) 80

AUSTRALIA.. 84

Almost 3 Million New Zealanders Read Newspapers And Nearly 1.8 Million Read Magazines In 2021. 85

57% Of Australians Approve Of The Federal Government’s Agreement To Purchase Nuclear Submarines From The USA   91

MULTICOUNTRY STUDIES. 93

Six-In-Ten U S Adults Say That They Are Concerned That Global Climate Change Will Harm Them Personally. 93

Most Adults Vaccinated Against Covid-19 In All 13 Countries Surveyed Intend To Get A Booster Shot 97

More Than Half Of Respondents (53%) Agree That Germany Has Been A Trustworthy Partner For Their Country On European Issues Under Angela Merkel 100

As Delta Spreads, Global Consumer Confidence Is Frozen In Place. 103

 


 

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

This weekly report consists of twenty surveys. The report includes four multi-country studies from different states across the globe.

 

708-43-21/Commentary: Only 1 In 5 French People Are In Favor Of Hunting

The key lessons of the study:

The French are still predominantly opposed to hunting (51%, stable).

The arguments against hunting are growing among the French population. In addition, two-thirds of French people oppose the idea that hunters are the first environmentalists in France.

The idea that hunting is part of French cultural heritage is declining sharply (shared by 58% of French people, down 6 points).

The French are very much in favor of hunting being more strictly regulated : nearly 6 out of 10 people questioned are in favor of all the proposals for restrictive measures tested in our survey.

Three-quarters of French people living near a hunting area say they have already avoided walking in the forest or in certain areas for fear of a hunting accident.

More than one in two French people are now opposed to hunting (51%, stable compared to 2018), a quarter of them (26%) being completely opposed to it. At the same time, only one in five French people (20%, +1 point) is in favor. Nevertheless, a not insignificant part of the population does not express an opinion with regard to hunting: 29% of the French are indifferent to it.

These figures are very stable compared to 2018.

On the subject of hunting, the opinion of people living in rural areas is approaching more and more the opinion of city dwellers: the difference between rural (47% are opposed to it) and urban (52%) has narrowed. 3 points in 3 years.

The opinion on hunting remains largely gendered: when 58% of women are opposed to it, only 44% of men are. A report equivalent to that of 2018.

Despite their opposition to hunting, the French nevertheless attribute certain qualities to the practice. Six in ten people consider that hunting is essential to manage animal populations and 58% think that hunting is part of the French cultural heritage. However, this last figure is down sharply: -6 points compared to 2018. In addition, only a minority consider that hunting is a hobby like any other (39%).

The proportion of French people who agree with the arguments against hunting is much higher. They are 83% (-1 point) to declare hunting as a source of safety problems for walkers and they are a clear majority to say that it is a cruel practice (65%, +2 points) and of another age (56%, +2 points). For the moment, they are less inclined to consider that it is a polluting practice (41%) but this figure - like the two previous ones - is up compared to 2018 (+2 points).

Beyond their overall progress, support for anti-hunting arguments is above all more frank than in 2018 . They are 50% (+3 points) to totally agree that it poses security problems, 34% (+4 points) to totally agree that it is a cruel practice, 28% strongly agree that it is of another age (+3 points) and 17% are completely in line with the idea that it is a polluting practice (+3 points).

In detail, we note a strong increase in anti-hunting arguments among rural inhabitants . They are 64% (+4 points) to consider that it is a cruel practice and 37% (+6 points) to declare that it is a polluting practice. At the same time, in rural areas, there has been a marked decline in the cultural argument justifying hunting: although a majority still adhere to it (62%), there is nevertheless a clear decrease (-7 points).

Contrary to what the campaign published by the National Federation of Hunters affirmed, namely that hunters were the first environmentalists in France, two in three French people (66%) do not agree with this idea.

Once again, the opinion is also gendered here . 60% of men say they disagree with this statement, compared to 72% of women.

Finally, even if their opposition is slightly lower than the national average, the inhabitants of rural areas are also mostly in disagreement with this idea (61% oppose it, against 68% of urban residents ).

The French are very supportive of an in-depth reform of hunting . 93% of them want the introduction of a compulsory annual medical examination for the hunting license with sight control and 83% want to ban hunting in enclosures (new item).

If the figures remain stable and high, two items mark a significant increase. The ban on hunting species in a poor state of conservation (90% are in favor) and the ban on raising game intended to be released for hunting (77%) recorded an increase of 7 and 12 points respectively.

In detail, the items are on the rise everywhere, even among rural areas, with a very significant increase in the ban on raising game intended to be released for hunting (82%, +21 points).

Finally, while 39% of them say they have already been confronted with shocking facts related to hunting in their area, the majority of people living near a hunting area have already been worried about the idea of hunting. walking in the forest (75%, 56% of whom were several times) and even avoiding these areas because of the presence of hunters (76%, 60% of whom were several times).

Once again, there is a difference according to gender for these items: women are more willing to avoid walking in the forest (82%) or to worry (80%) when they walk there than men ( 71% and 70%).

(Ipsos French)

September 16, 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/fr-fr/seul-1-francais-sur-5-est-favorable-la-chasse

708-43-22/Country Profile:

FRANCE2FRANCE3

SUMMARY OF POLLS

ASIA

(Pakistan)

55% Of Pakistanis Are Happy With The Taliban Rule In Afghanistan

According to a survey conducted by Gallup & Gilani Pakistan, 55% of Pakistanis claim that they are happy that the Taliban will now rule Afghanistan. A nationally representative sample of adult men and women from across the four provinces was asked the following question, “Some people are happy that the Taliban will now rule Afghanistan. Some are not happy about that. What is your opinion?” In response to this question, 55% said they are happy, 25% said they are unhappy, 16% did not know and 4% did not response.

(Gallup Pakistan)

September 14, 2021

AFRICA

(Zimbabwe)

Unemployment Is Zimbabweans’ Biggest Concern, Cited By 38% Of Respondents As One Of Their Top Three Priorities For Government Action

Unemployment is Zimbabweans’ biggest concern, cited by 38% of respondents as one of their top three priorities for government action. Infrastructure/roads (33%), education (31%), management of the economy (26%), and water supply (20%) round out the top five. A lack of jobs is more widely seen as a priority in the cities (45%) than in rural areas (33%), as is management of the economy (36% vs. 19%).

(Afrobarometer)

14 September 2021

 

WEST EUROPE

(UK)

Two-Thirds Of Public Say Firms Should Be Allowed To Tackle Worker Shortages By Recruiting From Overseas

Two thirds of the public (65%) agree that employers should be allowed to recruit from overseas for any job where there are shortages. 77% of the public say recruitment from overseas should be allowed for positions in key services such as health and social care. Just 13% say it should not be allowed. Support rises to 86% among people aged over 65. 67% say recruitment from overseas should be allowed for temporary seasonal work in sectors such as fruit-picking and hospitality. Just 21% say it should not be allowed.

(Ipsos MORI)

14 September 2021

 

One In Three Non-Retired Britons Think They’ll Never Be Able To Afford To Give Up Work

A third of the public who have not retired (36%) don’t think they’ll ever be able to afford to retire completely. Those in the C2DE demographic group – many of whom do manual work – are much more likely than those in the ABC1 social group – who tend to hold managerial or administrative positions – to believe they won’t have enough money to give up work later in life (45% to 31%). Only two in five (41%) non-retired people believe they either already can or will afford to give up work.

(YouGov UK)

September 15, 2021

 

Six In Ten Brits Oppose Climate Change Protesters Blocking The M25

New YouGov polling shows that four in ten Britons have heard “a great deal” or “a fair amount” about the protests (42%), with Londoners and Southerners most likely to be aware (48% and 47%, respectively). Nevertheless, most Britons have heard little (33%) to nothing (21%) about the demonstrations. While many are unaware of the protests, those who have heard much about them are even more negative: opposition to the action grows to 70% amongst Brits who had heard a great deal or fair amount about the protests.

(YouGov UK)

September 17, 2021

 

4 In 10 Britons Considering A Holiday Abroad Next Year While 8 In 10 Will Stick To The UK

New research by Ipsos MORI shows Britons are divided at the thought of travelling abroad with 2 in 5 (42%) considering a foreign holiday in the next 12 months, given the current situation. However, twice as many (81%) are likely to plan ‘staycations’ or holidays elsewhere in the UK.  Looking in more detail, 36% would consider a trip within Europe while only a quarter (25%) would think about going elsewhere. However, there have been slight increases since last year; when asked in August 2020, 31% said they would go somewhere in Europe while 20% would go further afield.

(Ipsos MORI)

19 September 2021

 

(France)

Only 1 In 5 French People Are In Favor Of Hunting

The French are still predominantly opposed to hunting (51%, stable). The arguments against hunting are growing among the French population. In addition, two-thirds of French people oppose the idea that hunters are the first environmentalists in France. The idea that hunting is part of French cultural heritage is declining sharply (shared by 58% of French people, down 6 points). The French are very much in favor of hunting being more strictly regulated : nearly 6 out of 10 people questioned are in favor of all the proposals for restrictive measures tested in our survey.

(Ipsos French)

September 16, 2021

 

(Germany)

20 Percent Of The German Citizens Entitled To Vote State That They Will Vote For The CDU / CSU If There Would Be A General Election Next Sunday

20 percent of the German citizens entitled to vote state that they will vote for the CDU / CSU if there would be a general election next Sunday. This value is 1 percentage point lower compared to the previous week and is identical to the value from 14 days ago. The SPD also lost 1 percentage point compared to the beginning of September and landed at 25 percent. The gap between the two parties therefore remains at 5 percentage points again. Alliance 90 / The Greens remain unchanged at 15 percent for the third week in a row.

(YouGov Germany)

September 16, 2021

 

NORTH AMERICA

(USA)

73% Americans Say They Are Vaccinated, But At Least Half Express Confusion

More than a year and a half into the coronavirus outbreak, large shares of Americans continue to see the coronavirus as a major threat to public health and the U.S. economy. And despite widespread vaccination efforts, 54% of U.S. adults say the worst of the outbreak is still to come. Still, when asked to issue an overall judgment, Americans on balance view the public health benefits of these restrictions as having been worth the costs (62% to 37%).

(PEW)

SEPTEMBER 15, 2021

 

Simone Biles Was Mentioned In More Than 650,000 Tweets, Or 31% Of The Total

Twitter accounts directly mentioned the handles of U.S. Olympians in more than 2.1 million tweets. The vast majority (90%) of those athlete accounts were mentioned at least once during that time. These mentions were especially concentrated on a few key dates. Nearly a third (31%) of all athlete mentions occurred during the three days of July 27-29, a period that included the women’s team and individual gymnastics finals and swimmer Katie Ledecky winning the gold medal in the 1,500-meter freestyle.

(PEW)

SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

 

(Canada)

Canadians Increasingly Worried About Covid-19 Variants (88%, +7), Fourth Wave (71%, +2)

A recent Ipsos poll on conducted on behalf of Global News finds that Canadians are more worried about the fourth wave than they were when it was only a possibility (71%, +2) and are especially more concerned about COVID-19 variants delaying things getting back to normal (88%, +7). Furthermore, Canadians are now less likely to agree that the spread of less-serious COVID-19 cases is acceptable in order to live without restrictions (52%, -4), which could include mask or distancing mandates.

(Ipsos Canada)

13 September 2021

 

Dead Heat Down The Home Stretch: In Final Days Of Campaign, Liberals (32%, Unchanged) And Tories (32%, -3) Are Neck And Neck While NDP (21%, Unchanged) Vote Holds Steady

If the election were held tomorrow, the Conservatives and the Liberals would both receive 32% of the decided national popular vote, while the NDP would receive 21% of the vote. On a national basis, the Bloc would receive 7% of the vote (unchanged), (32% of the vote within Quebec), while the Green Party (4%, +2) and PPC (3%, +1) would receive a smaller share of the vote. One percent (1%, +1) would vote for some other party, and 4% would not vote. One in ten (11%, -1) Canadians remain undecided.

(Ipsos Canada)

15 September 2021

 

67% Of Gen Z In Canada Is “Certain” They Will Vote In This Election

Gen Z is considering voting strategically this election cycle: four in ten (41%) say they will vote for a candidate they think could win but is not their first choice, compared to 25% of the general population who says the same thing. Who is the candidate Gen Z thinks could win? It seems many have not decided or are waffling on their decision: 10% of Gen Z are undecided voters. Even among those who provided a preferred party, 68% aren’t absolutely certain that their stated party is who they’ll actually vote for.

(Ipsos Canada)

15 September 2021

 

Poll Finds Trudeau (32%, -2) Narrowly Remains Best Choice For Prime Minister, Over O’Toole (29%, Unchanged) And Singh (25%, -4)

Based on current Ipsos polling data, Trudeau and Singh continue to poll on par or ahead of the overall vote intention for their respective parties (32% of Canadians say they intend to vote for the Liberal party, and 32% of Canadians say Trudeau is the best fit to be the Prime Minister; 21% of Canadians intend to vote for the NDP, and 25% of Canadians say Singh is the best fit to be the Prime Minister). O’Toole and Blanchet continue to trail their parties.

(Ipsos Canada)

16 September 2021

 

AUSTRALIA

(New Zealand)

Almost 3 Million New Zealanders Read Newspapers And Nearly 1.8 Million Read Magazines In 2021

2.96 million, or 71.7%, of New Zealanders aged 14+ now read or access newspapers in an average 7-day period via print or online (website or app) platforms. In addition, almost 1.8 million New Zealanders aged 14+ (42.5%) read magazines whether in print or online either via the web or an app. These are the latest findings from the Roy Morgan New Zealand Single Source survey of 6,609 New Zealanders aged 14+ over the 12 months to June 2021.

(Roy Morgan)

September 13 2021

 

(Australia)

57% Of Australians Approve Of The Federal Government’s Agreement To Purchase Nuclear Submarines From The USA

There are large differences based on voting intention on this question with 89% of L-NP supporters approving of the agreement to buy nuclear-powered submarines from the United States compared to 47% of ALP supporters and only 14% of Greens supporters. Supporters of One Nation (79%) and the United Australia Party (71%) are also clearly in approval of the agreement. There is also a clear gender gap with over two-thirds of men (68%) approving of the agreement to buy nuclear-powered submarines compared to only 46% of women.

(Roy Morgan)

September 16 2021

 

MULTICOUNTRY STUDIES

Six-In-Ten U S Adults Say That They Are Concerned That Global Climate Change Will Harm Them Personally

Six-in-ten U.S. adults say that they are concerned that global climate change will harm them personally, compared with a median of 72% who say the same across the 17 publics. However, 74% of Americans are willing to make a lot or some changes in their lifestyles to deal with climate change, closer to the eight-in-ten median who say that elsewhere. When it comes to rating their own society’s role in dealing with climate change, Americans are slightly less likely than people elsewhere to say their own government is handling it well.

(PEW)

SEPTEMBER 14, 2021

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/09/14/americans-are-less-concerned-but-more-divided-on-climate-change-than-people-elsewhere/

 

Most Adults Vaccinated Against Covid-19 In All 13 Countries Surveyed Intend To Get A Booster Shot

A new 13-country Ipsos survey conducted in partnership with the World Economic Forum finds large majorities of adults fully vaccinated against COVID-19 saying they would get a booster shot if it were available to them. Booster uptake intent ranges from 62% in Russia to 96% in Brazil. It is higher among those aged 55 and older in many countries. In all but one of the 13 countries, most citizens surveyed expect vaccine booster shots to be required at least annually to maintain protection against COVID-19. However, majorities of adults in every country agree that the priority for vaccines should be first doses for those who want them before making booster shots available.

(Ipsos MORI)

13 September 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/ipsos-mori/en-uk/global-attitudes-covid-19-vaccine-booster-shots

 

More Than Half Of Respondents (53%) Agree That Germany Has Been A Trustworthy Partner For Their Country On European Issues Under Angela Merkel

On average, across 11 European countries, more than half of respondents (53%) agree that Germany has been a trustworthy partner for their country on European issues under Angela Merkel, with only a quarter (25%) disagreeing. Net agreement (% in agreement minus % in disagreement) is highest in the Netherlands (+58), Sweden (+50), and France (+44), but it is barely positive in Hungary (+4), Turkey (+7), and Italy (+9). Across 16 non-European countries, agreement is even higher, with 55% believing that Germany has been a reliable partner for their country on global issues; only 14% think it has not. Net agreement ranges from 57 points in India to 15 points in Japan.

(Ipsos Canada)

15 September 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-ca/news-polls/global-views-angela-merkel-and-german-leadership

 

As Delta Spreads, Global Consumer Confidence Is Frozen In Place

The Global Consumer Confidence Index is the average of 24 countries’ National Indices. It is based on a monthly survey of more than 17,500 adults under the age of 75 conducted on Ipsos’ Global Advisor online platform. This survey was fielded between August 20 and September 3, 2021. India is the only country out of the 24 surveyed to show significant change in its National Index score – an increase of 2.1 points since last month. At a global level, the Jobs Index sees its ninth consecutive month of growth (+0.5 point), but the Investment and Expectations Indices remain nearly the same (both -0.1).

(Ipsos Canada)

16 September 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-ca/news-polls/delta-spreads-global-consumer-confidence-frozen-place

ASIA

708-43-01/Polls

55% Of Pakistanis Are Happy With The Taliban Rule In Afghanistan

According to a survey conducted by Gallup & Gilani Pakistan, 55% of Pakistanis claim that they are happy that the Taliban will now rule Afghanistan. A nationally representative sample of adult men and women from across the four provinces was asked the following question, “Some people are happy that the Taliban will now rule Afghanistan. Some are not happy about that. What is your opinion?” In response to this question, 55% said they are happy, 25% said they are unhappy, 16% did not know and 4% did not response.

Urban-rural breakdown

More people from rural areas (28%) feel unhappy about the Taliban now ruling Afghanistan as compared to those from urban areas (20%).

Provincial Breakdown

Relatively more people from KPK (65%) are happy that the Taliban are now ruling Afghanistan as compared to the other provinces.

Gender Breakdown

Higher number of males (58%) are happy about the Taliban now ruling Afghanistan as compared to females (36%).

Age Breakdown

A greater number older aged people i.e. those above 50 years of age (68%) are happy about the Taliban ruling Afghanistan as compared to those aged under 30 (52%) or those aged between 30 to 50 years old (55%).

(Gallup Pakistan)

September 14, 2021

Source: https://gallup.com.pk/wp/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/14th-Sept-happy-with-taliban-rule.pdf

 

AFRICA

708-43-02/Polls

Unemployment Is Zimbabweans’ Biggest Concern, Cited By 38% Of Respondents As One Of Their Top Three Priorities For Government Action

Unemployment remains the most important problem that Zimbabweans want their government to address, according to the latest Afrobarometer survey.

Infrastructure/roads, education, management of the economy, and water supply follow as top priorities on citizens’ agenda.

While rankings vary somewhat by respondents’ location, gender, generation, and education levels, the major concerns are fairly consistent across demographic groups.

Key findings

▪ Unemployment is Zimbabweans’ biggest concern, cited by 38% of respondents as one of their top three priorities for government action. Infrastructure/roads (33%), education (31%), management of the economy (26%), and water supply (20%) round out the top five (Figure 1).

▪A lack of jobs is more widely seen as a priority in the cities (45%) than in rural areas

(33%), as is management of the economy (36% vs. 19%) (Figure 2).

o Rural residents are more likely than their urban counterparts to prioritize health

(25% vs. 11%) and water supply (23% vs. 16%).

▪ Men are somewhat more likely than women to rank unemployment and infrastructure/roads among the most important problems that government should address. More women than men cite food shortage as a top concern (Figure 3).

▪Among youth, unemployment (40%) and education (35%) top the list of priorities

(Table 1).

o Among respondents with primary schooling or less, education (33%) ranks as the

No. 1 concern.

(Afrobarometer)

14 September 2021

Source: https://afrobarometer.org/sites/default/files/press-release/Zimbabwe/news_release_unemployment_is_zimbabweans_top_priority_for_government_action-afrobarometer_14sept21.pdf

 

WEST EUROPE

708-43-03/Polls

Two-Thirds Of Public Say Firms Should Be Allowed To Tackle Worker Shortages By Recruiting From Overseas

The report, Immigration: a changing debateby the independent think tank British Future, draws on the latest findings from Ipsos MORI research that has tracked changing public attitudes to immigration across twelve waves of research since 2015. It finds: 

  • Two thirds of the public (65%) agree that employers should be allowed to recruit from overseas for any job where there are shortages. 
  • 77% of the public say recruitment from overseas should be allowed for positions in key services such as health and social care. Just 13% say it should not be allowed. Support rises to 86% among people aged over 65. 
  • 67% say recruitment from overseas should be allowed for temporary seasonal work in sectors such as fruit-picking and hospitality. Just 21% say it should not be allowed.
  • Most of the public (55%) also support recruitment from overseas for lower- skilled jobs that are hard to fill from within the UK. Three in ten (30%) say it should not be allowed.
  • Nearly twice as many people favour an approach to immigration that prioritises the government having control over who can settle in the UK, whether or not that reduces numbers (44%) over a system that is focused on keeping immigration numbers low (24%).

This year sees a new balance in immigration attitudes. Roughly twice a year since 2015 this survey has asked the public if they would prefer immigration to increase, decrease or remain at its current level. The number of people who want to reduce immigration is now at its lowest level in the series (45%), while more people than ever before would be happy for immigration to increase (17%). For the first time, the proportion of people wanting to reduce immigration (45%) is on a par with the 46% who either want to keep it at current levels (29%) or higher (17%).

The research also notes a continuing trend of the public feeling that immigration has a positive impact (46%) more than a negative impact (28%) on Britain. When the tracker survey was conducted in February 2015, by comparison, it found only 35% were positive and 41% were negative.

Britons remain positive about the impact of immigration staying similar to what they were in Nov 2020

Sunder Katwala, Director of the independent think tank British Future that led the research, said:

Public attitudes to immigration are warmer today than at any point since 2015, as opinion has gradually shifted since 2016.
The debate has moved on from the numbers fixation of the last decade. People still want an approach that offers fairness and control – but there is public consent for the immigration that our economy needs. 
It means the government has political space to allow more recruitment from overseas to fill the workforce gaps causing shortages, while employers address longer-term issues like training and pay.

Gideon Skinner, Research Director at Ipsos MORI, said:

As recent stories have highlighted, even though it may have slipped down the public agenda in recent years, immigration continues to have important social and economic implications for the country, and understanding public views as the situation changes is vital – with many still thinking it is discussed too little.
The public mood has shifted over time to become more positive, and there is clear support for using immigration to help fill job shortages in key sectors. But opinion is still not unanimous on key questions such as the total level of immigration, or on the best system to deal with refugees (even before Afghanistan), which means the debate is still not over.

Neil Carberry, Chief Executive of the Recruitment & Employment Confederation (REC), said:

The UK is experiencing a serious shortage of labour right now, affecting every sector across the country. Re-opening the economy has created a short-term crisis, but a number of factors mean that the jobs market will remain tight for years to come.
While businesses need to look to how they build their future workforces, it’s vital that government prioritises solving the immediate crisis. One way to do that is by making sure the new immigration system flexes when there is evidence of skills and labour shortages, allowing employers to hire workers from abroad to help fill gaps in essential sectors like logistics.
As this timely research makes clear, this would be a popular move as well as making logical sense – we’re asking government to act now and help solve these chronic shortages.

The report also finds that only 12% of the public say they are currently satisfied with how the government is handling immigration, compared to 55% who say they are dissatisfied. It also includes sections on public attitudes to new immigration from Hong Kong and to UK refugee protection, though fieldwork was conducted prior to the refugee crisis in Afghanistan.

(Ipsos MORI)

14 September 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/ipsos-mori/en-uk/two-thirds-public-say-firms-should-be-allowed-tackle-worker-shortages-recruiting-overseas

 

708-43-04/Polls

One In Three Non-Retired Britons Think They’ll Never Be Able To Afford To Give Up Work

Many Britons don’t think they will be able to retire and are not confident that they could cover their elderly care costs, a new YouGov survey shows.

A third of the public who have not retired (36%) don’t think they’ll ever be able to afford to retire completely. Those in the C2DE demographic group – many of whom do manual work – are much more likely than those in the ABC1 social group – who tend to hold managerial or administrative positions – to believe they won’t have enough money to give up work later in life (45% to 31%).

Only two in five (41%) non-retired people believe they either already can or will afford to give up work. Among this group, the median age at which they think they will have enough to retire on is 65. While this is the same age as those in ABC1 positions, it rises to 67 among those in the C2DE social grade.

Many people are not confident they’ll be able to cover living or care costs in old age

The government is facing increasing pressure to reform social care and devote enough funding to ensure elderly people’s savings are not depleted by care costs. YouGov’s research suggests that three in five (61%) say they’re ‘not confident’ they will have saved up enough to cover their own care costs in old age, while one in five are uncertain (20%). Only a fifth (20%) are confident that they could cover them.

People in the C2DE social group are less confident than those in the ABC1 category to think they’ll be able to afford care costs (70% versus 55%).

YouGov’s research also asked about how non-retired people feel about being able to cover the cost of living later in life. Britons are split on this, with 45% being confident they will have enough to cover the cost of living while 43% are not confident. Another 11% remain unsure.

Moreover, half (52%) of those who are not yet retired are not convinced they will be able to live comfortably in old age while only a third (36%) feel confident they will. A further 12% are uncertain.

(YouGov UK)

September 15, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/economy/articles-reports/2021/09/15/one-three-non-retired-britons-think-theyll-never-b

 

708-43-05/Polls

Six In Ten Brits Oppose Climate Change Protesters Blocking The M25

This week climate change protesters have brought key sections of the M25 to a halt by blocking major junctions, including those to Heathrow Terminal 4 and Lakeside shopping centre in Essex. The protesters are aiming to bring attention to the issue of climate change, specifically campaigning for more investment in making homes energy efficient.

New YouGov polling shows that four in ten Britons have heard “a great deal” or “a fair amount” about the protests (42%), with Londoners and Southerners most likely to be aware (48% and 47%, respectively).

Nevertheless, most Britons have heard little (33%) to nothing (21%) about the demonstrations.

There is, however, limited support for the protests. Six in ten adults (59%) oppose the protesters' actions, with just a quarter of adults (25%) backing them. While many are unaware of the protests, those who have heard much about them are even more negative: opposition to the action grows to 70% amongst Brits who had heard a great deal or fair amount about the protests.

Support does, however, rise to 49% amongst adults who listed pollution, the environment and climate change as one of their top three most important issues facing the country (higher than the 39% of this group who are opposed).

A majority of Brits (64%) also feel that this kind of action actually hinders the cause of the wider climate change movement. Older adults hold this view particularly strongly, with 73% saying this action is damaging to public perceptions of the climate change movement. Just 15% think this sort of behaviour endears the cause to the public.

While those who rank the environment highly as an important issue tend to be more supportive of the protests, they do not think it is helpful for the environmentalist cause overall. By 55% to 16%, this group feel that this kind of action hinders garnering public support for the fight against climate change.

(YouGov UK)

September 17, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2021/09/17/six-ten-brits-oppose-climate-change-protesters-blo

 

708-43-06/Polls

4 In 10 Britons Considering A Holiday Abroad Next Year While 8 In 10 Will Stick To The UK

New research by Ipsos MORI shows Britons are divided at the thought of travelling abroad with 2 in 5 (42%) considering a foreign holiday in the next 12 months, given the current situation. However, twice as many (81%) are likely to plan ‘staycations’ or holidays elsewhere in the UK.  

Who is planning on going on holiday over the next year?Looking in more detail, 36% would consider a trip within Europe while only a quarter (25%) would think about going elsewhere. However, there have been slight increases since last year; when asked in August 2020, 31% said they would go somewhere in Europe while 20% would go further afield.

Who is planning on going on holiday over the next year?Staycations remain the most likely option with 7 in 10 (70%) considering staying at home and/or doing various daytrips from where they live over the next year (no change from last year) while two-thirds (65%) would think about going somewhere in the UK further away from where they live (up from 60% last August).

This still means more people are considering holidays abroad and at home over the next 12 months than were able to take them this year.  This year, only around 1 in 10 (8%) of Britons have been on holiday abroad (6% within Europe while 3% have gone elsewhere). Younger Britons are most likely to have gone abroad: 15% of 16-34-year olds have been away compared with only 7% of 35-54s and 4% of 55-75s. The middle classes are also more likely to have been away: 11% of ABC1s have gone abroad this year while only 5% of C2DEs have done the same. 

Only 4 in 10 (39%) of Britons have stayed somewhere in the UK for at least one night away from home, while a quarter have done various day trips. Four in 10 (40%) did not take any of these types of holidays. 

Who has been on holiday so far this year?Gideon Skinner, Research Director at Ipsos MORI, says:

This year has still seen the effect of the pandemic with UK holidays and staycations much more popular than trips abroad.  Looking ahead to next 12 months, there are some signs that Britons are becoming slightly more optimistic about returning to their foreign travels, obviously depending on the situation, but the domestic staycation appears to be here to stay.

(Ipsos MORI)

19 September 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/ipsos-mori/en-uk/4-10-britons-considering-holiday-abroad-next-year-while-8-10-will-stick-uk

 

708-43-07/Polls

Only 1 In 5 French People Are In Favor Of Hunting

The key lessons of the study:

  • The French are still predominantly opposed to hunting (51%, stable).
  • The arguments against hunting are growing among the French population. In addition, two-thirds of French people oppose the idea that hunters are the first environmentalists in France.
  • The idea that hunting is part of French cultural heritage is declining sharply (shared by 58% of French people, down 6 points).
  • The French are very much in favor of hunting being more strictly regulated : nearly 6 out of 10 people questioned are in favor of all the proposals for restrictive measures tested in our survey.
  • Three-quarters of French people living near a hunting area say they have already avoided walking in the forest or in certain areas for fear of a hunting accident.

More than one in two French people are now opposed to hunting (51%, stable compared to 2018), a quarter of them (26%) being completely opposed to it. At the same time, only one in five French people (20%, +1 point) is in favor. Nevertheless, a not insignificant part of the population does not express an opinion with regard to hunting: 29% of the French are indifferent to it.

  • These figures are very stable compared to 2018.
  • On the subject of hunting, the opinion of people living in rural areas is approaching more and more the opinion of city dwellers: the difference between rural (47% are opposed to it) and urban (52%) has narrowed. 3 points in 3 years.
  • The opinion on hunting remains largely gendered: when 58% of women are opposed to it, only 44% of men are. A report equivalent to that of 2018.

Despite their opposition to hunting, the French nevertheless attribute certain qualities to the practice. Six in ten people consider that hunting is essential to manage animal populations and 58% think that hunting is part of the French cultural heritage. However, this last figure is down sharply: -6 points compared to 2018. In addition, only a minority consider that hunting is a hobby like any other (39%).

The proportion of French people who agree with the arguments against hunting is much higher. They are 83% (-1 point) to declare hunting as a source of safety problems for walkers and they are a clear majority to say that it is a cruel practice (65%, +2 points) and of another age (56%, +2 points). For the moment, they are less inclined to consider that it is a polluting practice (41%) but this figure - like the two previous ones - is up compared to 2018 (+2 points).

  • Beyond their overall progress, support for anti-hunting arguments is above all more frank than in 2018 . They are 50% (+3 points) to totally agree that it poses security problems, 34% (+4 points) to totally agree that it is a cruel practice, 28% strongly agree that it is of another age (+3 points) and 17% are completely in line with the idea that it is a polluting practice (+3 points).
  • In detail, we note a strong increase in anti-hunting arguments among rural inhabitants . They are 64% (+4 points) to consider that it is a cruel practice and 37% (+6 points) to declare that it is a polluting practice. At the same time, in rural areas, there has been a marked decline in the cultural argument justifying hunting: although a majority still adhere to it (62%), there is nevertheless a clear decrease (-7 points).

Contrary to what the campaign published by the National Federation of Hunters affirmed, namely that hunters were the first environmentalists in France, two in three French people (66%) do not agree with this idea.

  • Once again, the opinion is also gendered here . 60% of men say they disagree with this statement, compared to 72% of women.
  • Finally, even if their opposition is slightly lower than the national average, the inhabitants of rural areas are also mostly in disagreement with this idea (61% oppose it, against 68% of urban residents ).

The French are very supportive of an in-depth reform of hunting . 93% of them want the introduction of a compulsory annual medical examination for the hunting license with sight control and 83% want to ban hunting in enclosures (new item).

  • If the figures remain stable and high, two items mark a significant increase. The ban on hunting species in a poor state of conservation (90% are in favor) and the ban on raising game intended to be released for hunting (77%) recorded an increase of 7 and 12 points respectively.
  • In detail, the items are on the rise everywhere, even among rural areas, with a very significant increase in the ban on raising game intended to be released for hunting (82%, +21 points).

Finally, while 39% of them say they have already been confronted with shocking facts related to hunting in their area, the majority of people living near a hunting area have already been worried about the idea of hunting. walking in the forest (75%, 56% of whom were several times) and even avoiding these areas because of the presence of hunters (76%, 60% of whom were several times).

  • Once again, there is a difference according to gender for these items: women are more willing to avoid walking in the forest (82%) or to worry (80%) when they walk there than men ( 71% and 70%).

(Ipsos French)

September 16, 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/fr-fr/seul-1-francais-sur-5-est-favorable-la-chasse

 

708-43-08/Polls

20 Percent Of The German Citizens Entitled To Vote State That They Will Vote For The CDU / CSU If There Would Be A General Election Next Sunday

20 percent of the German citizens entitled to vote state that they will vote for the CDU / CSU if there would be a general election next Sunday. This value is 1 percentage point lower compared to the previous week and is identical to the value from 14 days ago. The SPD also lost 1 percentage point compared to the beginning of September and landed at 25 percent. The gap between the two parties therefore remains at 5 percentage points again. Alliance 90 / The Greens remain unchanged at 15 percent for the third week in a row.

Sunday question September_2 2021

The FDP also remains unchanged at 10 percent. The left, on the other hand, could gain 2 percentage points and land again at 8 percent (cf. 6 percent in the previous week). The AfD ends up at 11 percent. The free voters reach 3 percent for the first time in this election campaign. 7 percent of the German eligible voters who intend to vote would vote for other parties this week if there were to be a federal election next Sunday.

Timeline of the Sunday question September_2 2021

That is the result of the current Sunday question, for which 1,816 people out of 2,089 survey participants who are eligible to vote submitted their voting intention between 09.09.2021 and 14.09.2021.

Environmental and climate protection the most important topic for Germans

According to the respondents, the most important topic that politicians in Germany should be concerned about at the moment is environmental and climate protection. This is what one in four of the eligible voters surveyed said (25 percent). The respondents most often agree that the Greens have problem-solving skills on this issue (38 percent), with CDU / CSU mentioned by 10 percent. The SPD achieved 9 percent on this question. A total of 16 percent of all respondents say that they do not attribute solution competence to any party when it comes to environmental and climate protection.

Red-Green would be the most popular coalition

Regardless of the actual election result, 30 percent of those surveyed indicated that they were in favor of a coalition between the SPD and the Greens. One in four (25 percent) is in favor of a red-red-green coalition between the SPD, the Greens and the Left. 24 percent each support a grand coalition (CDU / CSU + SPD) and a black-yellow coalition made up of the Union and FDP. A traffic light coalition made up of the SPD, the Greens and the FDP achieved 22 percent approval among German voters.

Sunday question: coalitions September_2 2021

Olaf Scholz remains the most popular among the respondents

If they could elect the Federal Chancellor directly, 30 percent of Germans eligible to vote would currently vote for the SPD Chancellor candidate Olaf Scholz. 12 percent say this about Annalena Baerbock from the Greens and 11 percent about Armin Laschet as CDU / CSU candidate for chancellor. 36 percent of those surveyed said that they would not vote for any of the three chancellor candidates asked.

(YouGov Germany)

September 16, 2021

Source: https://yougov.de/news/2021/09/16/sonntagsfrage-spd-bleibt-weiter-5-prozentpunkte-vo/

 

NORTH AMERICA

708-43-09/Polls

73% Americans Say They Are Vaccinated, But At Least Half Express Confusion

More than a year and a half into the coronavirus outbreak, large shares of Americans continue to see the coronavirus as a major threat to public health and the U.S. economy. And despite widespread vaccination efforts, 54% of U.S. adults say the worst of the outbreak is still to come.

Chart shows majorities say restrictions on activity have hurt businesses, limited people’s lifestyles – but see the public health benefits as having been worth the costs

The toll of restrictions on public activities in order to slow the spread of the coronavirus is deeply felt across groups: Overwhelming majorities say restrictions have done a lot or some to hurt businesses and economic activity and keep people from living their lives the way they want. Smaller majorities say these restrictions have helped at least some to prevent hospitalizations and deaths from the coronavirus and to slow the spread of the virus. Still, when asked to issue an overall judgment, Americans on balance view the public health benefits of these restrictions as having been worth the costs (62% to 37%).

A new national survey by Pew Research Center, conducted from Aug. 23 to 29 among 10,348 U.S. adults, prior to President Joe Biden’s announcement of COVID-19 vaccine mandates for employers, finds that 73% of those ages 18 and older say they’ve received at least one dose of a vaccine for COVID-19, with the vast majority of this group saying they have received all the shots they need to be fully vaccinated. About a quarter of adults (26%) say they have not received a vaccine.

Vaccination rates vary significantly across demographic groups, with smaller majorities of younger adults, those with lower family incomes and those living in rural areas saying they’ve received a COVID-19 vaccine. No more than six-in-ten of those without health insurance and White evangelical Protestants say they’ve been vaccinated (57% each). Notably, Black adults are now about as likely as White adults to say they’ve received a vaccine. Earlier in the outbreak, Black adults were less likely than White adults to say they planned to get a COVID-19 vaccine.

Partisan affiliation remains one of the widest differences in vaccination status: 86% of Democrats and independents who lean toward the Democratic Party have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, compared with 60% of Republicans and Republican leaners.

Americans express a range of sometimes cross-pressured sentiments toward vaccines. Overall, 73% say the statement “vaccines are the best way to protect Americans from COVID-19” describes their views very or somewhat well; 60% say their views are described at least somewhat well by the statement “people who choose not to get a COVID-19 vaccine are hurting the country.”

At the same time, 51% of the public says that the phrase “there’s too much pressure on Americans to get a COVID-19 vaccine” describes their own views very or somewhat well. And 61% say the same about the statement “we don’t really know yet if there are serious health risks from COVID-19 vaccines.”

Vaccinated adults and those who have not received a vaccine differ widely in their views of vaccines – as well as other elements of the broader coronavirus outbreak. For instance, 77% of vaccinated adults say the statement “people who choose not to get a COVID-19 vaccine are hurting the country” describes them at least somewhat well. By contrast, 88% of those who have not received a vaccine say that “there’s too much pressure on Americans to get a COVID-19 vaccine” describes their own views very or somewhat well.

However, vaccinated adults are not without anxieties and concerns surrounding vaccines: 54% of this group says the statement “we don’t really know yet if there are serious health risks from COVID-19 vaccines” describes them very or somewhat well, and 50% say the same about the statement “it’s hard to make sense of all the information about COVID-19 vaccines.”

Chart shows views of COVID-19 vaccines align with vaccination status, but half or more of both groups say it is hard to make sense of all the information about vaccines

With the delta variant having changed the trajectory of the outbreak in the United States and around the world, large majorities continue to see a number of steps as necessary to address the coronavirus, including requiring masks for travelers on airplanes and public transportation (80%), restricting international travel (79%) and asking people to avoid gathering in large groups (73%).

Chart shows majority favors vaccination requirements for air travel; fewer back vaccine proof for shopping

The public is closely divided over limiting restaurants to carry-out and closing K-12 schools for in-person learning: About as many adults say these steps are unnecessary as say they are necessary.

Vaccination requirements for in-person activities have gone into effect in a number of U.S. cities, including New Orleans, New York City and San Francisco. A 61% majority of Americans favor requiring adults to show proof of vaccination before being allowed to travel by airplane. More than half also say proof of vaccination should be required to attend public colleges and universities (57%) and to go to sporting events and concerts (56%).

However, the public is less convinced that vaccine requirements are needed in other settings. Equal shares of Americans favor and oppose requiring proof of vaccination to eat inside of a restaurant (50% vs. 50%), and 54% say they oppose a vaccination requirement to shop inside stores and businesses.

The intertwined dynamics of partisan affiliation and vaccination status are visible in views of policies to limit the spread of the coronavirus and vaccine requirements. Democrats offer broad support for most measures, while Republicans back select steps – like limiting international travel and requiring masks on public transportation – while opposing others and offering very little support for vaccine mandates. Similarly, vaccinated adults are far more supportive of policy steps aimed at limiting the spread of the coronavirus – and vaccine requirements – than are those who have not received a COVID-19 vaccine.

Changes to public health guidance over course of outbreak: understandable, but also a source of concern for at least half of Americans

Over the course of the pandemic, public health officials have changed their recommendations about how to slow the spread of the coronavirus in the U.S.

Chart shows 61% say changing COVID-19 recommendations from public health officials made sense, but 51% also say they made them feel less confident in guidance

A majority of Americans (61%) say changes to public health recommendations since the start of the outbreak have made sense because scientific knowledge is always being updated. About half (51%) say these changes have reassured them that public health officials are staying on top of new information.

However, changes to public health guidance have also sparked confusion and skepticism among significant shares of the public: 55% say changes made them wonder if public health officials were holding back important information, 53% say it made them feel confused and 51% say it made them less confident in officials’ recommendations.

Taken together, 63% of U.S. adults say they’ve felt at least one of two negative reactions regarding public health officials because of changing guidance: wondering if they were holding back important information or feeling less confident in their recommendations.

Mask wearing – among the most visible examples of shifting public health guidance, as well as a policy flashpoint at the state and local level – has become less frequent since earlier this year. Overall, 53% of U.S. adults say they’ve been wearing a mask or face covering all or most of the time when in stores and businesses over the last month, down 35 percentage points from 88% who said this in February (when mask requirements around the country were more widespread).

The practice of mask wearing is now far more common among Democrats and those who have been vaccinated against COVID-19. Democrats are now more than twice as likely as Republicans to say they’ve been wearing a mask in stores and businesses all or most of the time in recent weeks (71% vs. 30%). In February, large shares of both Democrats and Republicans had reported frequent mask wearing (93% and 83%, respectively).

People who have received a COVID-19 vaccine (59%) are more likely than those who have not (37%) to say they’ve been wearing a mask all or most of the time when inside stores or businesses. Frequent mask wearing is especially high among those who say they are very concerned about getting a serious case of the disease (80%).

Black adults about as likely as White adults to have received a COVID-19 vaccine

Chart shows White evangelical Protestants, those with no health insurance among least likely to say they have received a COVID-19 vaccine

Vaccination rates differ across key demographic groups and traits, including age, family income, partisanship, health insurance status, community type and religious affiliation.

Comparable majorities of Black (70%) and White (72%) adults have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. Among Hispanic adults, 76% say they have received a vaccine, as do an overwhelming majority of English-speaking Asian adults (94%). 

At earlier stages of the outbreak, Black adults had expressed significantly lower levels of intent to get a COVID-19 vaccine than White adults.

The vaccination rate among White evangelical Protestants continues to lag behind those of other major religious groups: 57% of White evangelicals say they have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, compared with 73% of White Protestants who are not evangelicals, 75% of religiously unaffiliated adults and 82% of Catholics. For more details on vaccination status by religion, see the Appendix.

Older adults remain more likely than younger adults to have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. Age differences in vaccination status are much more pronounced among Republicans and Republican leaners than among Democrats and Democratic leaners. See the Appendix for more details.

These are among the principal findings from Pew Research Center’s survey of 10,348 U.S. adults conducted from Aug. 23 to 29, 2021, on the coronavirus outbreak and Americans’ views of a COVID-19 vaccine. The survey also finds:

39% say most businesses in the U.S. should require employees to get a COVID-19 vaccine. Another 35% say businesses should encourage employees to get a vaccine, but not require it. A quarter of the public says most businesses should neither require nor encourage employees to get a COVID-19 vaccine. The survey was fielded before President Joe Biden’s announcement that employers with more than 100 workers will be required to have their workers vaccinated or tested weekly for the coronavirus.

72% say they personally know someone who has been hospitalized or died from COVID-19. As has been the case throughout the outbreak, larger shares of Black (82%) and Hispanic (78%) adults than White (70%) and English-speaking Asian adults (64%) say they personally know someone who has been hospitalized or died as a result of the coronavirus. 

A relatively small share of Americans (26%) are aware that few adults in developing countries have access to COVID-19 vaccines. A majority (76%) places importance on the U.S. providing large numbers of COVID-19 vaccines to developing countries, though just 26% call this a top priority for the U.S.

Biden’s job ratings for handling the outbreak have declined. Larger shares now say Joe Biden is doing an only fair or poor job (52%) responding to the coronavirus outbreak than say he is doing an excellent or good job (47%). In February, 54% said he was doing an excellent or good job. By contrast, Americans continue to give very high marks to hospitals and medical centers in their area: 85% say they are doing an excellent or good job responding to the coronavirus outbreak.

Republicans grow more skeptical of scientists’ judgment. Nearly seven-in-ten Republicans (68%) say scientists’ judgments are just as likely to be biased as other people’s, up from 55% who said this in January 2019. By contrast, a growing share of Democrats take the opposite view and say scientists make judgments solely on the facts (73% of Democrats say this today, up from 62% in 2019).

Large partisan gap persists in whether COVID-19 poses serious public health threat

A majority of Americans (61%) continue to say the coronavirus outbreak poses a major threat to the health of the U.S. population as a whole. Another 33% say the virus is a minor threat, while just 6% say it is not a threat.

The share that views the coronavirus as a major threat to public health has largely held steady since late March of 2020, following the declaration of a national public health emergency in the U.S. The current share that views the coronavirus as a major threat to public health is about the same as it was in February 2021 (63%), when the country was coming out of a peak of cases and COVID-19-related deaths, and before widespread rollout of the vaccine.

A larger majority of U.S. adults (72%) say the coronavirus outbreak is a major threat to the U.S. economy. This is down slightly from February of this year, when 81% saw the outbreak as a major threat to the economy.

Chart shows partisans agree that COVID-19 poses major threat to economy, but remain divided on public health threat

Large partisan divides persist in views of the public health threat posed by COVID-19. Eight-in-ten Democrats and independents who lean toward the Democratic Party say the outbreak is a major threat to the health of the U.S. population, while just 38% of Republicans and Republican leaners say the same. The partisan gap on this question is as wide as it has been at any point during the pandemic.

Chart shows majority of vaccinated adults view the coronavirus outbreak as a major public health threat

By contrast, majorities of both Democrats (75%) and Republicans (69%) see the COVID-19 outbreak as a major threat to the country’s economy. While economic concerns remain high, the shares of both parties who see the virus as a serious concern for the economy have moved lower since February, when 83% of Democrats and 81% of Republicans said it was a major threat.

Vaccination status is closely tied to perceptions of the public health threat posed by the coronavirus outbreak: 70% of vaccinated adults view it as a major threat to the health of the U.S. population, compared with just 37% of adults who have not received a vaccine. There is shared concern over the impact on the economy, however: Majorities of both vaccinated (74%) and unvaccinated (67%) adults say the coronavirus poses a major threat to the U.S. economy.

Hospitals, medical centers continue to receive positive ratings for their outbreak response; Biden’s ratings decline

Chart shows ratings of local hospitals’ response to coronavirus outbreak remain very positive

The public continues to rate the job their local hospitals have done responding to the coronavirus very positively; these ratings have been consistently high since the early days of the pandemic. Ratings for President Joe Biden’s handling of the outbreak have declined since February and now tilt more negative than positive. Assessments of other groups, including public health officials and state and local elected officials, are steady since February, but remain lower than they were in the early stages of the outbreak.

Overall, 47% say Biden is doing an excellent or good job responding to the coronavirus outbreak, while slightly more (52%) say he is doing an only fair or poor job. Ratings for Biden have declined since February, shortly after he took office, when 54% said he was doing an excellent or good job.

A large majority of Americans (85%) say their hospitals and medical centers are doing an excellent or good job responding to the coronavirus outbreak, identical to the share who said this in February 2021.

Six-in-ten say public health officials, such as those at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), are doing an excellent or good job in their coronavirus response. This rating is lower than it was during the early months of the outbreak, but about the same as it was in February of this year (62%).

Chart shows Republicans and Democrats far apart in ratings of Biden, health officials on coronavirus response

A majority of Americans (56%) also say that their local elected officials are doing an excellent or good job responding to the outbreak. A slightly smaller share (50%) rate their state elected officials’ responses as excellent or good. As with ratings of public health officials, assessments of local and state elected officials are lower than they were early in the outbreak, but are about the same as they were when the questions were last asked six months ago.

Republicans and Democrats share positive assessments of the COVID-19 response from their local hospitals and medical centers but differ widely on the job public health officials and Biden are doing.

Large majorities of Republicans (83%) and Democrats (88%) say hospitals and medical centers in their area are doing an excellent or good job responding to the coronavirus outbreak.

By contrast, a much larger share of Democrats (79%) than Republicans (37%) give positive ratings to the job public health officials, such as those at the CDC, have done responding to the outbreak. Ratings of public health officials among Republicans are down 7 percentage points since February; as a result, the partisan gap in assessments of public health officials has grown even wider (from 35 points to 42 points in the current survey).

Partisan divides are even larger for ratings of Biden. About three-quarters of Democrats (74%) say he is doing an excellent or good job responding to the coronavirus pandemic, compared with just 15% of Republicans – a 59-point gap. Ratings of Biden are down among both parties since February, when 84% of Democrats and 20% of Republicans rated his performance highly.

The size of the partisan gap in ratings of Biden is similar to differences seen in ratings of former President Donald Trump at the end of his administration. In February, 71% of Republicans said he did an excellent or good job responding to the pandemic during his time in office, compared with just 7% of Democrats.

There are modest differences between Republicans and Democrats in assessments of how their local and state elected officials are handling the outbreak. Democrats are somewhat more likely than Republicans to rate the job being done by local officials (60% vs. 53%) and state elected officials (55% vs. 45%) as excellent or good.

54% of Americans say worst still to come from coronavirus outbreak

Thinking about the problems the country is facing from the outbreak, a narrow majority (54%) says they think the worst is still to come, while 45% say the worst is behind us.

Chart shows narrow majority in U.S. says worst of pandemic is still to come

Views are more positive than they were in November 2020 – before COVID-19 vaccines were approved for use in the U.S. – when just 28% of Americans thought the worst was behind us and 71% said the worst was still yet to come.

Republicans and Republican leaners are slightly more optimistic about the state of the outbreak than Democrats and Democratic leaners: 53% of Republicans say the worst is behind us, while 59% of Democrats take the opposing view and think the worst is still to come.

Adults who have received at least one dose of a coronavirus vaccine and those who have not view the state of the coronavirus outbreak in similar terms: 53% of vaccinated and 56% of unvaccinated adults say the worst of the problems from the outbreak are still to come.

The toll of restrictions on public activity are widely felt, but majority in U.S. sees public health benefits as worth the cost

Nearly all adults in the U.S. say that coronavirus-related restrictions on public activity have hurt businesses and economic activity either a lot (69%) or some (26%); just 5% say these restrictions have hurt businesses not too much or not at all.

Chart shows majority of Americans say pandemic restrictions have hurt economy, but think they’ve been worth the costs

Large shares also say restrictions on public activity have kept people from living their lives the way they want either a lot (58%) or some (31%).

Americans are less convinced of how much the restrictions have helped to prevent hospitalizations and deaths from the coronavirus and helped to slow its spread. Majorities say the restrictions have helped at least some in each regard, but only about three-in-ten say they have done a lot to help prevent hospitalizations and deaths from COVID-19 (32%) or slow the spread of the coronavirus (31%).

Nonetheless, when asked to assess the overall impact of the restrictions on public activity, a majority of Americans (62%) say the public health benefits have been worth the costs; significantly fewer (37%) say they have not been worth the costs.

Chart shows small shares of those who are not vaccinated think activity restrictions have helped a lot to prevent illness, slow spread of the coronavirus

Vaccinated adults (those who have received at least one dose of a coronavirus vaccine) are less likely than those who have not received a vaccine to say restrictions on public activity have done a lot to hurt businesses and keep people from living their lives, and they are more likely to say restrictions have done a lot to help prevent serious illnesses and slow the virus’s spread. For example, 40% of vaccinated adults say restrictions have helped a lot to prevent hospitalizations and deaths from the virus, compared with just 12% of unvaccinated adults who say the same.

Chart shows Democrats more likely than Republicans to say public health benefits of restrictions on activity have been worth the costs

These two groups arrive at differing conclusions about the overall impact of the restrictions: 73% of vaccinated adults say the public health benefits of the restrictions have been worth the costs, while 33% of those not vaccinated say this. A majority of those not vaccinated (65%) say the health benefits of the restrictions have not been worth the costs.

There are also wide differences in views of the public health restrictions by partisanship, with Republicans being more likely than Democrats to say the restrictions have had negative impacts, and less likely to say they have helped a lot to prevent severe illnesses and slow the spread of the coronavirus.

Majorities in U.S. back proof of vaccination for air travel, college students

Chart shows majority in U.S. support requiring proof of vaccination for air travel, oppose requiring it to shop in stores

As several cities and businesses around the country have begun requiring customers to show proof of COVID-19 vaccination to do things like eat at restaurants or attend concerts, Americans offer mixed views of these requirements, with opinion ranging from majority support to opposition, depending on the setting.

About six-in-ten Americans (61%) say they favor requiring adults in the U.S. to show proof of COVID-19 vaccination before being allowed to travel by airplane, while 38% would oppose such a requirement. While some U.S. airlines have required their employees to get vaccinated, they have so far stopped short of requiring proof of vaccination from travelers – although some destinations, such as Hawaii, require visitors to either show proof of vaccination or a negative coronavirus test result, or else quarantine for 10 days after arrival.

As the school year begins around the country, just under six-in-ten Americans (57%) say they favor requiring proof of COVID-19 vaccination for students to attend public colleges and universities in person. More than 800 U.S. colleges are requiring vaccinations for students and staff to be on campus, and more are strongly encouraging vaccination.

A narrow majority of adults (56%) also support requiring proof of COVID-19 vaccination in order to attend sporting events or concerts.

The public is evenly split over whether they would support or oppose being made to show proof of vaccination to eat inside of a restaurant. Some cities, such as New York, have required restaurants and bars to ask for proof of vaccination in response to rising infections and hospitalizations.

Chart shows few Republicans favor showing proof of COVID-19 vaccination for shopping or dining indoors

On balance, the public leans against requiring proof of vaccination to shop inside stores and businesses: 54% say they are opposed to this, while 45% support such a requirement.

Partisanship, as well as vaccination status, plays a large role in views about requiring coronavirus vaccines. Majorities of Democrats favor requiring adults to show proof of vaccination before doing all five of the activities included in the survey; by contrast, majorities of Republicans oppose each of these measures.

For example, 77% of Democrats and independents who lean toward the Democratic Party favor requiring those going to a sporting event or concert to show proof of vaccination, while 68% of Republicans and Republican leaners oppose requiring spectators to prove they’ve received a coronavirus vaccine.

Not surprisingly, adults who have not received a vaccine overwhelmingly oppose requiring proof of vaccination in these settings; roughly eight-in-ten or more oppose each of the five activities requiring proof of vaccination. Among those who have received at least one dose of a vaccine, majorities support requiring proof of vaccination, though the level of support varies from 56% for shopping inside stores and businesses to 77% for travel by airplane.

Differences in views by vaccination status exist within partisan groups. Among Republicans and Republican leaners, 55% of vaccinated Republicans favor requiring proof of vaccination for air travel, compared with 12% of unvaccinated Republicans. Just under half of vaccinated Republicans back proof of vaccination for attending events and public colleges and universities (compared with only about 10% of unvaccinated Republicans). However, when it comes to requirements to eat inside restaurants or shop, majorities of Republicans, regardless of vaccination status, oppose having to provide proof of vaccination. (60% of Republicans and Republican leaners are vaccinated; 38% are not.)

Among Democrats and Democratic leaners, differences are even wider, with majorities of vaccinated Democrats in favor of requiring proof of vaccination in all five settings and majorities of unvaccinated Democrats opposed to all five requirements. However, those who have not received a vaccine represent a small share of all Democrats (14%), compared with 38% among Republicans.

Requiring masks on transit, restricting international travel, avoiding large gatherings widely seen as necessary steps to address coronavirus

Chart shows most in U.S. back mask rules on public transit, international travel restrictions to address COVID-19

When asked about policies in place in some areas of the country to address the coronavirus outbreak, 80% of Americans say they think it is necessary to require masks for people traveling on airplanes or public transportation. A similar majority (79%) says it is necessary to restrict international travel to the U.S.

About three-quarters of U.S. adults (73%) also think asking people to avoid gathering in large groups is a necessary step to deal with the outbreak.

The public is closely divided on the necessity of two other policies: limiting restaurants to carry-out only (50% necessary, 50% unnecessary) and closing K-12 schools for in-person learning (48% necessary, 51% unnecessary). In-person learning has recently restarted at most schools around the country – although some schools have had to temporarily revert to remote instruction due to coronavirus outbreaks among students or staff.

The shares of Americans that support each of these measures have stayed relatively stable since the questions were last asked in February 2021.

Chart shows majorities of vaccinated adults see a range of policies to address coronavirus outbreak as necessary

Vaccinated adults (including those who have received one of two vaccine doses) are more likely to see each of these five policies as necessary to address the outbreak than adults who have not received a vaccine.

For instance, 82% of vaccinated Americans think it is necessary to ask people to avoid gathering in large groups. About half of unvaccinated adults (49%) say this policy is necessary, while 51% say it is unnecessary.

Chart shows Republicans less likely than Democrats to view policies in place to address coronavirus as necessary

There also are wide differences in views of policies aimed at addressing the coronavirus outbreak by partisanship, with Democrats expressing significantly more support for each policy than Republicans.

However, the magnitude of the partisan gap varies by policy.

For instance, majorities of Democrats (85%) and Republicans (73%) say it’s necessary to restrict international travel to the U.S. in order to address the coronavirus outbreak (a 12-point partisan gap).

By contrast, Democrats are far more likely than Republicans to say it is necessary to limit restaurants to carry-out only (68% vs 26%) and to close K-12 schools for in-person learning (67% vs. 25%).

Decline in share of U.S. adults who report frequent mask wearing

Chart shows sharp decline in frequent mask wearing among Republicans since February

Public health guidance on mask wearing has changed over the course of the outbreak, and policies requiring masks – or preventing mask requirements – have varied widely at the state and local level.

In the current survey, 53% of adults say that in the past month they have worn a mask or face covering all or most of the time when in stores and businesses; 21% say they have worn one some of the time and 25% say they’ve worn a mask in these public places hardly ever or never.

The share of U.S. adults who say they’ve been wearing a mask all or most of the time is down 35 points since February, when mask mandates were more widely in place around the country than they are today. The decline in frequent mask wearing has been much greater among Republicans (down 53 points) than among Democrats (down 22 points). In February, there was a modest partisan divide on this question as large majorities of both Republicans (83%) and Democrats (93%) said they had been wearing a mask all or most of the time in public. Today, the partisan gap has grown dramatically to 41 points as Democrats are now far more likely than Republicans to report wearing a mask all or most of the time when in stores and businesses (71% vs. 30%).

Chart shows vaccinated adults report wearing a mask more often than those who have not received a COVID-19 vaccine

Vaccinated adults are significantly more likely than those who have not received a COVID-19 vaccine to report frequently wearing a mask in public places.

About six-in-ten (59%) of those who have received at least one dose of a vaccine say they have been wearing a mask all or most of the time in stores and businesses over the last month. A much smaller share (37%) of those who have not received a COVID-19 vaccine report this level of mask wearing; 45% of this group say they have been wearing a mask in stores and businesses hardly ever or never in the last month.

There is a strong link between personal concern about getting a serious case of the coronavirus and mask wearing. Eight-in-ten of those who are very concerned about getting the coronavirus and requiring hospitalization say they’ve been wearing a mask all or most of the time in stores and businesses. The share who report frequent mask wearing falls to 64% among those who are somewhat concerned about getting a serious case of the coronavirus and to 38% among those who are not too or not at all about getting the coronavirus and requiring hospitalization.

Mask-wearing habits also differ significantly by the type of community where people live. Nearly seven-in-ten adults who live in urban areas (68%) say they’ve been wearing a mask all or most of the time in stores and businesses, compared with 51% of those in suburban areas and 42% of those in rural areas.

58% of Americans express concern about unknowingly spreading the coronavirus

Chart shows majority of Americans remain concerned about unknowingly spreading the coronavirus to others

A majority of Americans say they are either very (27%) or somewhat (32%) concerned that they might spread the coronavirus to other people without knowing that they have it. A smaller share (45%) say they are very (19%) or somewhat (26%) concerned that they will get the coronavirus and require hospitalization.

Concern over getting and unknowingly spreading the coronavirus has gradually edged lower since the start of the pandemic. In April 2020, 66% of U.S. adults were at least somewhat concerned about unknowingly spreading the coronavirus (including 33% who were very concerned); at that time, 55% were at least somewhat concerned about getting a serious case themselves (24% very concerned).

Chart shows vaccinated adults more concerned about spreading coronavirus than those who have not been vaccinated

There are wide differences in levels of concern over getting and spreading the coronavirus by vaccination status as well as by other characteristics such as party affiliation and race and ethnicity.

About two-thirds of vaccinated adults are very (31%) or somewhat (35%) concerned about unknowingly spreading COVID-19 to others. Half are at least somewhat concerned about getting a serious case themselves. By contrast, among those who have not received a vaccine, fewer than half express concern about unknowingly spreading the coronavirus (38%) or getting a serious case themselves (32%), including relatively small shares who say they are very concerned about this (16% and 13%, respectively).

Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents are far more likely than Republicans and Republican leaners to say they are very or somewhat concerned about spreading the coronavirus to other people without knowing they have it (76% vs. 38%) and to say they are concerned about getting a serious case of the coronavirus themselves (56% vs. 30%).

White adults are much less likely than Black, Hispanic and English-speaking Asian adults to express concern over spreading the coronavirus or getting the coronavirus and requiring hospitalization. Eight-in-ten English-speaking Asian adults, 73% of Hispanic adults and 65% of Black adults say they are very or somewhat concerned about unknowingly spreading the coronavirus to others, compared with 52% of White adults.

Among White adults, Democrats are far more likely than Republicans to express concern about getting or spreading COVID-19. For instance, nearly three-quarters of White Democrats (74%) say they are very or somewhat concerned about unknowingly spreading the coronavirus, compared with 35% of White Republicans. (Overall, larger shares of White adults than Black, Hispanic and English-speaking Asian adults identify with or lean toward the Republican Party.)

About seven-in-ten Americans have at least a fair amount of confidence in COVID-19 vaccine research and development process

Chart shows strong confidence in vaccine research and development process increases

Strong confidence in the vaccine research and development process has risen steadily over the past year. The share saying they have a great deal of confidence that the research and development process has produced safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines has increased 20 percentage points (to 39%) over the past year and is up 6 points since February.

A majority of Americans (72%) continue to say they have at least a fair amount of confidence that the research and development process has produced safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines.

As with earlier Center surveys, levels of confidence in the COVID-19 vaccine research and development process are strongly tied to vaccination status. Nearly all of those who have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine (91%) say they have at least a fair amount of confidence in the vaccine R&D process, including 52% who say they have a great deal of confidence.

Chart shows vaccinated adults highly confident in COVID-19 vaccine R&D process

By contrast, only 21% of those who are not vaccinated say they have at least a fair amount of confidence in the vaccine R&D process (including just 3% who have a great deal of confidence).

A larger majority of Democrats than Republicans say they have at least a fair amount of confidence in the vaccine research and development process (86% vs. 55%). Among Democrats, 54% express a great deal of confidence (just 22% of Republicans say the same).

Americans who are vaccinated and not vaccinated see COVID-19 vaccines in starkly different lights

The development of COVID-19 vaccines and their uptake among the U.S. public are the center of the public health strategy to combat the coronavirus outbreak.

Chart shows positive sentiment toward vaccines – as well as some concerns – resonate with majorities of U.S. adults

When asked how well various statements about coronavirus vaccines describe them, the public expresses a mix of positive and negative sentiments. Overall, 73% of adults say that the statement “vaccines are the best way to protect Americans from COVID-19” describes their own views very or somewhat well; 27% say it describes their views not too or not at all well. A majority (60%) also say the statement “people who choose not to get a COVID-19 vaccine are hurting the country” describes their views at least somewhat well.

At the same time, sizable shares of the public express concerns regarding COVID-19 vaccines. About six-in-ten (61%) say the statement “we don’t really know yet if there are serious health risks from COVID-19 vaccines” describes their views very or somewhat well.

When it comes to information about vaccines, 54% align with the statement “public health officials are not telling us everything they know about COVID-19 vaccines,” and 55% say that “it’s hard to make sense of all the information about COVID-19 vaccines” describes their views well.

The public is about evenly split over the statement “there is too much pressure on Americans to get a COVID-19 vaccine”: 51% say this describes their views very or somewhat well, while 48% say it describes how they feel not too or not at all well.

Chart shows 91% of vaccinated adults see COVID-19 vaccines as the best way to protect Americans from COVID-19; those not vaccinated cite a range of concerns

Vaccinated adults are much more likely than those who are not vaccinated to say the sentiment that vaccines are the best way to protect Americans from COVID-19 describes them at least somewhat well (91% vs. 23%). There is a similarly large gap when it comes to expressing alignment with that view that people who choose not to get vaccinated are hurting the country (77% vs. 13%).

However, even among those who are vaccinated, some concerns about COVID-19 vaccines resonate: 54% of vaccinated adults say the statement “we don’t really know yet if there are serious health risks from COVID-19 vaccines” describes their views very or somewhat well. Taken together, 70% of vaccinated adults express alignment with at least one of four sentiments of confusion or concern about COVID-19 vaccines.

Those who have not received a COVID-19 vaccine are less likely to express cross-cutting attitudes about vaccines. Fewer than 25% say they are described at least somewhat well by the statements that vaccines are the best way to protect Americans from COVID-19 and that people who choose not to get a COVID-19 vaccine are hurting the country.

Vaccination status also matters within partisan coalitions when assessing views toward vaccines. Among Republicans who have received a vaccine, 83% say the statement “vaccines are the best way to protect Americans from COVID-19” describes their views very or somewhat well, and 56% say this about the statement “people who choose not to get a COVID-19 vaccine are hurting the country.” Republicans who have not received a vaccine express very low levels of alignment with these two statements. (Six-in-ten Republicans and Republican leaners have received at least one dose of a vaccine, while 38% have not.)

Chart shows Republicans’ views on COVID-19 vaccines differ by vaccination status

More than half of Republicans, regardless of vaccination status, say each of the four statements of confusion or concern regarding vaccines describes their views well, though larger majorities of unvaccinated than vaccinated Republicans express alignment with these statements.

There also are differences in these views by vaccination status among Democrats, with vaccinated Democrats more likely than unvaccinated Democrats to say they’re described well by positive sentiments toward vaccines; the opposite pattern is seen for sentiments expressing confusion or concern. However, unvaccinated adults make up a relatively small share of all Democrats and Democratic leaners: Just 14% of Democrats say they have not received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine.

Fewer than half think businesses should require vaccines for employees, but a majority think they should at least encourage it

Chart shows about four-in-ten Americans say businesses should require employees to get a COVID-19 vaccine

Asked to think about workplaces and COVID-19 vaccines, 39% of the public says most businesses should require their employees to get a vaccine, while another 35% say businesses should encourage employees to get a COVID-19 vaccine, but not require it. A quarter of the public says employers should neither require nor encourage employees to get vaccinated.

Views on this question differ only modestly by employment status. And among adults under 50, the same share of those employed and not employed say most businesses should require workers to get a vaccine (34%).

A majority of Democrats (59%) say most businesses should require employees to get a COVID-19 vaccine, compared with 17% of Republicans.

Those with higher levels of education are more likely to favor a vaccination requirement. Adults with a postgraduate education are 20 points more likely than those with high school or less education to support requirements (55% vs. 35%).

Most vaccinated adults are open to getting a COVID-19 booster shot

Chart shows majority of vaccinated adults say they would get a COVID-19 booster shot, if recommended

The share of the adult public that says they’ve received at least one dose of a vaccine for COVID-19 rose dramatically between February and June of this year (from 19% to 67%), as vaccines became more widely available. Since June, the share of adults who say they’ve received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine has increased 6 points to 73%.

In recent weeks the Food and Drug Administration has approved booster shots – an additional dose of a COVID-19 vaccine – for people with weakened immune systems, and the FDA and CDC continue to evaluate the potential need for booster shots among the general public.

Adults who have already received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine express broad openness to receiving a booster shot. A large majority of vaccinated adults (62% of the total public) say they would probably get a vaccine booster, if public health officials recommend an additional dose. A far smaller share of vaccinated adults (10% of the total public) say they would probably not get a vaccine booster.

Divides over vaccines play out among family and friends

Adults who have received a COVID-19 vaccine and those who have not report distinctly different input from their friends and family when it comes to the vaccination decision.

Chart shows input on vaccine from friends and family differs greatly by vaccination status and partisanship

A majority of vaccinated adults (59%) say their close friends and family have mostly encouraged them to get a coronavirus vaccine. Just 3% of vaccinated adults say their close friends and family have mostly discouraged them from doing this; 26% say the input has been mixed and 12% say they haven’t heard much from friends and family about vaccines.

By contrast, among those who have not received a COVID-19 vaccine, just 11% say their close friends and family have mostly encouraged them to get a coronavirus vaccine; another 11% say they have been mostly discouraged by friends and family from getting a vaccine. Among those who have not been vaccinated, about half (49%) describe the input from their close friends and family as mixed, with some encouraging them to get a vaccine and some discouraging them from doing so; 28% say their close friends and family haven’t said much about vaccines.

There are also wide differences on this question by partisanship. Six-in-ten Democrats and Democratic leaners say their close friends and family have mostly encouraged them to get a vaccine, while 25% say they’ve received mixed input and just 4% say they’ve mostly been discouraged from getting a vaccine.

Republicans and Republican leaners are much less likely than Democrats and Democratic leaners to say their close friends and family have mostly encouraged them to get a coronavirus vaccine (31% vs. 60%). Among Republicans, 40% say the input they received from close friends and family has been mixed, while 22% say their friends and family haven’t said much. Relatively few (7%) say they’ve mostly been discouraged from getting a vaccine.

Americans hold mixed reactions to changing public health guidance during the coronavirus outbreak

Chart shows majority of Americans say shifting public health recommendations on the coronavirus made sense, but 63% also say they’ve had a negative reaction

Over the course of the outbreak, public health guidance on how to deal with the coronavirus has changed, including information on core concepts such as how the coronavirus spreads and how effective masks are at limiting the spread of the virus.

Americans express a mix of both positive and negative reactions when asked how this changing guidance has made them feel.

A majority (61%) says changes to public health recommendations since the start of the outbreak made sense because scientific knowledge is always being updated. About half (51%) say the changing guidance reassured them that public health officials are staying on top of new information.

At the same time, the public also expresses negative reactions: 55% say the changing guidance made them wonder if public health officials were holding back important information, and 51% say these changes made them feel less confident in public health officials’ recommendations. Taken together, 63% of U.S. adults express at least one of two negative reactions to changing public health guidance.

Confusion was also a reaction experienced by just over half of adults: 53% say changing recommendations over the course of the outbreak made them feel confused.

Chart shows large shares of those who are not vaccinated express negative reactions to changing public health guidance

There are wide differences in reactions to changing guidance from public health officials by vaccination status and partisan affiliation.

U.S. adults who have not been vaccinated against COVID-19 are far more likely to express negative reactions to changes in guidance from public health officials than vaccinated adults. Large majorities of those who are not vaccinated say changing recommendations made them wonder if public health officials were holding back important information (78%) and say it made them feel less confident in public health officials’ recommendations (75%). Fewer than half of vaccinated adults express either of these two sentiments (47% and 43%, respectively).

Those who have been vaccinated are far more likely than those who have not to say changes to recommendations made sense because scientific knowledge is always being updated (72% vs. 32%).

There are comparably large differences by partisan affiliation in reactions to changes in public health recommendations, with Democrats more likely to express positive feelings and Republicans more likely to express negative reactions. For instance, Democrats are 41 points more likely than Republicans to say changes in recommendations made sense because scientific knowledge is always being updated (80% vs. 39%). When it comes to negative reactions, Republicans are 35 points more likely than Democrats to say that changing guidance made them wonder if public health officials were holding back important information (74% vs. 39%). But Democrats do not express exclusively positive responses to shifts in public health recommendations: 47% say they’ve experienced at least one of the two negative reactions to changing guidance, and 44% say they’ve felt confused.

Higher educational attainment is also connected with more positive reactions to changing health guidance. For example, about three-quarters of Americans with a postgraduate degree (76%) say changing guidance made sense because scientific understanding is always being updated. This compares with 66% of college graduates, 59% of those with some college experience and 54% of those with a high school diploma or less education. Educational differences occur on this question among both Republicans and Democrats.

Those with lower levels of education are especially likely to express negative reactions to changing guidance: For instance, 60% of those with a high school diploma or less and 58% of those with some college say changing recommendations about how to slow the spread of the coronavirus made them wonder if health officials were holding back important information; this view is less widely held among college graduates (50%) and postgraduates (41%).

However, there is little difference across levels of education in having felt confused by changing guidance from public health officials, with between 49% and 55% of all groups expressing this view. See the Appendix for details.

Majority of Americans know someone who has been hospitalized or died from COVID-19

Chart shows 82% of Black adults say they know someone who has been hospitalized or died from COVID-19

More than 600,000 Americans have died as a result of COVID-19, and millions have been hospitalized from the disease. In the current survey, 72% of U.S. adults say they personally know someone who has been hospitalized or died as a result of having COVID-19.

As has been the case throughout the outbreak, Black (82%) and Hispanic (78%) adults are especially likely to say they know someone who has been hospitalized or died as a result of the coronavirus. Majorities of White (70%) and English-speaking Asian adults (64%) also say they know someone who has been hospitalized or died.

Across other major demographic groups, there are modest or no differences in the shares who say they know someone who has been hospitalized or died as a result of COVID-19. Democrats and Republicans are about equally likely to say this (74% and 71%, respectively); there is a modest difference in this experience between adults who have received a COVID-19 vaccine and those who have not (74% vs. 68%).

A year and a half into the coronavirus outbreak in the U.S., three-in-ten U.S. adults say they have tested positive for COVID-19 or been “pretty sure” they had it.

Chart shows 72% of U.S. adults say they know someone who has been hospitalized or died as a result of COVID-19

There are differences by age, race and ethnicity, income and partisan affiliation when it comes to having had COVID-19. Younger Americans are more likely than their older counterparts to say they have had the coronavirus. Those ages 18 to 29 are about twice as likely as those 65 and older to report they tested positive or were “pretty sure” they had COVID-19 (36% vs. 17%).

Hispanic adults (39%) are more likely than Black (29%), White (28%) or Asian (21%) adults to say they have had COVID-19.

One-third of adults with lower incomes say they have tested positive for COVID-19 or been pretty sure they had it, compared with 24% of upper-income adults.

Republicans are modestly more likely than Democrats to say they have had COVID-19 (35% vs 27%).

Few Americans know access to vaccines is limited in developing countries

Chart shows 26% of Americans aware ‘very few’ adults in developing countries have access to COVID-19 vaccines

Many developing countries continue to have a low supply of COVID-19 vaccines, with small shares of their populations currently vaccinated. In African countries, for instance, it is estimated that just about 3% of the adult population has received a COVID-19 vaccination.

Asked about the status of COVID-19 vaccines in developing countries, about a quarter of Americans (26%) correctly say that very few adults in developing countries can currently get a vaccine, if they want one. Roughly four-in-ten Americans (42%) say that about half or most adults in developing countries have access to COVID-19 vaccines, while 32% say they aren’t sure.

Chart shows 26% of Americans say providing COVID-19 vaccines to developing countries should be a top priority

When asked about the U.S. role in the global distribution of vaccines, about three-quarters of Americans (76%) say providing COVID-19 vaccines to developing countries should be at least an important priority, though only 26% of U.S. adults say it’s a “top” priority. About a quarter (23%) say this should be a lower priority or should not be done at all.

Those who are vaccinated are more likely to favor providing large numbers of vaccines to developing countries, a pattern that holds among both Republicans and Democrats. Overall, Democrats place a higher priority on providing vaccines to developing countries than Republicans.

Americans who are aware that most people in developing countries do not have access to COVID-19 vaccines, and those who see COVID-19 as a major threat to public health in the U.S., are relatively more likely to prioritize providing COVID-19 vaccines to developing countries.

Chart shows among those who say U.S. should provide COVID-19 vaccines to developing countries, most say this should be done to limit variant spread in U.S.

Infectious disease researchers have argued that countries with low vaccination rates are more likely to develop new coronavirus variants. Reducing the risk of new coronavirus variants spreading to the country is seen as the main reason why the U.S. should provide vaccines to developing countries (among those who give this at least some level of priority).

Among the 90% of adults who say providing vaccines to developing countries is a top, important or lower priority, 72% say the main reason to do this is to reduce the risk of new variants spreading to the U.S. About two-in-ten (17%) say the main reason to do this is because the U.S. has an obligation to help people around the world get vaccinated.

About one-in-ten (9%) volunteer another rationale for why the U.S. should provide vaccines to developing countries. Common volunteered responses include that both reducing the risk of variants and a U.S. obligation to help are equally important reasons, that providing vaccines is the humanitarian choice, and that the U.S. should provide vaccines due to the country’s excess supply.

Republicans grow more skeptical that scientists base judgments solely on the facts

Chart shows Democrats and Republicans move further apart in views on scientists’ ability to be unbiased

Americans are closely divided over whether scientists’ judgments are based solely on the facts or are just as likely to be biased as other people’s. In the current survey, 54% say scientists’ judgments are based solely on the facts, compared with 45% who think scientists’ judgments are just as likely to be biased as those of other people. These overall views are about the same as they were in 2019, the last time this question was asked.

However, Democrats have become more likely – and Republicans less likely – to say scientists’ judgments are based solely on the facts over the past two years. About three-in-ten Republicans and Republican leaners (31%) now say scientists’ judgments are based solely on the facts, down 13 percentage points since 2019. About seven-in-ten (68%) Republicans think scientists’ judgments are just as likely to be biased as those of other people.

Among Democrats and Democratic leaners, 73% say scientists’ judgments are based solely on the facts, up 11 points since 2019. The partisan gap in the share saying scientists’ judgments are based solely on the facts is now 42 points, much larger than the 18-point gap seen in 2019.

Recent Center surveys have also found growing political divides in confidence in scientists and views of the effect of science on society.

About seven-in-ten Americans see the scientific method as an iterative process

The survey also looked at Americans’ understanding of the scientific process. About seven-in-ten U.S. adults (71%) say the scientific method is an iterative process, with findings that are meant to be continually tested and updated, while 9% say the scientific method produces unchanging core principles and truths; 20% say they aren’t sure.

Chart shows most Americans describe the scientific method as an iterative process

The share of Americans who see the scientific method as iterative is up slightly from November 2020 when 66% said this.

Americans with higher levels of education are more likely to say the scientific method produces findings meant to be continually tested and updated. About nine-in-ten (88%) of those with a postgraduate degree say this, compared with just 56% of those with a high school diploma or less. There are large educational differences on this question among both Democrats and Republicans.

(PEW)

SEPTEMBER 15, 2021

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/science/2021/09/15/majority-in-u-s-says-public-health-benefits-of-covid-19-restrictions-worth-the-costs-even-as-large-shares-also-see-downsides/

 

708-43-10/Polls

Simone Biles Was Mentioned In More Than 650,000 Tweets, Or 31% Of The Total

Although gymnast Simone Biles’ medal count fell slightly short of the sports world’s lofty expectations in the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games, she dominated among U.S. Olympians in the number of times her handle, @Simone_Biles, was mentioned on Twitter.

Pew Research Center captured the Twitter handles of every athlete who listed a profile on the official Team USA page and looked at tweets from the broader Twitter audience that directly mentioned those handles during the Games. Here are some key takeaways for how the public engaged with Team USA on Twitter.

Twitter users directly mentioned the accounts of U.S. Olympians more than 2.1 million times during the Games

All told, 598 athletes were listed on the Team USA website at the start of the Games. And 438 of them (73% of the total) included a Twitter handle in their athlete profile. From July 21 through Aug. 9, 2021 – the Games themselves, postponed from the year before, were held July 23 to Aug. 8 – more than 900,000 different Twitter accounts directly mentioned the handles of U.S. Olympians in more than 2.1 million tweets. The vast majority (90%) of those athlete accounts were mentioned at least once during that time.

These mentions were especially concentrated on a few key dates. Nearly a third (31%) of all athlete mentions occurred during the three days of July 27-29, a period that included the women’s team and individual gymnastics finals and swimmer Katie Ledecky winning the gold medal in the 1,500-meter freestyle.

Simone Biles alone made up 31% of all mentions of U.S. Olympians

A chart showing that Simone Biles was mentioned in 31% of all tweets referencing handles of U.S. Olympians during the Tokyo Games

One athlete in particular – gymnast Simone Biles – stood out above all others in the number of times she was mentioned by the Twitter audience. Of the more than 2.1 million tweets that mentioned the handle of any U.S. Olympians during the Games, @Simone_Biles was referenced in more than 650,000 tweets, or 31% of the total. Biles was even more omnipresent from July 27-29, when her handle accounted for 64% of all athlete mentions. (It’s worth noting that many individual tweets mentioned multiple athletes.)

Mentions of Biles included expressions of support as well as discussion of her withdrawal from competition

Original tweets and replies mentioning Biles’ handle during the Games tended to disproportionately use certain terms and phrases relative to tweets that mentioned other Olympians. Many of these terms appear to be in reference to Biles’ decision to withdraw from competition in some events.

Some of the most distinctive terms included supportive phrases like “love [and] support,” “courage” and “brave.” Other phrases (such as “quitter” or “quitting”) referenced her withdrawal in a more negative light, while others referred to issues like “mental health” and “abuse.”

These terms were up to 52 times more prevalent in tweets mentioning Biles than in those mentioning other athletes. Even so, these “distinctive” terms were relatively rare. For instance, just 4% of original tweets that tagged @Simone_Biles directly used the terms “quit,” “quitter” or “quitting.”

Nearly 80% of athlete mentions referenced members of the gymnastics, basketball, and track and field teams

A pie chart showing that nearly 80% of Twitter mentions of U.S. Olympians referenced athletes in gymnastics, basketball, track and field

The Twitter handles collected from the Team USA website included athletes from 32 different sports. But just three of those sports – gymnastics, basketball, and track and field – produced the vast majority of individual athlete mentions on Twitter. Athletes from these three sports accounted for 79% of all mentions of U.S. Olympians during the Games, while athletes from the other 29 sports accounted for just 21% of all mentions.

A majority of tweets mentioning U.S. Olympians offered no original commentary: 62% were direct retweets, often of tweets posted by athletes themselves. The remaining tweets included replies in which the poster included an athlete’s handle (18%), original tweets (14%) and direct replies to tweets from the accounts of Team USA members (7%).

Other frequently mentioned athletes included Kevin Durant, Sunisa Lee

A table showing that ten Team USA members made up 62% of all athlete mentions on Twitter during 2020 Games

In addition to Biles, a small group of prominent athletes accounted for a significant share of mentions of all U.S. Olympian handles during the Games. The 10 most-mentioned handles accounted for 62% of all individual athlete mentions. The most-mentioned athletes tended to be drawn from the most-mentioned sports – specifically gymnastics (Biles and Sunisa Lee), basketball (Kevin Durant, Draymond Green, Damian Lillard, A’ja Wilson and Devin Booker) and track and field (Allyson Felix). But they also included a soccer player (Megan Rapinoe) and swimmer (Ledecky).

The 10 most-mentioned athletes included six women and four men. All four male athletes are professional NBA basketball players. But the most-mentioned women come from a variety of sports: gymnastics, basketball, swimming, track and field, and soccer.

(PEW)

SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/09/16/simone-biles-by-far-the-most-mentioned-team-usa-athlete-on-twitter-during-tokyo-olympics/

 

708-43-11/Polls

Canadians Increasingly Worried About Covid-19 Variants (88%, +7), Fourth Wave (71%, +2)

Toronto, ON, September 13, 2021 — As Canada continues through the fourth wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, Canadians remain worried about what the COVID-19 variants might mean for getting back to normal but are somewhat more accepting of the idea of living with the virus into the fall.

A recent Ipsos poll on conducted on behalf of Global News finds that Canadians are more worried about the fourth wave than they were when it was only a possibility (71%, +2) and are especially more concerned about COVID-19 variants delaying things getting back to normal (88%, +7). Furthermore, Canadians are now less likely to agree that the spread of less-serious COVID-19 cases is acceptable in order to live without restrictions (52%, -4), which could include mask or distancing mandates. Given the growing level of worry about COVID-19 and its impact on the country, it is no surprise that 68% of Canadians also agree that we should not be holding an election during a pandemic,[1] which has seen a 10-point increase since the end of August.[2]

Despite this, more Canadians feel we should learn to live with active COVID-19 cases as long as hospitals are not overwhelmed (70%, +3) and support for lockdown measures in light of the fourth wave has decreased (63%, -6). Taken together, this suggests that, overall, Canadians are approaching what could be considered the ever-discussed “new normal.”

 

 

July 2021

September 2021

The spread of less-serious COVID-19 cases is acceptable in order to live without restrictions

56%

52% (-4)

I would support more lockdown measures if there is/in light of the fourth wave of COVID-19

69%

63% (-6)

We should learn to live with active COVID-19 cases as long as hospitals aren’t overwhelmed

67%

70% (+3)

I am worried about the [potential of] fourth wave of the pandemic

69%

71% (+2)

I am worried that new COVID-19 variants will delay things getting back to normal

81%

88% (+7)

 

While just over half (53%) of Canadians agree that the fourth wave will be worse than the others, there remains another nearly half of Canadians who do not feel the fourth wave will be worse. Just over one-third of Canadians agree that people are overreacting about the fourth wave of the pandemic (37%).

That said, there are key demographic differences and variance by vote intention when it comes to these issues. Younger Canadians are more likely to agree that the spread of less-serious COVID-19 cases is acceptable in order to live without restrictions (59% 18-34, 55% 35-54, 44% 55+). In fact, those aged 55+ are more worried than those under 55 when it comes to the fourth wave (81% 55+. 68% 35-54, 60% 18-34) variants delaying things getting back to normal (93% 55+. 87% 35-54, 82% 18-34), and the fourth wave being worse than the previous waves (60% 55+. 51% 35-54, 46% 18-34). Older Canadians are also significantly more likely to support further lockdowns (69% 55+. 61% 35-54, 57% 18-34).

Consistent with polling in July, those from BC (81%) and Atlantic Canada (75%) remain the most supportive of lockdown measures in light of the fourth wave (65% SK/MB, 64% ON, 57% AB, 49% QC). Those from Quebec appear to be most in favour of opening back up and least worried: they are significantly more likely than those in other regions to feel we should learn to live with active cases (81%, compared to 73% AB, 72% ATL, 68% SK/MB, 67% ON, 58% BC) and to feel people are overreacting about the fourth wave (48%, compared to 41% AB, 36% ON, 35% SK/MB, 31% ATL, 27% BC), continuing a trend of optimism among this group seen in Ipsos research throughout this year.

Conservative Voters More Comfortable with Living with COVID

Conservative voters are more likely to feel that the spread of less-serious cases in order to live without restrictions is acceptable (60%). In fact, Conservatives are, overall, more supportive of learning to live with active cases as long as hospitals are not overwhelmed (77%), and more likely to feel people are overreacting about the fourth wave (44%). By contrast, Liberal and NDP voters appear more worried overall, and are less supportive of learning to live with active cases or the spread of less-serious COVID-19 cases. In particular, NDP voters are least likely to see living with active cases as an acceptable future (55%) and are most worried about the variants delaying things getting back to normal (94%). Given the tight race between Conservative and Liberal federal parties, it remains to be seen whether the outcome of the election will mark a dramatic change in the handling of the pandemic.

 

Agreement by Stated Vote Intention

 

Overall

Conservative

Liberal

NDP

BQ

Green

The spread of less-serious COVID-19 cases is acceptable in order to live without restrictions

52%

60%

45%

43%

48%

82%

I would support more lockdown measures if there is/in light of the fourth wave of COVID-19

63%

53%

77%

78%

48%

57%

We should learn to live with active COVID-19 cases as long as hospitals aren’t overwhelmed

70%

77%

66%

55%

83%

70%

I am worried about the [potential of] fourth wave of the pandemic

71%

64%

83%

81%

67%

62%

I am worried that new COVID-19 variants will delay things getting back to normal

88%

87%

82%

94%

85%

77%

People are overreacting about the fourth wave of the pandemic

37%

44%

29%

23%

41%

37%

The fourth wave of the pandemic will be worse than the previous waves

53%

42%

62%

63%

47%

58%

 

(Ipsos Canada)

13 September 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-ca/news-polls/canadians-increasingly-worried-covid-variants-fourth-wave

 

708-43-12/Polls

Dead Heat Down The Home Stretch: In Final Days Of Campaign, Liberals (32%, Unchanged) And Tories (32%, -3) Are Neck And Neck While NDP (21%, Unchanged) Vote Holds Steady

Toronto, ON, Sep 15, 2021 — As we enter the final days of the federal election campaign, the Liberals and Conservatives are in a dead heat, according to a new Ipsos poll conducted on behalf of Global News. The momentum that the Conservatives have enjoyed throughout most of the race has been halted and even somewhat reversed (down 3 points), while support for the NDP and Liberals has held steady.

If the election were held tomorrow, the Conservatives and the Liberals would both receive 32% of the decided national popular vote, while the NDP would receive 21% of the vote. On a national basis, the Bloc would receive 7% of the vote (unchanged), (32% of the vote within Quebec), while the Green Party (4%, +2) and PPC (3%, +1) would receive a smaller share of the vote. One percent (1%, +1) would vote for some other party, and 4% would not vote. One in ten (11%, -1) Canadians remain undecided.

A federal election is not one national race, but rather a series of regional races.  In each of the seat-rich regions of the country, the vote is razor thin:

  • In Ontario, the Liberals (37%) have only a slight lead over the Conservatives (33%), a lead which is half what the Liberals enjoyed on Election Night in 2019. The NDP (21%) is competitive within the province, while the PPC (5%), Green (4%) and other parties (1%) are further behind.
  • In Quebec, the Liberals (33%) and Bloc (32%) remain entangled, while the Conservatives (23%) are also showing a decent amount of strength within the province. The NDP (7%), Greens (3%) and others (2%) are well behind.
  • In British Columbia, a three-way tie among the NDP (31%), Liberals (29%) and Conservatives (28%) persists, while the PPC (6%), Greens (4%) and others (2%) trail.
  • In Alberta, the Tory (48%) lead over the NDP (27%), Liberals (18%), Greens (5%), PPC (1%) and others (1%) remains strong.
  • In Saskatchewan and Manitoba, the Conservatives (42%) also have a strong lead over the Liberals (24%), NDP (22%), PPC (6%), Greens (4%) and others (2%).
  • In Atlantic Canada, the Liberals (36%) and NDP (34%) lead the Conservatives (25%), while the Green Party (5%) is well behind in the region.

The close race is also reflected in the key age and gender demographic groups studied:

  • Among women, the Liberals (32%) have a slight advantage over the Conservatives (29%) and NDP (24%), while the Bloc (6%), Greens (5%), PPC (4%) and others (1%) are behind.
  • Among men, the Conservatives (35%) have a small lead over the Liberals (32%), while the NDP (18%), Bloc (8%), Greens (3%), PPC (3%) and others (1%) lag.
  • Among those aged 55+, the Liberals (35%) and Conservatives (35%) are tied, while the NDP (13%), Bloc (11%), Greens (3%), PPC (2%) and others (1%) trail.
  • Among those aged 35-54, the Liberals (34%) have the edge over the Tories (30%), NDP (23%), Bloc (5%), Greens (4%), PPC (4%) and others (<1%).
  • Among those aged 18-34, the NDP (30%) have the lead over the Tories (28%), Liberals (25%), Greens (6%), Bloc (4%), PPC (4%) and others (3%).

A majority (53%) of Canadians say they’re absolutely certain about their vote choice or that they’ve already voted, up 4 points since last week. Bloc (61%), and Conservative (58%) supporters are most likely to be committed to their vote choice, while Liberal (55%), PPC (53%), Green (45%) and NDP (44%) voters are less certain of their choice.

With vote intentions for the Liberals holding steady, it’s not surprising to see that approval ratings of the Prime Minister’s performance are also unchanged. Fewer than half (45%, -1 since last week) of Canadians approve (11% strongly/34% somewhat) of the performance of the Liberal government, while just over half (55%, +1) disapprove. Mirroring these figures, 45% believe things in Canada are heading in the right direction (down 3 points since the start of the election campaign), while 54% believe things are off on the wrong track (up 4 points). One percent (1%) is undecided.

Moreover, four in ten (38%) believe that the Liberal government under Justin Trudeau has done a good job and deserves re-election (unchanged since last week), while 60% (down 2 points) believe that it’s time for another party to take over in Ottawa. Two percent (2%) don’t know or refused to say either way.

(Ipsos Canada)

15 September 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-ca/news-polls/liberals-and-tories-are-neck-and-neck-while-ndp-vote-holds-steady

 

708-43-13/Polls

67% Of Gen Z In Canada Is “Certain” They Will Vote In This Election

Toronto, ON, September 15, 2021 — According to Statistics Canada, 7.3 million people were born between 1993 and 2011.[1] Generation Z[2], as they are colloquially known, will become Canada’s largest generation and with more Gen Zers turning 18 every day they will become Canada’s largest voting block. Ipsos polling shows that at least a quarter of this generation who will be eligible to vote in this election did not vote in 2019, likely as they were not yet eligible voters. This means that for many the 44th federal election will be their first opportunity to vote since coming of age. And if Gen Z is to be believed, they will be voting: 67% of Gen Z is “certain” they will vote in this election, an improvement from 2019 when only 52% of eligible Gen Zers voted.[3]  Using the most recent polling carried out exclusively for Global News, Ipsos takes a closer look at the political preferences of Gen Z Canadians during the 2021 federal election campaign.

Gen Z- the Strategic Voter

During an election campaign, especially one where parties are polling so closely, we often hear discussion of “voting strategically”. While young people are often characterized by their optimism and to some extent their naiveté, Ipsos polling shows that Gen Z voters are in fact considering their votes strategically. The idea behind strategic voting is that you set aside your ideals and vote for someone who has the best chance to win, thereby holding at bay the person you really don’t want to become Prime Minister.

Gen Z is considering voting strategically this election cycle: four in ten (41%) say they will vote for a candidate they think could win but is not their first choice, compared to 25% of the general population who says the same thing. Who is the candidate Gen Z thinks could win? It seems many have not decided or are waffling on their decision: 10% of Gen Z are undecided voters. Even among those who provided a preferred party, 68% aren’t absolutely certain that their stated party is who they’ll actually vote for. Their desire to vote strategically coupled with the fact that many Gen Zers remain undecided makes them prime targets for campaign advertisement and thus far Gen Zers have been swayed: a third (28%) say that campaign announcements made so far have changed their intended vote, higher than the 16% average. In the 2019 Federal Election, a quarter (26%) of Gen Z voters said they decided their votes in the last week of the campaign, meaning that it is now or never for parties and leaders to make their appeal to this generation. So how will this all play out in the 2021?

Gen Z Wants to Vote Green, But Likely Won’t

The foundation of strategic voting is that who you want to vote for is not necessarily who you’re going to vote for. The data shows that Gen Z is currently allocating their votes between the three major parties. But beneath the statistics that show Gen Z will vote Conservative, Liberal, or NDP, are figures that show that Gen Z is engaged with the Green Party and its leader Annamie Paul. In fact, on many metrics, Gen Z is more likely than any other generation to show support for the Greens and Ms. Paul.

Given that climate change is a major election issue for nearly a third (29%) of Gen Zers, it may seem unsurprising that this generation wants to support the Greens. Perhaps more interesting is Gen Z’s interest in Annamie Paul given that this is her first election as party leader.

When asked who would make the best Prime Minister of Canada, mainstream leaders Justin Trudeau and Jagmeet Singh both receive high marks from Gen Z (38% and 35% respectively). But it is the leader of the Greens who has resonated with Gen Z more than any other generation: Gen Zers are more than twice as likely than any other generation to say that Annamie Paul would be the best Prime Minister (10% Gen Z vs.4% Millennial, 4% Gen X, 3% Boomer).

What goes into considering someone the “best prime minister”? Ipsos asked Canadians which party leader best suited a variety of traits. The leader of the Greens received relatively low scores across the board at the national level- likely reflecting that this is her first federal election as a party leader and she is relatively unknown. Intergenerationally however, Gen Z shows they have stronger feelings towards Ms. Paul than other generations. Gen Z is significantly more likely to highlight Ms. Paul as:

Annamie Paul is someone who:

 

Gen Z

Millennials

Gen X

Boomer

Will get things done

10%

2%

3%

2%

Gives me hope about the future

9%

4%

3%

2%

Is best to manage during tough economic times

8%

4%

3%

1%

Will keep their election promises

8%

3%

2%

2%

Is sincere

8%

3%

3%

3%

Means what they say

8%

3%

3%

2%

 

These proportions are not large, but what is it that has led Gen Z to connect with Annamie Paul in a way that other generations have not? Perhaps Gen Zers are attracted to someone who looks and sounds like them? Gen Z is Canada’s most ethnically diverse cohort- in the 2016 Census, 27.5% identified themselves as a visible minority, more than any generation before them. Is Gen Z attracted to someone who could bring more gender and racial diversity to parliament? Or is it that Gen Zers feel a connection with Paul as public figure who has fought against racism and sexism in politics as Gen Z is more likely than any other generation to highlight racism and discrimination (14% Gen Z vs. 6% Millennials, 3% Gen X, 4% Boomers) or women’s issues (12% Gen Z vs. 4% Millennial, 2% Gen X, 1% Boomer) as a top campaign issue.

While Gen Z connects with Annamie Paul and the Green party more than any other generation, they are not voting for her in 2021. If the election were held tomorrow, 31% of Gen Z would vote Liberal, 27% Conservative, and 27% NDP. Only 6% say they would actually cast a ballot for the Greens.

Gen Z Votes Up for Grabs?

If we acknowledge that Gen Z won’t be voting Green, but that they likely will be voting, then the next question is which major party will get their votes? Justin Trudeau may be the only Prime Minister Gen Z have any memories of, and they are generally satisfied with the job he has done- 52% say they approve of his performance, compared to 47% of the general population, while 57% say things in Canada are currently on the right track, compared to 48% of the general population.

But the Liberals don’t have the Gen Z vote locked in- 32% of Gen Zers say they are more likely to vote NDP since the campaign began, fully 10 points higher than the national average. While the Liberals and NDP both have a chance at the Gen Z vote, Conservatives should not despair- Gen Z is nearly as likely as Boomers to say there is a potential that they would vote Conservative in 2021 (31% Gen Z, 20% Millennial, 27% Gen X, 38% Boomer).

So despite their commitment to climate change and affinity for Annamie Paul, Gen Z is not going to vote Green in 2021.They’re either undecided or uncertain if they will actually vote for their preferred party. Gen Z is a generation who has not yet made up their minds who they will be voting for, but they’re committed to voting. What makes Gen Z different from other demographics is that their political sway will only become more evident in future elections. As more Gen Zers turn 18 and become eligible to vote, their voices will take up increasing market share in the political sphere. The data suggest that Annamie Paul has made inroads with this population early. However, Gen Z votes are still up for grabs as evidenced by the figures that show how divided their votes are. Given how tight the race is between the three major parties there remains an opportunity to capitalize on the Gen Z vote.

(Ipsos Canada)

15 September 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-ca/news-polls/canadas-youngest-voters-setting-aside-ideals-for-strategy

 

708-43-14/Polls

Poll Finds Trudeau (32%, -2) Narrowly Remains Best Choice For Prime Minister, Over O’Toole (29%, Unchanged) And Singh (25%, -4)

Toronto, ON, September 16, 2021 — Heading into the final days of the campaign, a new Ipsos poll conducted exclusively for Global News reveals that Liberal Party leader Justin Trudeau narrowly remains the best choice for Prime Minister according to Canadians. His lead over Erin O’Toole has eroded to just three points, while at the start of the campaign it was 14 points.

Trudeau Remains Best Candidate for PM, But Lead over O’Toole Shrinks

Despite continued decreases since the start of the campaign, Canadians still feel that Justin Trudeau would make the best Prime Minister of Canada (32%, -2 since last week), but only marginally so. Perceptions of Erin O’Toole have remained stable (29%, unchanged), but belief that Jagmeet Singh would make the best leader of Canada has experienced a decrease (25%, -4). Fewer Canadians see Annamie Paul (4%, unchanged) and Yves-François Blanchet (5% +1, 23% in Quebec, +7) as the best candidate for Prime Minster of Canada. 

Based on current Ipsos polling data, Trudeau and Singh continue to poll on par or ahead of the overall vote intention for their respective parties (32% of Canadians say they intend to vote for the Liberal party, and 32% of Canadians say Trudeau is the best fit to be the Prime Minister; 21% of Canadians intend to vote for the NDP, and 25% of Canadians say Singh is the best fit to be the Prime Minister). O’Toole and Blanchet continue to trail their parties.

 

Vote Intention (Party)

Best Candidate for PM

Trudeau

32% (+1)

32% (-2)

O’Toole

32% (-)

29% (-)

Singh

21% (-2)

25% (-4)

Blanchet

7% (-)

5% (+1)

Paul

4% (-)

4% (-)

 

Just in time for election day, Trudeau has regained confidence among Ontarians for the best candidate for Prime Minister (35%, +2), ahead of O’Toole (31%) and Singh (26%). Trudeau remains the preferred candidate in Quebec (36%), ahead of Yves-François Blanchet (23%), and in Atlantic Canada (35%). The Prairie provinces remain skeptical of Trudeau’s leadership (16%, -11 AB, 21%, +6 SK/MB), favouring O’Toole as the best fit for Prime Minister (43%, unchanged AB, 40%, -3 SK/MB). Younger voters remain more likely to support Singh, with Trudeau having a slight edge over O’Toole among those aged 35+.

 

Which Federal Party Leader Would Make the Best Prime Minister? By Region

 

 

Total

BC

AB

SK/MB

Ontario

Quebec

Atlantic

Justin Trudeau

32%

31%

16%

21%

35%

36%

35%

Erin O’Toole

29%

24%

43%

40%

31%

22%

17%

Jagmeet Singh

25%

37%

31%

26%

26%

13%

33%

Yves-François Blanchet

5%

-

-

-

-

23%

-

Annamie Paul

4%

3%

6%

4%

5%

2%

5%

 

Which Federal Party Leader Would Make the Best Prime Minister? By Age

 

 

Total

18-34

35-54

55+

Justin Trudeau

32%

26%

31%

36%

Erin O’Toole

29%

24%

29%

32%

Jagmeet Singh

25%

33%

29%

17%

Yves-François Blanchet

5%

4%

4%

7%

Annamie Paul

4%

6%

4%

2%

 

Trudeau Continues to Lead on All Negative Traits

Skepticism persists around the federal party leaders and their role in the future of Canada, with four in ten (41%, +1) Canadians feeling that none of the leaders will keep their election promises, and a third (34%, +1) who feel that none of the candidates will make things more affordable, a key policy issue of the campaign. The pessimism that surrounds Canadians could lead to lower turnout rates at the polling booths, which was already a possibility due to a pandemic-election. 

With less than a week to go until election day, Trudeau remains the leader who Canadians feel will best represent the country on the world stage (30%, unchanged), is best to manage Canada during tough economic times (28%, +1), and has the right temperament and maturity to be the Prime Minister (27%, -1).

However, Trudeau continues to lead on the negative traits, including that 43% (-3) of Canadians feel Trudeau will say anything to get elected, and 36% (unchanged) feel he has a hidden agenda, a trait which is typically attributed to the Conservative leader of the day. Only one in five (20%, -2) feel he is a leader they can most trust, and a third think he is in over his head (33%, -1), the highest among all the candidates.

Although support for the NDP has cooled off ahead of election day, Singh remains the leader for nearly all positive traits, more than Trudeau and O’Toole. Notably, O’Toole has surpassed Singh for the top candidate who would spend taxpayers’ money wisely (22%, unchanged vs 20%, -2 Singh).

 

 

Party Leader Attributes: Which Major Federal Party Leader is Someone Who Is/Will…

 

Trudeau

O’Toole

Singh

Paul

Blanchet

None of them

Will keep their election promises

17% (-1)

16% (-1)

19% (-2)

3% (-)

4% (+1)

41% (+1)

Make things more affordable

16% (-1)

18% (+1)

25% (-2)

5% (+2)

3% (+1)

34% (+1)

You can trust

20% (-2)

16% (-1)

22% (-1)

4% (+1)

5% (+1)

33% (+2)

Spend taxpayer money wisely

19% (-)

22% (-)

20% (-2)

3% (-)

4% (+1)

32% (-)

Means what they say

19% (-)

16% (-2)

24% (-2)

5% (+2)

6% (+1)

30% (+1)

Gives me hope about the future

22% (-1)

19% (-)

22% (-2)

5% (+2)

4% (-)

29% (+1)

Is sincere

20% (-)

15% (-3)

25% (-4)

6% (+2)

5% (+1)

29% (+5)

Provide open, responsible, and ethical government

21% (-)

19% (-1)

23% (-3)

5% (+2)

4% (-)

28% (+2)

Whose values represent my own

22% (-1)

19% (-1)

22% (-2)

5% (+2)

6% (+1)

25% (-)

Best to manage during tough economic times

28% (+1)

25% (-1)

15% (-2)

3% (-)

4% (-)

26% (+3)

Get things done

25% (-)

22% (-)

19% (-3)

3% (-)

4% (-)

27% (+3)

Fight for the middle class

20% (-)

19% (-2)

30% (-1)

3% (+1)

4% (-1)

23% (+2)

Has a hidden agenda

36% (-)

30% (-2)

7% (+1)

2% (-3)

3% (-)

22% (+4)

Wants to lead Canada for the right reasons

24% (+1)

19% (-3)

24% (-4)

4% (-)

4% (+1)

24% (+3)

Protect the interests of cultural, religious, and other minorities in Canada

22% (-1)

13% (-1)

34% (-5)

4% (-)

3% (-)

24% (+7)

Has the right temperament and maturity to be PM

27% (-1)

24% (+1)

20% (-4)

3% (+1)

4% (-)

22% (+3)

In over their head

33% (-1)

16% (-3)

10% (+2)

17% (-)

2% (-1)

21% (+2)

Best to represent Canada on the world stage

30% (-2)

22% (-2)

18% (-3)

3% (+1)

3% (-)

23% (+5)

Say anything to get elected

43% (-3)

27% (-2)

7% (+1)

3% (-1)

2% (-1)

17% (+4)

 

(Ipsos Canada)

16 September 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-ca/news-polls/poll-finds-trudeau-narrowly-remains-best-choice-for-prime-minister-over-o%E2%80%99toole-and-singh

 

AUSTRALIA

708-43-15/Polls

Almost 3 Million New Zealanders Read Newspapers And Nearly 1.8 Million Read Magazines In 2021

2.96 million, or 71.7%, of New Zealanders aged 14+ now read or access newspapers in an average 7-day period via print or online (website or app) platforms. In addition, almost 1.8 million New Zealanders aged 14+ (42.5%) read magazines whether in print or online either via the web or an app.

These are the latest findings from the Roy Morgan New Zealand Single Source survey of 6,609 New Zealanders aged 14+ over the 12 months to June 2021.

Cross-platform audience for New Zealand Herald holds steady above 1.8 million people

The standout performer during the pandemic at a masthead level has clearly been New Zealand’s most widely read publication the New Zealand Herald. The Herald had a total cross-platform audience of 1,844,000 in the 12 months to June 2021, unchanged on a year ago.

Stuff.co.nz retains the position as New Zealand’s leading news website for those on the lookout for the latest news on COVID-19 and what is going on in the country, bringing together leading newspapers the Dominion PostThe Press and Sunday Star-Times, and magazines such as the TV Guide and NZ Gardener. The total digital audience for Stuff in an average 7 days is nearly 1.72 million New Zealanders, well ahead of main rival NZHerald.co.nz on 1.56 million.

Two of the top ten titles grew their total cross-platform audience over the past year - the Otago Daily Times, which was up an impressive 32,000 (+12.7%) to an audience of 285,000 and the Taranaki Daily News, up 14,000 (+11.6%) to an audience of 132,000.

Filling out the top ten are the Sunday Star-Times in fifth place with 230,000 readers ahead of the Waikato Times on 184,000, Hawke’s Bay Today on 151,000, Bay of Plenty Times on 146,000 and the Northern Advocate on 121,000.

Despite the challenges of the past year Stuff’s newspapers have recorded a promising 2021 so far with six growing their total cross-platform audiences over the past year and an even more impressive nine growing their cross-platform audiences so far in 2021.

The nine Stuff newspapers which grew their total cross-platform audiences in the year to June 2021 compared to the year to December 2020 included the Dominion Post in Wellington, The PressSunday Star-TimesTaranaki Daily NewsSouthland TimesManawatu StandardNelson MailSunday News and the Timaru Herald.

Top 10 Newspapers – Total 7 Day Cross-Platform Audience (Print & Online)

Publication

Print

Digital
(web or app)

Total 7 Day Cross-Platform Audience* (print, web or app)

June
2020

June
2021

June
2020

June
2021

June
2020

June
2021

% Change

‘000s

‘000s

‘000s

‘000s

‘000s

‘000s

%

New Zealand Herald

674

584

1,537

1,598

1,844

1,844

0.0%

Dominion Post

245

224

282

276

432

428

-1.1%

The Press

185

161

195

192

314

293

-6.7%

Otago Daily Times

111

105

194

225

253

285

12.7%

Sunday Star-Times

217

177

69

62

273

230

-15.7%

Waikato Times

104

75

138

125

214

184

-14.3%

Hawke’s Bay Today

92

70

115

97

177

151

-14.6%

Bay of Plenty Times

73

62

112

101

155

146

-6.2%

Taranaki Daily News

52

65

91

91

118

132

11.6%

Northern Advocate

71

63

70

72

129

121

-6.0%

Full Newspaper Readership Results available to view here.
*Cross-Platform Audience is the number of New Zealanders who have read or accessed individual newspaper content via print or online. Print is net readership in an average 7 days. Online is net readership online in an average 7 days.

New Zealand Listener relaunches and increases their readership during the COVID-19 pandemic


The weekly New Zealand Listener was temporarily suspended from publication during 2020 as the COVID-19 pandemic caused a sharp drop in advertising revenue early in the year. Later in the year New Zealand Listener was relaunched and has experienced impressive growth in the year to June 2021, up by 13,000 to an average issue readership of 213,000.


However, despite the improvement for the second-placed New Zealand Listener, New Zealand’s most widely read magazine is easily the driving magazine AA Directions which had an average issue readership of 364,000 during the year to June 2021.


Other widely read magazines included TV Guide with a readership of 171,000, Australian Women’s Weekly (NZ Edition) on 147,000, NZ Woman’s Day on 143,000, NZ House & Garden on 105,000, NZ Woman’s Weekly on 101,000, NZ Gardener on 98,000 and Cuisine & Habitat both on 84,000.


The two fishing magazines grew their readership over the past year with Fish and Game NZ, up 11,000 to a readership of 52,000 and NZ Fishing Magazines, up 16,000 to a readership of 37,000. NZ Outdoor Hunting was another winner over the past year with readership up 1,000 to 34,000.


There was also growth in the readership of several magazines in the home improvement and decorating categories including Home NZ which increased its readership by 4,000 to 49,000, Kiwi Gardener with readership up 14,000 to 43,000, Homestyle NZ with readership up 16,000 to 34,000 and Houses NZ with readership up by 4,000 to 32,000.


Several Are Media magazines including New Zealand ListenerAustralian Women’s Weekly (NZ Edition)NZ Woman’s Day and NZ Woman’s Weekly were temporarily suspended from publication in the June and September 2020 quarters due to the New Zealand lockdown. The figures for these magazines show average readership for the available quarters.

New Zealand’s Top 10 Magazines by Average Issue Print Readership

 

Publication

June 2020

June 2021

% Reach Change

‘000s

‘000s

%

AA Directions*

416

364

-1.6%

**New Zealand Listener*

200

213

0.2%

TV Guide*

182

171

-0.4%

**Australian Women’s Weekly
(NZ Edition)*

181

147

-0.9%

**NZ Woman’s Day*

212

143

-1.8%

NZ House & Garden*

114

105

-0.3%

**NZ Woman’s Weekly*

158

101

-1.4%

NZ Gardener*

108

98

-0.3%

Cuisine

126

84

-1.2%

Habitat*

92

84

-0.3%

Full Readership Results for over 90 New Zealand Magazines available to view here.
*Roy Morgan has measured additional readership for this magazine via Cross-Platform Audiences – see next section. **Note: Are Media magazines were temporarily suspended during the June and September 2020 quarters. Results for these magazines have been suppressed for the impacted quarters, average issue readership is allocated instead.

 

New Zealand Listener leads cross-platform* audience growth – up over 6% on a year ago

Of the top ten magazines the ‘re-booted’ New Zealand Listener had the biggest cross-platform audience growth over the past year, up by 16,000 (+6.9%) to 243,000 in the 12 months to June 2021.


Dish also grew its total cross-platform audience over the last year, up 2,000 (+1.0%) to 147,000, to be the eighth most widely read magazine.

 

However, motoring magazine AA Directions is still easily New Zealand’s most widely read magazine with a market-leading total cross-platform audience of 447,000 – over 200,000 ahead of any other magazine.


Other leading magazines with strong cross-platform audiences include TV Guide on 195,000, NZ Woman’s Day on 193,000, Australian Women’s Weekly (NZ Edition) on 187,000, NZ Woman’s Weekly on 155,000, Mindfood on 149,000, NZ House & Garden on 146,000 and NZ Gardener on 140,000.


A majority of seven out of the top ten magazines grew their digital audience over the past year during the pandemic including AA Directions, up 14,000 to 166,000, Dish, up 17,000 to 95,000, Mindfood, up 14,000 to 93,000, NZ House & Garden, up 13,000 to 68,000, NZ Gardener, up 4,000 to 64,000 New Zealand Listener, up 4,000 to 63,000 and Australian Women’s Weekly (NZ Edition), up 7,000 to 59,000.

Top 10 Magazines – Total Cross-Platform Audience (Print & Online)

 

Publication

Print

Digital
(web or app)

Total Cross-Platform Audience*
(print, web or app)

June
2020

June
2021

June
2020

June
2021

June
2020

June
2021

% Change

‘000

‘000s

‘000s

‘000s

‘000s

‘000s

%

AA Directions

416

364

152

166

481

447

-7.0%

**New Zealand Listener

200

213

59

63

227

243

6.9%

TV Guide

182

171

63

59

219

195

-10.8%

**NZ Woman’s Day/ Now to Love

212

143

103

73

283

193

-31.9%

**Australian Women’s Weekly (NZ Edition)

181

147

52

59

219

187

-14.6%

**NZ Woman’s Weekly/ Now to Love

158

101

103

73

237

155

-34.5%

Mindfood

108

76

79

93

166

149

-10.3%

Dish

87

79

78

95

145

147

1.0%

NZ House & Garden

114

105

55

68

154

146

-5.4%

NZ Gardener

108

98

60

64

150

140

-6.6%

Full Newspaper Readership Results available to view here.

*Cross-platform audience is the number of New Zealanders who have read or accessed individual magazine content via print or online. Print is average issue readership. Digital is average website visitation and app usage (if available) in last 7 days for weekly titles (National Business Review, New Idea, NZ Listener, NZ Woman's Day, NZ Woman's Weekly, Property Press, That's Life, Time, TV Guide) and last 4 weeks for all other non-weekly titles.


**Note: Are Media magazines were temporarily suspended during the June and September 2020 quarters. Results for some of these magazines have been suppressed for the latest quarter, average issue readership is allocated instead.


Canvas and Viva grow their readership over the last year


The Weekend New Zealand Herald newspaper inserted magazine Canvas (North Island) is again the most widely read with an average issue readership of 253,000, up 4,000 on a year ago. Also increasing its readership was Viva (North Island) with a readership of 166,000, an increase of 20,000 on a year ago.


Despite a fall in readership, Sunday is the second most widely read magazine in the category with a readership of 174,000.


Behind the three market leaders are Weekend (North Island) on 161,000, Your Weekend on 140,000 and Bite (North Island) on 124,000.

New Zealand’s Leading Newspaper Inserted Magazines by Print Readership

Publication

Jun 2020

Jun 2021

% Reach Change

‘000s

‘000s

%

Canvas (North Island)

249

253

-0.1%

Sunday

195

174

-0.7%

Viva (North Island)

146

166

0.3%

Weekend (North Island)

180

161

-0.6%

Your Weekend

151

140

-0.4%

Bite (North Island)

171

124

-1.3%



Michele Levine, Chief Executive Officer, Roy Morgan, says:

 

“The latest Roy Morgan readership figures for New Zealand covering the year to June 2021 show nearly 3 million New Zealanders (71.7% of the population aged 14+) now read or access newspapers in an average 7-day period via print or online (website or app).

 

“The standout performer is again the New Zealand Herald with a total cross-platform audience of over 1.84 million, unchanged on a year ago. The New Zealand Herald is read by over four times as many people as any other newspaper.

 

“Leading newspapers to grow their cross-platform audiences over the last year, despite all the disruptions to normal life caused by COVID-19, were the Otago Daily Times, up 12.7% to 285,000, Taranaki Daily News, up 11.6% to 132,000 and Southland Times, up 14.8% to 116,000.

 

“However, in the purely digital realm Stuff holds the advantage. Over 1.71 million New Zealanders access the Stuff platform in an average 7 days. The Stuff group of newspapers brings together ten of the country’s leading newspapers such as the Dominion PostThe PressSunday Star-Times and the Waikato Times through their news portal Stuff.co.nz.

 

“In the latest figures nine out of Stuff’s ten newspapers grew their total cross-platform audiences in the year to June 2021 compared to the figures for the year to December 2020. Those newspapers to grow their audiences included the Dominion Post in Wellington, The Press, the Sunday Star-TimesTaranaki Daily NewsSouthland Times and the Manawatu Standard.

 

“New Zealand’s magazines have faced a similarly challenging period over the past 18 months since the pandemic began with intermittent lockdowns disrupting the normal course of activities and the latest lockdown centred on Auckland now extending for over a month to deal with the highly contagious Delta variant. There were several magazines that suspended their publishing during periods of the pandemic, especially in the period from April 2020 to September 2020.

 

“Despite these challenges the audiences for New Zealand’s magazines are holding steady and in the year to June 2021 nearly 1.8 million New Zealanders (42.5% of the population aged 14+) read magazines whether in print or online either via the web or an app.

“Magazines to grow their digital audiences over the past year include the relaunched New Zealand ListenerDishFish & Game NZKiwi Gardener and the National Business Review. There were also several magazines to grow their print readership led by New Zealand ListenerFish & Game NZ¸ NZ Fishing NewsNZ Outdoor HuntingHome NZKiwi Gardener and Homestyle NZ.”

(Roy Morgan)

September 13 2021

Source: https://www.roymorgan.com/findings/8776-new-zealand-roy-morgan-readership-results-newspapers-and-magazines-june-2021-202109130613

 

708-43-16/Polls

57% Of Australians Approve Of The Federal Government’s Agreement To Purchase Nuclear Submarines From The USA

There are large differences based on voting intention on this question with 89% of L-NP supporters approving of the agreement to buy nuclear-powered submarines from the United States compared to 47% of ALP supporters and only 14% of Greens supporters. Supporters of One Nation (79%) and the United Australia Party (71%) are also clearly in approval of the agreement.

There is also a clear gender gap with over two-thirds of men (68%) approving of the agreement to buy nuclear-powered submarines compared to only 46% of women.

There is also a clear ‘age gap’ on views of the agreement. There is strong approval for the agreement to buy nuclear-powered submarines among people aged 50-64 (60%) and those aged 65+ (72%).

In contrast people aged 35-49 are evenly split (50% 50%) on the agreement and a small majority of younger people, (53% aged 18-24, and 51% aged 25-34) disapprove of the agreement.

Analysis by States shows there is clear majority approval across all States led by South Australia (61%). South Australia is set to be the location of where the submarines will be built. Just behind are Queensland (60%), Tasmania (60%), Western Australia (56%), New South Wales (55%) and Victoria (55%).

 

Michele Levine CEO Roy Morgan, says the Federal Government’s announcement today that Australia will be buying nuclear-powered submarines from the United States has won the approval of a clear majority of 57% of Australians in a special Roy Morgan Snap SMS survey:

“Australians woke up this morning to a special three-way joint press conference between Prime Minister Scott Morrison, US President Joe Biden and British Prime Minister Boris Johnson to announce Australia had made an agreement to purchase nuclear-powered submarines from the United States.

“The announcement has created a clear political divide with the vast majority of L-NP supporters (89%) approving of the agreement. There is also strong support from One Nation supporters (79%) and supporters of the United Australia Party (71%).

“However, the issue does create a clear split amongst ALP supporters with a slim majority of 53% disapproving of the agreement compared to 47% approving. The almost 50:50 split amongst ALP supporters provides the Government with a potential ‘wedge’ issue to divide ALP supporters on national security grounds in the upcoming Federal Election. ALP Leader Anthony Albanese will have to be very careful with how he explains the ALP’s position on the agreement.

“In contrast, Greens supporters are almost uniformly opposed to the agreement with 86% of Greens supporters disapproving and only 14% approving. Greens Leader Adam Bandt has already made their position clear today by asserting that ‘this dangerous nuclear submarines move puts floating Chernobyls in the heart of Australian cities

“As well as the political split there are also clear divides based on gender and age. Over two-thirds of men (68%) approve of the agreement compared to only 46% of women. And while there is strong support amongst Australians aged 50-64 (60%) and 65+ (72%), in contrast among Australians aged under 35 a slim majority disapprove.

Australians surveyed were each asked the following question:

●        Question 1: “Today the Federal Government announced an agreement to buy nuclear-powered submarines from the United States, do you approve or disapprove?” Approve 57% cf. Disapprove 43%.

This special Roy Morgan Snap SMS survey was conducted with an Australia-wide cross-section of 1,714 Australians aged 18+ on Thursday September 16, 2021.

 

Nuclear submarines for Australia.

Today the Federal Government announced an agreement to buy nuclear-powered submarines from the United States, do you approve or disapprove? By Gender & Age

Australians
18+

Gender

Age

Men

Women

18-24

25-34

35-49

50-64

65+

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

Approve

57

68

46

47

49

50

60

72

Disapprove