BUSINESS & POLITICS IN THE WORLD

 

GLOBAL OPINION REPORT NO. 721-722

 

 

Week: December 13 –December 26, 2021

 

Presentation: December 31, 2021

 

 

Contents

 

721-722-43-41/Commentary: Positive Attitudes Towards China In Arab World, A Study In 12 MENA Countries. 3

ASIA   19

The Tendency To Cook At Home Increased By Approximately 40%, And Has Not Been Regressed Much Even After Normalization. 19

In January-October 2021, Households In Turkey Spent 38% On FMCG Compared To The Same Period Of The Previous Year 23

MENA   24

Libya Country Report, 2021. 24

AFRICA.. 37

Only About A Quarter (27%) Of Emaswati Say Their Country Is A Full Democracy Or A Democracy With Minor Problems  37

Most Citizens (81%) In Eswatini Say They Are Free To Vote As They Please. 39

WEST EUROPE.. 41

YouGov Friendship Study Part Two: Friendship Circles And Types Of Friends Britons Have. 41

At Least 2 In 3 Britons Think Government Doing A Bad Job On Managing Immigration, The NHS And Levelling-Up  43

New YouGov Research For The Times Reveals That Over Half Of Britons Are Taking Regular Lateral Flow Tests (57%) 45

Three In 10 (29%) Britons Say They Will Only Use Recyclable Wrapping Paper This Year, To Help The Environment 47

UK Public’s Predictions For 2022. 49

Many Britons Self-Policing To Save Their Christmas From Covid As Just Over 4 In 10 Say Current Measures Aren’t Strict Enough. 51

Three In Ten Britons Are Stressed About Christmas 2021. 53

Only A Third Of Britons (35%) Say They Think They Know What Cancel Culture Means. 55

Latest Findings Show Cases Of Omicron Rising Fast, While Highlighting Success Of Booster And Teenage Vaccination Programmes. 59

Online Harassment Is A Very Serious Problem According To 68% Of French People. 61

48% Of Civil Servants Believe That The Lack Of Equipment Is An Obstacle To The Practice Of Teleworking. 63

For Almost Every Second German Woman, Women's Rights Do Not Go Far Enough. 67

Christmas, DIY Wins Again: 1 Italian Out Of 2 Will Give Something Made With Their Own Hands. 69

Charity At Christmas: Better In December, But Those Who Donate More Don't Forget The Other Months. 70

NORTH AMERICA.. 72

Increased Avoidance Of Care, Drugs Due To Cost Amid Pandemic. 73

Racial And Ethnic Differences Stand Out In The U S Gig Workforce. 76

Overall, About Half (52%) Of Americans Say The U S Is One Of The Greatest Countries, Along With Some Others  79

About Four-In-Ten Republicans And Republican-Leaning Independents (42%) Say Reagan Has Done The Best Job As President Over The Past 40 Years. 82

43% Approve Of The Way President Joe Biden Is Handling His Job. 86

Overall, About Half Of U S Adults (48%) Say That Most Things In Society Can Be Clearly Divided Into Good And Evil 88

Many U S Workers Are Seeing Bigger Paychecks In Pandemic Era, But Gains Aren’t Spread Evenly. 92

Majority (56%) Of Canadians Support Another Lockdown To Stop The Spread Of Omicron. 96

Only Half (50%) Of Canadians Currently Working From Home Say They Expect To Return To The Office Regularly In 2022. 97

AUSTRALIA.. 99

Eight In Ten Australians Expect A Better Year In 2022. 99

Only 37% Of Australians Expect 2022 Will Be ‘Better’ Than 2021 – Down 22% Points On A Year Ago. 101

Over A Third Of Australians, 37%, Say 2022 Will Be A Year Of Economic Difficulty While 19% Expect Economic Prosperity. 107

MULTICOUNTRY STUDIES. 112

A New YouGov Euro Track Survey, Conducted In 7 European Countries And USA, Shows There Is Clear Confusion About How Clean Nuclear Energy Is. 112

A Survey Carried Out In 28 Nations Shows That 82% Of Global Average Believes That World Is More Dangerous  115

In 30-Country Survey, Two-Thirds Say They Now Pay More For Transportation, Food And Drink, And Utilities Than They Did Six Months Ago. 117

The Obamas Remain World’s Most Admired Public Figures, A Study In 38 Countries. 120

Positive Attitudes Towards China In Arab World, A Study In 12 MENA Countries. 122

Striking Findings From 2021, 16 Countries. 127

32% Say That Coronavirus Is One Of The Biggest Issues Facing Their Country Today, A Survey In 28 Countries Tells  141

Globally, 59% Of The Population, On Average, Consider The Cost Of Living To Be Higher Now Than It Was Six Months Ago, Among 30 Countries Analyzed. 145

How Many People Have Been Hit By The Global Supply Chain Crisis In 7 European Countries And The U S. 147

 


 

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

This weekly report consists of forty surveys. The report includes nine multi-country studies from different states across the globe.

 

721-722-43-41/Commentary: Positive Attitudes Towards China In Arab World, A Study In 12 MENA Countries

In recent years, China’s engagement in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) has been rapidly increasing.  At least 17 MENA countries have signed agreements as part of its Belt and Road Initiative (BRI).  Meanwhile, in response to the COVID pandemic, Chinese vaccines have been secured by a number of countries across the region while China has promised aid to help address the challenges caused by the pandemic. In short, China has taken several steps to try to win the hearts and minds of ordinary citizens across the region.

Before the start of the pandemic, views of China were relatively positive across much of the region. Public opinion surveys conducted by Arab Barometer, a non-partisan research network seeking to understand the views of ordinary citizens in the region, show that many citizens favor stronger economic relations with China. In nationally representative face-to-face surveys conducted in 2018-9,  about half or more said they wanted their country to increase their economic ties with China in nine of twelve countries. A stronger economic relationship with China was most favored by Jordanians (70 percent), Libyans (63 percent) and Sudanese (62 percent). Among the countries surveyed, only in Algeria (36 percent) and Egypt (30 percent) did fewer than four-in-ten citizens favor strengthening economic ties with China.

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Support for stronger relations with China tends to be higher among elites. Those who have a university degree or above are at least ten percentage points more likely to favor strong ties with China in Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria, Iraq, and Egypt, for example.  However, there is no consistent difference by generation, with views of China being similar among those who are younger and older in most countries.

Beyond closer economic relations, citizens across MENA were also largely supportive of foreign aid from China in 2018-9. In the eleven countries and territories where this question was asked, half or more favored assistance from China in nine cases, including at least six-in-ten in Jordan, Sudan, Yemen, and Palestine. The key exceptions are Libya and Algeria, where fewer than half favor Chinese foreign assistance.

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Following the onset of COVID, Arab Barometer conducted its sixth wave by phone given health concerns related to in-person interviews.  Surveys were conducted from summer 2020 to spring 2021 in seven countries every few months. Views of China remained relatively high by spring 2021 in most of the countries surveyed, with majorities saying they had a favorable view in seven of the countries surveyed: Algeria, Morocco, Libya, Tunisia, and Iraq.  Only in Lebanon (38 percent) and Jordan (34 percent) did fewer than half say they viewed China very or somewhat favorably. In Lebanon, these relatively low views are more likely the result of political than economic considerations. Following the financial crisis, Hezbollah sided with a bailout from China as opposed to other political parties that favored working with the IMF.

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Despite China’s efforts at vaccine diplomacy and promises of foreign assistance to the region, views did not change dramatically during the survey period. For example, in Tunisia, China’s favorability was 55 percent in summer 2020 compared with 59 percent in spring 2021 while in Jordan there was a similar difference of four points over a similar period of time.  Despite China’s overtures to the region and provision of vaccines to many countries, popular attitudes appear relatively unaffected.

Although popular views of China are relatively positive across MENA, evidence from Arab Barometer suggests they are not particularly deeply held.  As part of the sixth wave, Arab Barometer included a question about the degree to which China’s developing economic power represents a critical threat to MENA.  In none of the six countries where the survey was asked does more than about a quarter see China’s economic power as a critical threat.  Lebanese (26 percent) are the most concerned, but only 15 percent in Jordan and Morocco and 13 percent in Algeria hold this view.  Given the influx of largely cheap goods from China, this result may be counterintuitive, especially given that the U.S. is viewed as an equal or more substantial economic threat in all countries surveyed.

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Even though relatively few citizens view China as a threat, there is also not a preference for Chinese economic engagement in MENA.  In the sixth wave, Arab Barometer asked citizens what foreign country of origin they would prefer for a company who was contracted to construct an infrastructure project in their country.  In all seven countries surveyed, a company based in Germany was seen as the most likely to build a project of the highest quality, including by as many as half in Algeria and Libya. In contrast, in no country did more than one-in-five say that China would build the best quality project.  Meanwhile, when asked about the company that would pay the best salaries to the local workforce, citizens were split between picking the U.S. (four countries) and Germany (three countries) as the most preferred country of origin.  In all countries except Iraq, one-in-ten or fewer say a Chinese company would pay the best salaries.

Finally, when asked the country of origin for the company they would most prefer to get the contract, in no country is a Chinese company most preferred. In four countries, a German company is most preferred, with an American company preferred in two (including a tie with Turkey in Jordan), and France preferred in one. Meanwhile, only in Iraq (22 percent) is a Chinese company preferred by more than 15 percent of citizens.  In other words, support for “China, Inc.” appears to be relatively limited in MENA.

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Overall, these results imply that the future of China in MENA is still to be written. As a non-colonial power in the region, there appears to be an openness of those living in MENA toward China. In a region with many citizens looking for a rapid model for economic development, China could also represent hope given the dramatic transformation the country has undergone since the 1980s.  Many MENA citizens hope for a similar transition in their own countries.

Yet, the results also suggest that, at least to date, there is little more than hope and projection being placed on China. In 2019, Arab Barometer asked citizens in Kuwait whether they thought Chinese were good people.  Fully 42 percent said they didn’t know.  Notably, Kuwait is the first country in the Arab Gulf region to establish relations with Beijing, the first to sign up to its Belt and Road Initiative, it has a joint strategic partnership with China, and has more than US$14 billion annually in bilateral trade with China.  Despite these links, the survey results reveal that nearly half of Kuwaitis have no clear image of Chinese citizens. Although this question did not appear in other countries, given their weaker linkages, it is unlikely that their populations would have a substantially clearer view of Chinese citizens.

In short, China has an opportunity in the region but also faces risks to its popularity in the years ahead. As citizens in MENA come into more direct contact with China and its policies in the future, their views are likely to become more entrenched. Elsewhere, support from China has alienated publics, such as in countries like Sri Lanka and Malaysia, where foreign aid projects have not always been viewed as benefiting the local populations.  China’s continuing popularity will depend in large part on its ability to convince MENA publics that its foreign policy and assistance is working for their benefit.  If not, then it is likely that popular support for China will begin to fade in the years to come.

(Arabbarometer)

December 15, 2021

Source: https://www.arabbarometer.org/2021/12/fragile-popularity-arab-attitudes-towards-china/

 

SUMMARY OF POLLS

ASIA

(Turkey)

The Tendency To Cook At Home Increased By Approximately 40%, And Has Not Been Regressed Much Even After Normalization

According to the consumption behavior data compiled from the Ipsos Household Consumption Panel; Despite the rising prices, food and beverage purchases for the home increased compared to the pre-pandemic period. Consumers have become accustomed to cooking the food they consume at the restaurant at home during the quarantine period. Realizing that a meal out might cost 2-3 times more than at home, they began to devote more of their shopping budget to some of the higher-priced items at the grocery store. Because at the end of the day, they can still save money by cooking and eating that meal at home.

(Ipsos Turkey)

13 December 2021

 

In January-October 2021, Households In Turkey Spent 38% On FMCG Compared To The Same Period Of The Previous Year

Households went shopping an average of 194 times in the first 10 months of 2021 and spent 45 TL on each purchase. An average household spent 54 TL on branded products, 26 TL on open products and 20 TL on market branded products out of every 100 TL expenditure. Households spent more this year in Discount Markets and Independent Supermarkets, as in the previous year, compared to other channels. An average household spent 31 TL of each 100 TL of expenditure in Discount Markets and 23 TL in Independent Supermarkets.

(Ipsos Turkey)

14 December 2021

 

MENA

(Libya)

Libya Country Report, 2021

COVID-19, related challenges, and vaccine hesitancy While most countries were focusing all their resources on the fight against the Covid-19 pandemic, Libya was facing another challenge that significantly threatened the livelihood of its people: the civil war. It was, therefore, unsurprising, that in October 2020, internal instability and foreign interference were seen as the two most important challenges facing the country (30 percent and 26 percent, respectively) followed by the economic situation (20 percent), while only 12 percent named COVID-19.

(Arabbarometer)

December 14, 2021

 

AFRICA

(Eswatini)

Only About A Quarter (27%) Of Emaswati Say Their Country Is A Full Democracy Or A Democracy With Minor Problems

Only about a quarter (27%) of Emaswati say their country is “a full democracy” or “a democracy with minor problems”. The share who describe the country as “not a democracy” or “a democracy with major problems” has increased by 6 percentage points since 2013.Fewer than two in 10 citizens (16%) say they are “fairly satisfied” or “very satisfied” with the way their democracy is working.

(Afrobarometer)

13 December 2021

 

Most Citizens (81%) In Eswatini Say They Are Free To Vote As They Please

More than three-fourths (78%) of Emaswait say people “often” or “always” have to be careful about what they say about politics, up by 14 percentage points compared to 2018. Only about one-third (35%) of respondents believe that the media in Eswatini is “somewhat” or “completely” free from government interference.

(Afrobarometer)

20 December 2021

 

WEST EUROPE

(UK)

YouGov Friendship Study Part Two: Friendship Circles And Types Of Friends Britons Have

More than a third of Britons (37%) report having friends they don’t really bother to see, with this being more the case for men (41%) than women (34%). Younger Britons are the most likely to report having friends which they don’t bother seeing - 43-46% of 16-39-year-olds. Nearly one in ten Britons (9%) has a friend they don’t really like. This is mostly the case with 16-24-year-olds, where 18% have friends they’re not very fond of.

(YouGov UK)

December 16, 2021

 

At Least 2 In 3 Britons Think Government Doing A Bad Job On Managing Immigration, The NHS And Levelling-Up

When asked whether Boris Johnson’s government has done a good job or bad job across 10 key areas, clear majorities think the government is doing a bad job across a range of issues. These include managing immigration (73%), improving the NHS (70%), reducing regional inequalities (or “levelling-up”) (66%), crime (59%), tax and spending (58%), handling Brexit (57%) and improving the education system (55%).

(Ipsos MORI)

16 December 2021

 

New YouGov Research For The Times Reveals That Over Half Of Britons Are Taking Regular Lateral Flow Tests (57%)

New YouGov research for The Times reveals that over half of Britons are taking regular lateral flow tests (57%). This includes one in six (18%) who are using lateral flows regularly, irrespective of what plans they have. One in eight (12%) say they are regularly using lateral flow tests if they have come into contact with someone who may have Covid. A further 9% say they take a lateral flow test if they’re going into work, although this may be lower because of recent work-from-home guidance, while 8% say they use rapid testing if they’re going to socialise with friends or family and 5% test if they’re going somewhere busy.

(YouGov UK)

December 17, 2021

 

Three In 10 (29%) Britons Say They Will Only Use Recyclable Wrapping Paper This Year, To Help The Environment

To help the environment, Britons are most likely to avoid buying plastic presents this year, 36% say they will buy fewer while a third (33%) will buy fewer presents in general. Three in 10 (29%) say they will only use recyclable wrapping paper this year and 2 in 10 (21%) will avoid wrapping altogether by gifting experiences rather than physical presents. Forty-three per cent say they have less money to spend on Christmas presents this year compared to previous years while only 23% agree they will buy whatever they want irrespective of cost. 

(Ipsos MORI)

17 December 2021

 

UK Public’s Predictions For 2022

Given recent events, it may come as little surprise that a majority of UK adults think it likely that Boris Johnson will not be Prime Minister by the end of 2022. Six in ten (62%) predict this compared with a quarter (25%) who think it unlikely. Even 58% of 2019 Conservative voters think he will have left (31% believe it unlikely). In comparison, opinions are split when it comes to Keir Starmer’s position as Leader of the Labour Party. Thirty-eight per cent think he will not hold the position by the end of the year while 36% disagree.  

(Ipsos MORI)

20 December 2021

 

Many Britons Self-Policing To Save Their Christmas From Covid As Just Over 4 In 10 Say Current Measures Aren’t Strict Enough

As the Omicron variant continues to spread throughout the country, it seems as though most Britons are taking matters into their own hands and self-policing in order to avoid catching COVID before the festive weekend. Nine in 10 (89%) say they have already or plan to wear their face mask more while the same proportion are already or will start sanitising/washing their hands more regularly.

(Ipsos MORI)

21 December 2021

 

Three In Ten Britons Are Stressed About Christmas 2021

Three in 10 Britons (31%) say they’re currently feeling stressed about Christmas, including 6% who say they’re “very” stressed. Parents of young children, 25 to 44-year-olds and women are feeling most stressed about Christmas this year. Two in five (41%) parents with children aged between 5 and 11 years old say they’re feeling stressed about Christmas, compared with a quarter (25%) of parents of children over 18 and a third (32%) of non-parents.

(YouGov UK)

December 22, 2021

 

Only A Third Of Britons (35%) Say They Think They Know What Cancel Culture Means

As we found with our earlier study on another American political import – being ‘woke’ – Britons don’t know what the political elite are on about when they bring up cancel culture. Only a third of Britons (35%) say they think they know what cancel culture means. Almost two thirds don’t know what it means (65%), including close to four in ten who’ve never heard the expression in the first place (38%). Young people are more familiar with cancel culture, with 45% of 18-24 year olds saying they know what it is, compared to 40% of 25-49 year olds, 31% of 50-64 year olds, and 26% of those aged 65 and above.

(YouGov UK)

December 22, 2021

 

Latest Findings Show Cases Of Omicron Rising Fast, While Highlighting Success Of Booster And Teenage Vaccination Programmes

The latest findings from Imperial College London and Ipsos MORI, covering 23 November – 14 December 2021 (round 16 of the Study), detected 11 cases of the Omicron variant for data sequenced up to and including 11 December, with further sequencing underway for the remaining samples.All other positive cases where a lineage was determined have been confirmed as the Delta variant or sub-lineages of Delta, but the proportion of Omicron cases in the results was increasing rapidly at the time reporting was stopped.

(Ipsos MORI)

23 December 2021

 

(France)

Online Harassment Is A Very Serious Problem According To 68% Of French People

Cyberbullying is considered a serious problem (97%) (including very serious for 68%) and which will increase in the coming years (76%). Its seriousness should be taken seriously as well as other forms of harassment for 93% of French people, who believe that the consequences of online harassment for victims can be just as serious as in “real life” harassment situations”. Moreover, half of French people are afraid of cyberstalking for their relatives (50%) and 3 in 10 are worried about being directly victims. 

(Ipsos France)

December 13, 2021

 

48% Of Civil Servants Believe That The Lack Of Equipment Is An Obstacle To The Practice Of Teleworking

The shift from the public service to remote work is slower than in the private sector . Public officials are two times less likely (8%) than private sector employees (16%) to telework more than two days a week - even though they have an inter-union agreement which allows them to request it. A large majority of public sector workers (69%) also feel that the public service is lagging behind the private sector in terms of teleworking.

(Ipsos France)

December 21, 2021

 

(Germany)

For Almost Every Second German Woman, Women's Rights Do Not Go Far Enough

Almost half of all respondents (48 percent) say that women's rights in Germany have not yet gone far enough; 57 percent of women say that. A third of Germans say that women's rights in Germany have gone as far as they should go (34 percent); men say this more often than women (42 percent vs. 25 percent of women). Seven out of ten Germans find it unacceptable for a man to whistle after a woman he doesn't know on the street (70 percent). The distinction between men and women is rather small (71 percent of women vs. 68 percent of men). 

(YouGov Germany)

December 27, 2021

 

(Italy)

Christmas, DIY Wins Again: 1 Italian Out Of 2 Will Give Something Made With Their Own Hands

The Christmas holidays are fast approaching, but the Italians seem to have prepared themselves: 88% are in fact ready to enjoy the Christmas holidays, a figure even more true for the younger segment of the population (92% between 18-34 years) who seems to feel the spirit of the holidays even closer. In fact, it is no coincidence that it is the youngest who try their hand at hand-made gifts personally (52% of 18-34 vs 42% of 55+). In any case, this trend extends to almost half of Italians, who declare that they want to prepare handmade gifts personally (47%), especially among women (51% women vs 43% men).

(YouGov Italy)

December 16, 2021

 

Charity At Christmas: Better In December, But Those Who Donate More Don't Forget The Other Months

The conventional wisdom has it that at Christmas it is more good . By virtue of this tradition, for associations Onlus Christmas time it is often an important opportunity for raising funds , often through ad-hoc initiatives and proposals for "gift ideas" during the Holidays. YouGov explored how Italians respond to this idea of ​​Christmas generosity . Donations for charitable causes to non-profit organizations (Onlus) of any kind involve almost half of the Italian adult population: 44% declare that they have donated a sum of money to charity during the calendar year 2021 .

(YouGov Italy)

December 24, 2021

 

NORTH AMERICA

(USA)

Increased Avoidance Of Care, Drugs Due To Cost Amid Pandemic

Amid sharply rising inflation, the percentage of U.S. adults who report forgoing treatment for a health problem in the prior three months due to the cost of care has increased to 30%, according to a major new study by West Health and Gallup. Reports of being unable to pay for prescribed medicine in the prior three months, in turn, have risen to 14% during the same time span. Amid substantial levels of worry about costs brought on by the pandemic, nearly half of Americans (48%) report that COVID-19 has worsened their view of the U.S. healthcare system, while 7% say COVID-19 has improved it.

(Gallup)

DECEMBER 14, 2021

 

Racial And Ethnic Differences Stand Out In The U S Gig Workforce

From delivering groceries to driving others where they need to go, some Americans are turning to gig jobs to earn money. In fact, 16% of U.S. adults have ever earned money through an online gig platform, including 9% who have done so in the past year, according to a Pew Research Center survey conducted in August 2021. But there are racial and ethnic differences when it comes to who takes on these jobs and the negative experiences some gig platform workers say they face.

(PEW)

DECEMBER 15, 2021

 

Overall, About Half (52%) Of Americans Say The U S Is One Of The Greatest Countries, Along With Some Others

Young people in the United States express far more skeptical views of America’s global standing than older adults. They are also more likely to say it would be acceptable if another country became as militarily powerful as the U.S., according to a Pew Research Center survey of U.S. adults conducted in July. Overall, about half (52%) of Americans say the U.S. is “one of the greatest countries, along with some others.” Nearly a quarter say instead that the U.S. “stands above all other countries” (23%), while an identical share (23%) says “there are other countries that are better than the U.S.”

(PEW)

DECEMBER 16, 2021

 

About Four-In-Ten Republicans And Republican-Leaning Independents (42%) Say Reagan Has Done The Best Job As President Over The Past 40 Years

Around six-in-ten Democrats and Democratic leaners (59%) say Obama has done the best job as president of any president of the past 40 years. Far fewer name Bill Clinton (19%) or Joe Biden (5%), who will complete his first year in office next month. Seven presidents have served in the last 40 years, four Republicans and three Democrats. Among U.S. adults overall, 35% say Obama has done the best job over this period, followed by Reagan (23%), Trump (17%) and Clinton (12%).

(PEW)

DECEMBER 20, 2021

 

43% Approve Of The Way President Joe Biden Is Handling His Job

President Joe Biden's job approval remains entrenched in the low 40s, having registered 42% or 43% in four separate Gallup polls since September, including 43% in a new December survey. Biden began his term with relatively strong approval in the high 50s and stayed above the 50% mark through June. In July, when U.S. coronavirus cases surged, his approval fell to 50% and stayed at about that level in August. Then, after the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan, it dropped to the low 40s, where it has remained since.

(Gallup)

DECEMBER 21, 2021

 

Overall, About Half Of U S Adults (48%) Say That Most Things In Society Can Be Clearly Divided Into Good And Evil

Overall, about half of U.S. adults (48%) say that most things in society can be clearly divided into good and evil, while the other half (50%) say that most things in society are too complicated to be categorized this way. However, there are stark differences in opinion based on respondents’ religious affiliation and how religious they are. By comparison, only around half of U.S. Catholics (49%) and White Protestants who do not identify as evangelical (47%) say that most things in society can be clearly divided into good and evil.

(PEW)

DECEMBER 21, 2021

 

Many U S Workers Are Seeing Bigger Paychecks In Pandemic Era, But Gains Aren’t Spread Evenly

Almost two-thirds of U.S. private sector payroll workers (63.6%) work in industries where the average weekly wage in the second quarter of 2021 was at least 5% higher than it was in the second quarter of 2020, according to the most recently available data from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages, a product of the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics. The two sectors with the next biggest wage gains were information (which includes, among other industries, software publishing and “internet publishing and web search portals”) and company management. These are also the highest-paying sectors overall.

(PEW)

DECEMBER 22, 2021

 

(Canada)

Majority (56%) Of Canadians Support Another Lockdown To Stop The Spread Of Omicron

With the Omicron variant of COVID-19 spreading quickly and stoking worries of a sharp rise in case counts and hospitalizations, a new Ipsos poll conducted on behalf of Global News reveals that a majority (56%) of Canadians agree (20% strongly/36% somewhat) that we should have another lockdown to help stop the spread of the Omicron variant. Conversely, 44% oppose (18% strongly/26% somewhat) another round of lockdowns. Support is highest in Quebec (62%), British Columbia (61%), Atlantic Canada (60%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (59%) and lower in Ontario (53%) and, especially, Alberta (44%).

(Ipsos Canada)

17 December 2021

 

Only Half (50%) Of Canadians Currently Working From Home Say They Expect To Return To The Office Regularly In 2022

As the end of the year approaches, the future of the workplace remains uncertain heading into 2022 as only one half (50%) of Canadians currently working from home envision themselves returning to the office with any regularity in 2022, according to a new Ipsos poll conducted on behalf of Global News. The poll also asked working Canadians about their experiences in 2021 and what their expectations and feelings are about 2022, given the ever-changing contextual situation in Canada.

(Ipsos Canada)

26 December 2021

 

AUSTRALIA

Eight In Ten Australians Expect A Better Year In 2022

Of the nine questions where Ipsos has trend data since 2020, four show significant change in attitudes among respondents, indicating a more optimistic view of what 2022 will bring. Nonetheless, concerns about the environment and rising prices persist. And while most expect greater COVID vaccination rates around the world, half (47%) expect a new deadly strain of the virus to appear.

(Ipsos Australia)

19 December 2021

 

Only 37% Of Australians Expect 2022 Will Be ‘Better’ Than 2021 – Down 22% Points On A Year Ago

A special Roy Morgan web survey taken in late November shows only 37% of Australians think 2022 will be ‘better’ than 2021, down a large 22% points from when the same question was asked a year ago in late 2020. However, fewer than a quarter of Australians, 23%, think 2022 will be ‘worse’ than 2021, although this is up 13% points on a year ago. Nearly a third of Australians are hedging their bets on next year with 31% (up 14% points on a year ago) who say 2022 will be ‘the same’ and 9% (down 5% points) don’t know.

(Roy Morgan)

December 20 2021

 

Over A Third Of Australians, 37%, Say 2022 Will Be A Year Of Economic Difficulty While 19% Expect Economic Prosperity

A special Roy Morgan web survey taken in late November shows over a third of Australians, 37%, think next year will be a year of ‘Economic difficulty’, although this is down 11% points on a year ago when nearly half of Australians, 48%, predicted ‘Economic difficulty’ for 2021. For the second straight year there are only 19% of Australians who think next year will be a year of ‘Economic prosperity’. Nearly half of all Australians think next year will either ‘Remain the same’ (37%) or don’t know 7% how the economy will perform.

(Roy Morgan)

December 21 2021

 

MULTICOUNTRY STUDIES

A New YouGov Euro Track Survey, Conducted In 7 European Countries And USA, Shows There Is Clear Confusion About How Clean Nuclear Energy Is

Nuclear is embraced very differently by governments across Europe. In France, nuclear accounts for 70.6% of the country’s electricity generation. Next door, Germany is trying to phase out nuclear entirely. The EU itself is split on how to treat nuclear energy, with debate in Brussels about whether to classify it alongside renewable sources of power as an "environmentally sustainable economic activity”. Doing so would be seen as a direct recommendation to financial markets to invest in nuclear plants, according to German newspaper Die Welt.

(YouGov UK)

December 13, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/international/articles-reports/2021/12/13/what-do-europeans-and-americans-think-about-nuclea

 

A Survey Carried Out In 28 Nations Shows That 82% Of Global Average Believes That World Is More Dangerous

More than eight out of ten Brazilians think that the world is more dangerous compared to the previous year, according to the World Affairs survey, by Ipsos. In this survey, citizens of 28 countries assessed the global relations of their nations and what they considered to be the greatest threats to the planet. Colombians top the list of people who believe they live in a more dangerous world, with a rate of 91%. Next are Peru (90%), South Korea (88%) and the United States (85%). At the other end is China, with 68% of affirmative responses, followed by Germany, Malaysia and Italy – all with 77%.

(Ipsos Brazil)

14 December 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/pt-br/83-dos-brasileiros-acreditam-que-mundo-esta-mais-perigoso

 

In 30-Country Survey, Two-Thirds Say They Now Pay More For Transportation, Food And Drink, And Utilities Than They Did Six Months Ago

A new Ipsos survey finds about two-thirds of consumers across 30 countries saying the prices they are now paying for transportation, food and drink, and utilities seem higher than they were six months ago. About half report a rise in the cost of clothing and shoes, housing, medical and health care, and entertainment. On average globally, as many consumers expect their household spending will increase in the next three months (42%) as expect it will stay the same (41%). Increased spending expectations are closely correlated with perceptions of paying higher prices.

(Ipsos MORI)

14 December 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/ipsos-mori/en-uk/inflation-consumer-perceptions-30-countries-december-2021

 

The Obamas Remain World’s Most Admired Public Figures, A Study In 38 Countries

Former First Lady of the United States Michelle Obama remains Singapore’s most admired woman for the fourth year running. Other world leaders also feature prominently in the top ten. Queen Elizabeth II remains in second, as does Prime Minister of New Zealand Jacinda Ardern in fourth. Burmese politician Aung San Suu Kyi and the first female Chancellor of Germany Angela Merkel move up the list to third and seventh, respectively.

(YouGov Singapore)
December 15, 2021

Source: https://sg.yougov.com/en-sg/news/2021/12/15/obamas-remain-singaporeans-most-admired-public-fig/

 

Positive Attitudes Towards China In Arab World, A Study In 12 MENA Countries

In recent years, China’s engagement in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) has been rapidly increasing.  At least 17 MENA countries have signed agreements as part of its Belt and Road Initiative (BRI).  In nationally representative face-to-face surveys conducted in 2018-9,  about half or more said they wanted their country to increase their economic ties with China in nine of twelve countries. A stronger economic relationship with China was most favored by Jordanians (70 percent), Libyans (63 percent) and Sudanese (62 percent). Among the countries surveyed, only in Algeria (36 percent) and Egypt (30 percent) did fewer than four-in-ten citizens favor strengthening economic ties with China.

(Arabbarometer)

December 15, 2021

Source: https://www.arabbarometer.org/2021/12/fragile-popularity-arab-attitudes-towards-china/

 

Striking Findings From 2021, 16 Countries

A growing share of childless Americans say it is unlikely they will ever have children, an October survey found. Some 44% of non-parents ages 18 to 49 say it is not too or not at all likely that they will have children someday, an increase from the 37% who said the same in 2018. Meanwhile, 74% of adults younger than 50 who are already parents say they are unlikely to have more kids, virtually unchanged since 2018.

(PEW)

DECEMBER 17, 2021

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/12/17/striking-findings-from-2021/

 

32% Say That Coronavirus Is One Of The Biggest Issues Facing Their Country Today, A Survey In 28 Countries Tells

32% on average say that Coronavirus is one of the biggest issues facing their country today (+4 vs. last month) – making it once again the world’s number one worry. The largest month-on-month increases in concern about Covid-19 are seen in Germany (+23 points), the Netherlands (+19) and Belgium (+16). Poverty & Social Inequality is the second top issue this month, just behind Covid-19 with 31%. Inflation sees record-high levels of concern, ranking 7th out of 18 possible issues with 19%.

(Ipsos Canada)

21 December 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-ca/news-polls/what-worries-world-december-2021

 

Globally, 59% Of The Population, On Average, Consider The Cost Of Living To Be Higher Now Than It Was Six Months Ago, Among 30 Countries Analyzed

The upward trend of inflation in recent months, due to the increase in the price of goods necessary for the consumption of families such as electricity, fuel or food, is beginning to be noticed in the pockets of consumers around the world. This is confirmed by the data from the latest survey conducted from the Ipsos Global Advisor online platform. On average, 59% of the world's population believes that the cost of living has increased in the last half year. 

(Ipsos Spain)

December 22, 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/es-es/el-57-de-la-poblacion-espanola-percibe-que-los-precios-han-subido-en-los-ultimos-seis-meses

 

How Many People Have Been Hit By The Global Supply Chain Crisis In 7 European Countries And The U S

In all countries surveyed, most people are aware that a global supply chain crisis is taking place. In most nations, between 83% and 95% have heard at least something about the problems facing the international supply network. The exception is Italy, where only 57% say they have. By contrast, people in the UK are noticeably more likely to have experienced key supply problems. A majority of Britons (56%) say they have personally experienced food shortages in shops, a figure slightly higher than in the US (49%) but substantially higher than all the continental European nations surveyed (6-18%).

(YouGov UK)

December 22, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/international/articles-reports/2021/12/22/how-many-people-have-been-hit-global-supply-chain-

 

ASIA

721-722-43-01/Polls

The Tendency To Cook At Home Increased By Approximately 40%, And Has Not Been Regressed Much Even After Normalization

According to the consumption behavior data compiled from the Ipsos Household Consumption Panel; Despite the rising prices, food and beverage purchases for the home increased compared to the pre-pandemic period.

Meat & Meat Products is one of the categories with the highest increase in domestic consumption. Despite the significant price increases that have continued for years, consumers are increasing their consumption of both red and white meat. On the other hand, the growth in the categories of oils and general food (especially frozen food, bouillon, pasta, but excluding legumes) gives clues to the change in household consumption.

The increase in household expenditures was due not only to more frequent consumption at home, but also to budgetary issues.

Consumers have become accustomed to cooking the food they consume at the restaurant at home during the quarantine period. Realizing that a meal out might cost 2-3 times more than at home, they began to devote more of their shopping budget to some of the higher-priced items at the grocery store. Because at the end of the day, they can still save money by cooking and eating that meal at home.

Current conditions enable consumers to make more rational decisions in their purchases…

Faced with very high prices for all their basic needs, consumers make their purchasing decisions more rationally. Consumers are trying to establish the price-benefit balance much more carefully than before, not only because of their budget limits, but also to make the healthiest/logical decisions for their families. While meat dishes find more place in the tables, the opposite situation is observed in legumes dishes where the price increase is higher.

Consumers have learned to prepare both better quality and cost-effective meals with different recipes during the pandemic period.

While the unit price of meat may be higher than legumes, depending on the cooking method and the applied recipes, people can get more value for the money they pay.

Consumers, who cook more at home, make more rational decisions, and buy different products to prepare the meals they consume outside at home, create new opportunities for the food industry. It has become more critical for a brand to be present at home and inspire the consumer to make rational purchasing decisions.

RESEARCH IDENTIFICATION

About Ipsos Household Consumption Panel:

The Ipsos Household Consumption Panel consists of approximately 14,000 households spread across 35 provinces and was chosen to represent Turkey in terms of socio-economic status, household size and regions. Weekly purchasing data is collected from a continuous sample. The collected data is projected to ~22 million households. Households record their HTU purchasing information on the "diary" every day, this diary is collected weekly and processed after necessary controls. The following information is collected in the logs:

• Purchased product group

• Brand (in size and variety details)

• Amount purchased

• Frequency of shopping

• Place of purchase

• Price

(Ipsos Turkey)

13 December 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/tr-tr/yeni-normal-evde-yemek

 

721-722-43-02/Polls

In January-October 2021, Households In Turkey Spent 38% On FMCG Compared To The Same Period Of The Previous Year

Households went shopping an average of 194 times in the first 10 months of 2021 and spent 45 TL on each purchase.

The mass shopping behavior that started with the pandemic continued in the first 10 months of 2021. Compared to the pre-pandemic period, the average household went shopping less frequently and spent more on their cart with each purchase.

Although the demand for open products decreased slightly in the first 10 months of 2020, when there were COVID-19 restrictions, open products started to grow again as of 2021.

An average household spent 54 TL on branded products, 26 TL on open products and 20 TL on market branded products out of every 100 TL expenditure.

Households spent more this year in Discount Markets and Independent Supermarkets, as in the previous year, compared to other channels. An average household spent 31 TL of each 100 TL of expenditure in Discount Markets and 23 TL in Independent Supermarkets.

Compared to last year, Independent Supermarkets maintained their share, while National Chains, Local Chains and Discount Markets lost their share. Butcher/Deli was the channel that increased its share by growing above the average.

In the first 10 months of 2021, an increase was observed in the expenditure of Meat products, Oils, Snacks and Household Cleaning Products, above the average of Turkey. Meat products spend increased 54% in January-October 2021, while Fat increased 54%, Snacks 39%, and Household Cleaning products 39%.

You can find detailed information and graphics in our FMCG October Newsletter.

About Ipsos Household Consumption Panel:

The Ipsos Household Consumption Panel consists of approximately 14,000 households spread across 35 provinces and was chosen to represent Turkey in terms of socio-economic status, household size and regions. Weekly purchasing data is collected from a continuous sample. The collected data is projected to ~22 million households. Households record their HTU purchasing information on the "diary" every day, this diary is collected weekly and processed after necessary controls. The following information is collected in the logs:

• Purchased product group

• Brand (in size and variety details)

• Amount purchased

• Frequency of shopping

• Place of purchase

• Price

(Ipsos Turkey)

14 December 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/tr-tr/hane-tuketim-paneli-fmcg-bulteni-ekim-2021-degerlendirmesi

 

MENA

721-722-43-03/Polls

Libya Country Report, 2021

COVID-19, related challenges, and vaccine hesitancy While most countries were focusing all their resources on the fight against the Covid-19 pandemic, Libya was facing another challenge that significantly threatened the livelihood of its people: the civil war. It was, therefore, unsurprising, that in October 2020, internal instability and foreign interference were seen as the two most important challenges facing the country (30 percent and 26 percent, respectively) followed by the economic situation (20 percent), while only 12 percent named COVID-19. However, by March-April 2021, perceptions about the greatest challenges reversed as peace agreements largely held and direct confrontations had stopped for a few months, as a result of the August 2020 ceasefire. Instead, Libyans shifted their attention and concern towards more routine issues relating to daily life. Concern over the economic situation and COVID-19 rose to 25 percent and 24 percent, respectively. At the same time, lack of internal stability and foreign interference declined to 14 percent and 17 percent, respectively. Corruption remained fifth on the list of greatest challenges for Libyans, rising from seven percent in October 2020 to 12 percent in spring 2021.

Despite the slight shifts in attitudes regarding the biggest challenge facing the country, concern over the spread of COVID-19 in the next six months did not change significantly. Three-quarters of Libyans (75 percent) said they were very concerned or somewhat concerned about the spread of the virus between August and September of 2020. Seven months later, levels of concern remained high with 72 percent of Libyans saying the same between March and April of 2021. Thus, COVID-19 being a more important challenge could be the result of the ceasefire that pushed instability aside, rather than the result of COVID-19 being more concerning. Among those who expressed concern, more than a third cited the illness or death of a family member as their reason for concern in 2020 (35 percent between August and September; 36 percent in October). A smaller percentage cited the same reason between March and April 2021 (21 percent). Another prevalent item for concern among Libyans was the inadequate healthcare infrastructure in the country, with three-in-ten referring to it as their reason for concern in October 2020. As time went by, people’s compliance with the social distancing rules diminished, resulting in frustration among fellow citizens, with as high as 29 percent of Libyans citing others’ noncompliance as their reason for concern between March and April 2021. On the other hand, a sizable portion of those who are unconcerned about the spread of COVID-19 says that the threat of the virus is exaggerated (31 percent between March and April 2021 compared with a third in October 2020).

 

Libya has one of the lowest vaccine hesitancy rates in the region among countries surveyed. A clear majority of Libyans (70 percent) say they are very or somewhat likely to get the vaccine if it is made available to them. Libyans prefer US-made vaccines (26 percent) over vaccines made in other countries like Russia (17 percent), the UK (15 percent), and China (12 percent). Notably, around the time of the survey, only Sputnik (Russian) and AstraZeneca (British) vaccines were widely available for the public.

Most Libyans were lucky enough not to experience significant interruptions in their employment status due to COVID-19. Only two percent reported a permanent job loss, while fewer than a third of Libyans (29 percent) cited temporary job interruption, a tenth said they had to work from home, and 59 percent experienced no impact on employment at all. Nonetheless, the pandemic had brought on some major challenges for Libyan families. As the country lacked a resilient, up-to-date infrastructure, most institutions were forced to shut down in the first phases of the pandemic. School closures led to the disruption of kids’ education, as most schools lacked the resources to switch to online learning. More than half of Libyans say that this disruption is one of the two biggest challenges they faced because of COVID-19 (51 percent). Nearly half of Libyans point to inflation as the other biggest challenge (49 percent).

Evaluation of Public Services The conflict has further damaged most public services in the country, especially the healthcare and education systems. The concern over the spread of COVID19 in Libya is, in part, the result of a wide perception that the healthcare system is incapable of dealing with the pandemic. Only 26 percent of Libyans expressed satisfaction when asked about the healthcare system in October 2020. The percentage remained effectively unchanged, increasing by only two points to 28 percent between March and April 2021. With the current health challenges, it is no surprise that 44 percent choose the healthcaresystem as their preferred top priority for government spending in the upcoming year. The education system fared even more poorly in the eyes of citizens. In October 2020, only 24 percent said they are completely satisfied or satisfied with the education system; and 26 percent chose it as top priority for government spending in the upcoming years. As schools reopen their doors for students, more people are expressing their satisfaction with the education system between March and April 2021 (34 percent). This rise may also be attributed to the general sense of optimism and hopefulness regarding the government at the beginning of 2021.

Government trust and performance In February 2021, the UN-facilitated national dialogue process ended with the formation of a new, unified executive authority termed the Government of National Unity (GNU). The formation of the GNU followed years of division in state institutions that weakened the government, causing it to lose the trust of most Libyans. The GNU fared better than its predecessor, the Government of National Accord (GNA), with 44 percent for GNU compared to 35 percent for GNA. In October, the House of Representatives scored similarly to the GNA (35 percent).

In terms of performance, Libyans seem to be willing to give the GNU a chance. A few weeks after its formation, more than half say they are completely satisfied or satisfied with the GNU performance (53 percent), which may be more based on hope than on the GNU’s actions to date. The survey results suggest that two main fields have contributed significantly to this level of satisfaction with the government. The first is the response to COVID-19. The GNU Prime Minister emphasized repeatedly that combating COVID-19 was one of his government’s priorities. The government received and began administering vaccines around the period the survey was fielded. Although the GNU had been recently formed at the time of the survey, Libyans rate its performance in responding to the pandemic more highly (53 percent) than that of the GNA (34 percent).

The other field contributing to the positive evaluation of the GNU performance is security. Libyans appear to associate the current state of calmness and relative stability with the work of the government itself. The majority say that the GNU performance in providing security and order is very good or good (58 percent). This evaluation, however, differs across regions. While 61 percent in the central region say the performance is very good or good, only 42 percent in the south say the same. Additionally, Libyans are more satisfied with the GNU performance in keeping prices down (36 percent) than with the GNA performance (20 percent).

Economy The Libyan economy has suffered the consequences of conflict and instability which led to the shutdown of oil production, the main source of income for the state. It is, thus, no surprise that fewer than a quarter of Libyans said the economic situation is very good or good in October 2020 (22 percent). The halting of hostilities and new political agreement earlier this year has resulted in a steady oil production and a stable currency exchange rate, which translated immediately to improvements to the overall economy. In spring of 2021, nearly half (45 percent) of Libyans said the economic situation was very good or good. However, this evaluation, too, varies between regions. While more than half in the West say the situation is very good or good (51 percent), only 29 percent evaluate the situation as such in the south, along with 39 percent in the East and 47 percent in the central region. Notably, Libyans still express optimism in their prediction of the economic situation in the upcoming years. In spring 2021, the majority said that the situation will be much better or somewhat better in the next 2 – 3 years (78 percent). Critically, those living in the different regions are about equally optimistic about Libya’s economic future.

Corruption Similar to many countries in the region, Libya has a deep-rooted problem with corruption. The overwhelming majority of Libyans say that corruption is prevalent to a large or medium extent in state institutions and national agencies (86 percent in March and April 2021). Over half of the population, however, believes the GNU is working to combat corruption.

Views on democracy Ten years after the uprising that toppled the Gaddafi regime, Libyans continue to strongly support democracy. There is widespread agreement among Libyans that free elections, equal rights, and provision of basic services are important characteristics of any democratic system. The last general elections held in Libya took place in June 2014 for the House of Representatives. As the country fell into civil war shortly after that election, Libyans were not given a chance to vote again at the national level. Earlier this year, the National Dialogue Forum reached an agreement to host general elections in December 2021. While disagreements regarding procedural matters arose, the public’s desire to see elections held in the country remains unchallenged. The majority of Libyans say that free elections are an absolutely or somewhat essential part of democracy (71 percent). While Libya is almost homogenous religiously, with at least 95 percent of the population being Sunni Muslims, the country is home to multiple ethnic groups. There is a strong belief that democracy should be inclusive of all these groups, with more than seven-in-ten Libyans saying it is absolutely or somewhat essential that under a democratic government all people have the same rights regardless of religion or ethnicity. Meanwhile, a strong but somewhat lower percentage (68 percent) say that the provision of basic necessities for all is absolutely or somewhat essential part of democracy.

Nearly two thirds (64 percent) say that a democratic government is always preferable. While around a quarter (27 percent) say that a nondemocratic one might be preferable under certain circumstances. Although democracy is preferred, the ongoing crisis has possibly pushed more Libyans to prioritize efficiency and stability over democracy, at least in the short term. Almost two-thirds (65 percent) of the population say that whether a government is democratic or not does not matter as long as it can provide order and stability in the country. Roughly the same percentage say that Libya needs a leader who can bend the rules if necessary to get things done. That, however, does not necessarily mean that people are looking for a populist leader. Only half of Libyans (49 percent) say it is very or somewhat important to have a popular leader who appeals to the people, regardless of qualifications. Although Libyans are eager for democracy, their definition of the system might not match that of a liberal democracy.

One governance question that has been present in the Libyan political discourse since 2011 concerns the implementation of quotas, including gender and geographic quotas. The majority of Libyans believe that a gender quota should be implemented to allow for more women to hold elected positions (82 percent). Women, unsurprisingly however, are more supportive of a gender quota than men (93 percent for women versus 70 percent for men). Geographic quotas are often proposed as a solution to issues of marginalization and centralization. They are, however, significantly less popular than gender quotas. Not quite half say that a geographic quota would be an ideal solution to the governance problem in Libya (47 percent). More than four-in-ten Libyans say that geographic quotas should not be implemented (43 percent). People in the eastern and southern regions of the country are somewhat more likely to support geographical quotas than their counterparts in the central and western regions.

Gender Women continue to face barriers to their participation in various aspects of public life in Libya, including in politics and in the labor force. Between August and September 2020, more than six-in-ten Libyans say they strongly agree or agree with the idea that a man is better at political leadership than a woman (61 percent). Despite that, three quarters say that a woman can become president or prime minister in a Muslim-majority country. At home, almost half of the population say that taking care of children is a woman’s primary responsibility (51 percent) and that a man should have the final say in all familyrelated decisions (46 percent) in the spring of 2021. In the labor market, the barriers to women’s employment appear to be more structural than cultural in nature. Nearly two thirds of Libyans say that low wages (68 percent), lack of childcare facilities (67 percent), and lack of means of transportation (63 percent) pose a significant barrier to women’s entry into the workforce. Cultural barriers, such as working alongside men or men being given priority in the job market, are seen as smaller barriers to entry.

International Relations The past 12 months witnessed a significant change in attitudes towards global and regional powers in the country, especially toward the United States. In October 2020, only 14 percent of Libyans said they have a favorable view of the U.S. Just one-in-ten Libyans rated the policies of former president Donald Trump as very good or good while more than three-quarters said that the former President’s policies were very bad or bad. President Trump’s unpopularity in Libya should not be a surprise, given his rhetoric against Muslims, and more importantly, his travel ban which targeted Libya among other Muslim-majority countries. In addition, Libyans were largely unconvinced that the U.S. foreign aid is helping their country. Nearly half said that the aid is neither strengthening civil society nor advancing women’s rights (46 percent). Notably, Libyans prefer foreign aid to focus on building infrastructure and improving the educational system in the country.

The recent change in the White House, following the 2020 elections, brought some positive changes in attitudes towards the U.S. among the population in Libya. Two months after President Biden assumed office, half of Libyans said they have a very favorable or somewhat favorable view of the U.S. Nearly half as well said President Biden’s foreign policies were very good or good (47 percent). Six-in-ten said they expect a great or medium change in U.S. foreign policy under Biden from that under Trump.

The other global superpower, China, is viewed more favorably in Libya. Around 60 percent of Libyans say they have a favorable view of China. Fewer than half, however, say that President Xi’s policies are very good or good (44 percent). The difference could be attributed to President Xi’s less prominent presence as the face of China’s foreign policy in the region, and in Libya in particular. Nearly a quarter of Libyans say they do not know Xi’s policies or refuse to answer the question (24 percent). Despite the high level of favorability China is getting in Libya, Chinese companies are not as popular as their Western counterparts. Only 11 percent of Libyans say they want Chinese firms to work on infrastructure projects in Libya, compared to 33 percent and 23 percent for German and American companies, respectively.

Unlike global powers, no regional power seems to enjoy widespread popularity among Libyans except for Saudi Arabia. A large portion of Libyans say they have a very favorable or somewhat favorable view of Saudi Arabia (58 percent). The policies of the Kingdom’s Crown Prince, Mohammed bin Salman, are seen as very good or good by 45 percent of the population. Interestingly, the Kingdom enjoys significantly more support in eastern Libya (70 percent) than it does in central Libya (45 percent). One possible explanation is the impact of Madkhali Salafists who exercise noticeable control over religious institutes and security services as part of their alliance with the Libyan Arab Armed Forces (LAAF), the de facto ruler of the eastern region. That is in addition to the Kingdom’s perceived support for the LAAF. Saudi Arabia’s main regional rival, Iran, is not as popular, however. Fewer than a quarter say they have a favorable view of the Islamic Republic (23 percent) and even less percentage say the policies of its Supreme Leader, Ali Khamenei, are very good or good (19 percent).

Several foreign actors have been heavily meddling in Libya over the course of the last decade. The foreign interference intensified during the April 2019 attack on Tripoli by the Libyan Arab Armed Forces, supported by Russia, against the Government of National Accord, supported by Turkey. This direct interference has damaged the popularity of the two countries in various parts of Libya. While 27 percent express favorable views of Turkey, a slightly smaller percentage (26 percent) say they have very or somewhat favorable views of Russia. Only two-in-ten Libyans say the policies of Russian president, Vladimir Putin, are very good or good. Though slightly more popular, Erdogan enjoys the approval of less than a quarter of the population (23 percent). Unsurprisingly, Turkey is two times more favored in the central and western regions - where most supporters of the GNA reside - than it is in the eastern region - where the LAAF is headquartered. Russia is least favorable in the central region.

As for the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, Libyans are overwhelmingly opposed to any normalization of relations between Arab countries and Israel. In October 2020, almost nine-in-ten Libyans said they strongly oppose or oppose the Abraham Accords. Only one percent said they strongly favor the accords. Although slightly fewer Libyans opposed the normalization between Morocco and Israel, the vast majority said in spring 2021 they strongly oppose or oppose the agreement between the two countries (78 percent). About onein-ten (9 percent) said they strongly favor or favor it.

(Arabbarometer)

December 14, 2021

Source: https://www.arabbarometer.org/wp-content/uploads/Public-Opinion-Libya-Country-Report-2021-En.pdf

 

AFRICA

721-722-43-04/Polls

Only About A Quarter (27%) Of Emaswati Say Their Country Is A Full Democracy Or A Democracy With Minor Problems

Citizens are more dissatisfied with the workings of Eswatini’s democracy than at any time

since Afrobarometer began its national surveys in the country in 2013.

The latest Afrobarometer survey shows declines in public perceptions of Eswatini as a

functioning democracy as well as in popular satisfaction with the way their democracy is

working.

In recent months, citizen dissatisfaction has found expression in protests across different parts

of the country.

In November, President Cyril Ramaphosa of South Africa visited Eswatini in his capacity as

chairperson of the Southern African Development Community’s Organ of Defence, Politics

and Security Cooperation to discuss the country’s political and security issues with King

Mswati III. After the meeting, the government announced that a national dialogue forum will

facilitate talks between pro-democracy groups and the government to manage political

tensions in the Kingdom.

Key findings

 Only about a quarter (27%) of Emaswati say their country is “a full democracy” or “a

democracy with minor problems” (Figure 1). The share who describe the country as

“not a democracy” or “a democracy with major problems” has increased by 6

percentage points since 2013.

 Fewer than two in 10 citizens (16%) say they are “fairly satisfied” or “very satisfied” with

the way their democracy is working (Figure 2). This proportion has dropped by more

than half since 2013, when 35% expressed satisfaction.

 Citizens with no formal education (58%) or primary schooling (62%) are less likely to

express dissatisfaction with the country’s democracy than their more educated

counterparts (72%) (Figure 3).

 Dissatisfaction is less pronounced among older citizens (61% of those aged 56 or

older) than among the younger population (70%-72%) (Figure 3).

(Afrobarometer)

13 December 2021

Source: https://afrobarometer.org/sites/default/files/press-release/eSwatini/news_release-satisfaction_with_democracy_drops_in_eswatini-afrobarometer-13dec21.pdf

 

721-722-43-05/Polls

Most Citizens (81%) In Eswatini Say They Are Free To Vote As They Please

Most Emaswati feel free to choose whom to vote into office but not free to say what they

think, the latest Afrobarometer survey shows.

A majority of citizens say they have to be careful when discussing politics.

Likewise, only a minority of citizens think the country’s media is free to report and comment

on current affairs without censorship or interference by the government.

Key findings

 More than three-fourths (78%) of Emaswait say people “often” or “always” have to be

careful about what they say about politics, up by 14 percentage points compared to

2018 (Figure 1).

 While most citizens (81%) say they are free to vote as they please, fewer than half as

many (36%) feel free to say what they think (Figure 2).

 Only about one-third (35%) of respondents believe that the media in Eswatini is

“somewhat” or “completely” free from government interference (Figure 3).

(Afrobarometer)

20 December 2021

Source: https://afrobarometer.org/sites/default/files/press-release/eSwatini/news_release-most_emaswati_feel_free_to_vote_but_not_to_speak_out-afrobarometer-20dec21.pdf

 

WEST EUROPE

721-722-43-06/Polls

YouGov Friendship Study Part Two: Friendship Circles And Types Of Friends Britons Have

More than a third of Britons (37%) report having friends they don’t really bother to see, with this being more the case for men (41%) than women (34%). Younger Britons are the most likely to report having friends which they don’t bother seeing - 43-46% of 16-39-year-olds.

Nearly one in ten Britons (9%) has a friend they don’t really like. This is mostly the case with 16-24-year-olds, where 18% have friends they’re not very fond of.

One in five Britons (18%) say they have friends out of habit rather than choice, with this being the case more for 16-24-year-olds (26%) compared to other age groups. A fifth of Britons (22%) have friends out of convenience (for reasons such as doing the same leisure activities or working in the same place), with more men (25%) than women (19%) having these kinds of friendships.

Results also show that 4% of Britons have ‘pity friends’ - people they don’t really want to hang out with but feel sorry for.

How many friends do people have who hold different political beliefs from theirs?

The contentious topic of the 2016 Brexit referendum and the political disputes which arose in recent years caused heated debates and tension between Britons, as earlier YouGov research has found.

The YouGov Friendship Study finds that 22% of Britons report  having ‘hardly any’ (17%) or no (5%) friends with different political beliefs. A plurality of Britons (35%) say that some of their friends have differing views, while 13% say they have a ‘fair amount’ and 6% say ‘most’ of their friends have different political views.

Labour voters (35%) are most likely to say they have no or hardly any friends with different political views, followed by one in four (25%) Lib Dem voters and just 14% of Conservative voters. A fifth (22%) of Conservative voters note that most or a large number of their friends have opposing political views, while this drops to 17% among Lib Dem voters and 15% among those who voted for the Labour party.

Do Britons have friends that are ten years older or younger than them?

More than half of Britons (53%) report having a friend with whom they have a 10 year age gap, with this being more the case among women (57%) than men (48%) – 42% of Britons say they do not.

Extroverted Britons (62%) are more likely than introverted Britons (46%)  to have friends who are at least a decade older or younger than them.

(YouGov UK)

December 16, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/lifestyle/articles-reports/2021/12/16/yougov-friendship-study-part-2-friendship-circles-

 

721-722-43-07/Polls

At Least 2 In 3 Britons Think Government Doing A Bad Job On Managing Immigration, The NHS And Levelling-Up

  • Criticism on the economy also rises - more Britons think government doing ‘bad job’ than ‘good job’ on managing the economy 
  • 2 in 5 Britons think Johnson government performing ‘worse than expected’ – including 1 in 4 2019 Conservative voters
  • However approval of vaccine programme remains strong – 8 in 10 say government doing a good job on vaccinating the public quickly

Government performance 

  • When asked whether Boris Johnson’s government has done a good job or bad job across 10 key areas, clear majorities think the government is doing a bad job across a range of issues.
  • These include managing immigration (73%), improving the NHS (70%), reducing regional inequalities (or “levelling-up”) (66%), crime (59%), tax and spending (58%), handling Brexit (57%) and improving the education system (55%).

Government performance

  • Meanwhile, for the first time for this Government, more Britons think it is doing a bad job managing the economy (49%) than a good one (39%). This is almost an exact reversal of the position in August, when more were positive than negative.
  • When compared to the summer, other big falls have been on ‘levelling-up’ (from a net score of -33 in August to -49 now) and tax and spending (from -17 to -30).
  • However, as they have been throughout the year, the public are positive about what is being done to get people vaccinated as soon as possible – 84% think the government is doing a good job on this.
  • On the COVID pandemic overall, 34% think the government is handling it well and 49% badly. Numbers are largely unchanged from November but somewhat lower than September where 44% thought the government was doing well and 36% badly.
  • Taking everything into account since 2019, the public are broadly split between whether Boris Johnson’s government is performing about the same as they expected (41%) or worse than expected (43% - only 11% say better than expected).  However this is a change for the worse since December last year, when 48% said about the same as expected and 34% worse.  Half (50%) of 2019 Conservative voters say the government has performed in line with expectations, but as many say worse than expected as say the government has exceeded their hopes (26% vs 22% respectively).  

Economic optimism 

The poll also found that 52 per cent expect the economy to get worse over the next 12 months, double the 25 per cent who think it will improve, giving an Economic Optimism Index score of -27, unchanged on the -26 of last month. 

Gideon Skinner, Head of political research at Ipsos MORI, says of the findings: 

It’s not just stories of Christmas parties that should give the Conservatives concern, but also perceptions of delivery on substantive policy areas, as our latest public scorecard on Government performance shows.  Britons still give the Government credit for the vaccines programme, but are more critical of delivery elsewhere – in particular immigration (where Conservative voters are also most unhappy), the NHS, and reducing regional inequalities.   The direction of travel is also getting worse for many of these since the summer, especially on managing the economy, where optimism shows little sign of returning.

 

(Ipsos MORI)

16 December 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/ipsos-mori/en-uk/least-2-3-britons-think-government-doing-bad-job-managing-immigration-nhs-and-levelling

 

721-722-43-08/Polls

New YouGov Research For The Times Reveals That Over Half Of Britons Are Taking Regular Lateral Flow Tests (57%)

With the rise of the new Omicron variant of Covid-19, the government has encouraged anyone who comes into contact with someone testing positive to take a daily lateral flow test for seven days, and to take a test before visiting friends and family.

As a result, demand for lateral flows has skyrocketed, and the official website often runs out of tests.

New YouGov research for The Times reveals that over half of Britons are taking regular lateral flow tests (57%). This includes one in six (18%) who are using lateral flows regularly, irrespective of what plans they have.

One in eight (12%) say they are regularly using lateral flow tests if they have come into contact with someone who may have Covid.

A further 9% say they take a lateral flow test if they’re going into work, although this may be lower because of recent work-from-home guidance, while 8% say they use rapid testing if they’re going to socialise with friends or family and 5% test if they’re going somewhere busy.

Two in five (38%) Britons are not regularly using lateral flow tests for any reason, however.

While 30% of women say they’re not testing regularly, some two in five men (45%) say the same. Similarly, the old are more likely to not be testing than the young, including around half (52%) of those aged over 65, compared to 22% of 18 to 24-year-olds.

Around half (48%) of working class British people say they are not regularly using lateral flow tests, compared to 29% of those from middle class households.

Conservative voters are more likely than Labour voters to say they aren’t using lateral flows, by 44% to 29%.

(YouGov UK)

December 17, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/health/articles-reports/2021/12/17/how-many-people-are-using-lateral-flow-tests-regul

 

721-722-43-09/Polls

Three In 10 (29%) Britons Say They Will Only Use Recyclable Wrapping Paper This Year, To Help The Environment

To help the environment, Britons are most likely to avoid buying plastic presents this year, 36% say they will buy fewer while a third (33%) will buy fewer presents in general. Three in 10 (29%) say they will only use recyclable wrapping paper this year and 2 in 10 (21%) will avoid wrapping altogether by gifting experiences rather than physical presents. 

Will you be having a green Christmas?

To cut down on carbon emissions from travel, 21% of Britons say they will give locally made presents and 14% will re-gift a gift they have previously received. The same proportion say they will send homemade Christmas cards rather than buying them. One in 10 (10%) Britons will move away from the traditional turkey dinner and enjoy a meat-free Christmas meal. 

Half of Britons disagree that Christmas is a time to splash out and not worry about the environmental. One in four (25%) agree they will buy more environmentally friendly presents, even if they cost more. 

What is influencing the Christmas presents you buy?

Along with the environment, Britons appear to be feeling cautious about spending too much money this Christmas. Forty-three per cent say they have less money to spend on Christmas presents this year compared to previous years while only 23% agree they will buy whatever they want irrespective of cost. 

When considering how time will be spent this Christmas compared to last year, opinion is split as to how much time will be spent socialising with others. Around 3 in 10 expect to spend more time socialising at their own home with family over (32%), outside their home visiting family (31%) or outside their home visiting friends (28%) than last year. One in four (23%) expect to spend less time socialising outside their home visiting friends compared to last year while 20% say the same about socialising outside visiting family and 17% socialising at home with family. 

How will this Christmas be different to the last?

Pippa Bailey, Head of Innovation at Ipsos MORI, said:

Very few people have been able to ignore the impact that climate change has had on our planet over the past year, with extreme weather conditions experienced globally and also closer to home with flooding and storms.  So it is good to see that the very real concern that these events have raised have translated into intentions for citizens to gift in a more sustainable way this Christmas.

(Ipsos MORI)

17 December 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/ipsos-mori/en-uk/greener-christmas-britons-plan-buying-fewer-plastic-presents-and-using-recyclable-wrapping-paper

 

721-722-43-10/Polls

UK Public’s Predictions For 2022

Politics

Given recent events, it may come as little surprise that a majority of UK adults think it likely that Boris Johnson will not be Prime Minister by the end of 2022. Six in ten (62%) predict this compared with a quarter (25%) who think it unlikely. Even 58% of 2019 Conservative voters think he will have left (31% believe it unlikely). In comparison, opinions are split when it comes to Keir Starmer’s position as Leader of the Labour Party. Thirty-eight per cent think he will not hold the position by the end of the year while 36% disagree.  2019 Labour supporters are also split – 39% think he will have left, but exactly the same proportion say it is unlikely.

However, while half (52%) expect there to be a General Election next year, this is well down on the 72% in 2018 who (correctly) predicted there would be a General Election in 2019.  Labour voters are most likely to forecast an election next year (59%), but half (48%) of Conservatives think it unlikely.

Over the pond, hopes are higher for Joe Biden in his position as President of the United States Half (51%) think it is unlikely that he will lose his job before the year is done while 3 in 10 say he’ll be out of the Oval office by 2023. 

In Europe, half of Britons expect another European country to hold a vote on leaving the EU, 52% say this is likely (down from 58% in 2018’s predictions for 2019) while 3 in 10 (31%) disagree. Another half (49%) think it’s probable that Russia will invade Ukraine in 2022, only 1 in 5 (22%) think it unlikely. 

COVID-19

Britons are still not confident that we will have got over the pandemic in 2022. Almost two-thirds (65%) think another national lockdown is likely next year while a similar proportion expect to see a new variant which is completely resistant to vaccines (62%). Only a quarter (24%) think we’ll see all Covid restrictions lifted permanently while 7 in 10 (69%) disagree. 

Economy and business

Nor do people think the coronavirus’ impact on the economy is over.  Opinion is split as to whether employees are likely to go back to work in offices full time. Four in 10 (40%) believe office workers will be back in their place of work full time while half (49%) do not. 

Overall, only a third (36%) of the UK public expect to see their personal financial situation improve over the course of 2022 while half (50%) think it unlikely. Younger people are most hopeful, 51% of under 35s think their situations are likely to improve compared with 28% of 35-75s.  Furthermore, opinions are split as to whether they will be food shortages in the UK in 2022, half (48%) think this is likely to happen while 40% disagree. 

When considering house prices, only 1 in 5 (20%) think they are likely to fall in their area while 63% disagree. Those in Greater London are most likely to expect this to happen, 3 in 10 (30%) in the capital think prices are likely to fall.  Overall, this is more optimistic than predictions for 2019, when 41% expected average house prices to fall. 

Society

While many countries made pledges to help the environment in 2021, few expect differences to be seen in 2022. Half expect to see the hottest summer on record (51% - almost exactly the same as predictions for 2019), next year while only 3 in 10 disagree (29%, down from 37%). 

Many Britons will be eagerly awaiting the announcement of the new James Bond actor after Daniel Craig made his final appearance in No Time to Die, but who will it be? Half (53%) expect to see an actor who is not a white male step into 007’s shoes while a quarter (26%) say this is unlikely. White Britons are more likely to expect this, 55% say this is likely compared with 46% of those from ethnic minority groups, 34% of whom believe it is unlikely. 

Despite England’s strong showing in the Euros this year, only 22% expect them to go one better and win the football World Cup in 2022 (61% believe it is unlikely).  Younger people are the most optimistic, 35% of under 35s forecast an England victory, against just 16% of 35-75s.

The Royal Family

Most UK adults expect to see Queen Elizabeth continue in her role during 2022: only a quarter (25%) think it’s likely that she will abdicate while 62% say it is unlikely.  However, it is seen as slightly more likely than 2018’s predictions for 2019, when 17% thought it might happen.

Considering her grandson across the Atlantic, few expect to see Prince Harry return to the UK. Sixteen per cent say he and his family are likely to move back to the UK while almost three-quarters disagree (72%). 

Gideon Skinner, Head of Political Research at Ipsos MORI, said of the findings:

It has been a hard few weeks for Boris Johnson and the Conservatives in terms of public opinion, and this is reflected in the numbers expecting a new occupant in Downing Street sometime next year, even among Conservative supporters (although it should be noted that expectations of a new general election are not as high as they were for 2019).  Of course, people’s (and pollsters’) predictions can be wrong, but it’s also worth looking at the fundamentals: few think we will have cast off the impact of the pandemic next year and many think we will see another lockdown and more resistant variants, and only a minority think their personal financial situation will get better.
On other matters, after a year of record climate change concern and the UK hosting COP26, there has been no reduction in those forecasting another record hot summer.  Meanwhile many still believe in the Queen’s sense of duty, about half think the next James Bond will break the white male mould, but you can’t accuse most people of having overly-optimistic expectations of England winning the 2022 World Cup.

(Ipsos MORI)

20 December 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/ipsos-mori/en-uk/new-pm-new-lockdown-and-new-james-bond-what-uk-public-predicting-2022

 

721-722-43-11/Polls

Many Britons Self-Policing To Save Their Christmas From Covid As Just Over 4 In 10 Say Current Measures Aren’t Strict Enough

As the Omicron variant continues to spread throughout the country, it seems as though most Britons are taking matters into their own hands and self-policing in order to avoid catching COVID before the festive weekend. Nine in 10 (89%) say they have already or plan to wear their face mask more while the same proportion are already or will start sanitising/washing their hands more regularly.

What COVID precautions are you taking before Christmas?

Eight in 10 (81%) are keeping or plan to keep their distance while socialising (such as not hugging or shaking hands with people), and a similar proportion have already or plan to have their booster jab (80%). 

Two-thirds say they have/will test themselves with lateral flow tests more regularly (67%) while the same proportion are shopping online rather than in store in order to avoid catching the virus. 

A majority of Britons are also taking matters into their own hands by avoiding public transport (58% have done so or plan to), not attending social gatherings in friends or family’s houses and not going to pubs or restaurants (both 57%). Just under half, 45%, of workers say they are or are going to work from home instead of the office, while 47% that they have not/plan not to attend their work Christmas party. 

When asked to consider the restrictions currently in place to limit the spread of the coronavirus, just over four in ten say they are not strict enough (44%) while 36% say they are about right and another 16% that they are too strict. 

How strict are the current Coronavirus measures?

Half (52%) of older people aged 45-75 believe the restrictions are not strict enough, compared with 34% of under 35s.  There is little difference by 2019 vote: 44% of Conservatives and 48% of Labour voters believe the current measures are not strict enough. 
Attitudes towards restrictions have only moved slightly from January 2021, when 48% felt measures were not strict enough while the proportion of Britons who feel restrictions are too strict has risen from 9% in January to 16% now (37% then felt they were about right, the same as now). 

A third of Britons (34%) think we will have to wait until July 2022 or after for life to return to “normal” while a further fifth (22%) think it will be never. Only 13% think life will be back to normal in three months’ time (March 2022), and another 18% that we will be by June 2022.

Gideon Skinner, Head of Political Research at Ipsos MORI, said:

As the debate continues on the best approach to deal with the rapid spread of the Omicron variant, Britons themselves say they are taking steps to avoid a COVID Christmas, such as wearing masks, washing hands and keeping their distance when socialising – and many are planning to get a booster jab if they haven’t already got one.  Around four in ten say they have avoided social gatherings at others' houses or going to pubs and restaurants, and another one in six say they plan to do so.  
Few expect there to be a quick return to normality, and on the restrictions themselves as throughout the pandemic most people think they are about right or not strict enough – only a small minority (although a slightly increasing one) think they are too strict.  But views are split – not quite half think the restrictions are not strict enough, and there is a clear age divide, with older people more in favour of tighter restrictions than the young.

(Ipsos MORI)

21 December 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/ipsos-mori/en-uk/many-britons-self-policing-save-their-christmas-covid-just-over-4-10-say-current-measures-arent

 

721-722-43-12/Polls

Three In Ten Britons Are Stressed About Christmas 2021

Christmas can be stressful for some even in non-pandemic times, and Christmas 2021 comes with the rising threat of the Omicron variant of Covid-19 and uncertainty about post-Christmas restrictions.

Three in 10 Britons (31%) say they’re currently feeling stressed about Christmas, including 6% who say they’re “very” stressed.

Who is feeling the festive strain the most?

Parents of young children, 25 to 44-year-olds and women are feeling most stressed about Christmas this year.

Two in five (41%) parents with children aged between 5 and 11 years old say they’re feeling stressed about Christmas, compared with a quarter (25%) of parents of children over 18 and a third (32%) of non-parents.

Festive stress appears to affect 25 to 44-year-olds most (37%) and the over-55s least (24%), and women are more likely to say they’re feeling stressed about Christmas (36%) than men (25%).

How has stress changed in the run up to Christmas?

Our stress tracker shows there has been a slight increase in the proportion of Britons saying they’re feeling stressed about Christmas.

On 3-5 December, a quarter (26%) of Britons said they were feeling stressed about Christmas, compared to 31% now.

(YouGov UK)

December 22, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/lifestyle/articles-reports/2021/12/22/three-ten-britons-are-stressed-about-christmas-202

 

721-722-43-13/Polls

Only A Third Of Britons (35%) Say They Think They Know What Cancel Culture Means

One of the new political catchphrases of recent years has been “cancel culture”. As with so many Westminster Bubble terms, it is an import from the United States, and refers to a desire or attempts to ostracise (or ‘cancel’) people or organisations with certain viewpoints, generally those that are considered un-progressive.

As we found with our earlier study on another American political import – being ‘woke’ – Britons don’t know what the political elite are on about when they bring up cancel culture.

Only a third of Britons (35%) say they think they know what cancel culture means. Almost two thirds don’t know what it means (65%), including close to four in ten who’ve never heard the expression in the first place (38%).

Young people are more familiar with cancel culture, with 45% of 18-24 year olds saying they know what it is, compared to 40% of 25-49 year olds, 31% of 50-64 year olds, and 26% of those aged 65 and above.

In fact, approaching half of 65+ year olds have never heard the term used in the first place (45%), twice as many as 18-24 year olds (23%).

Most Britons say that at least sometimes they feel unable to express their political or social views for fear of judgement or negative responses

While most Britons aren’t familiar with ‘cancel culture’ as a phrase, that’s not to say Britons don’t feel 'cancelled' from time to time.

A majority of Britons (57%) say they have, at least sometimes, found themselves stopping themselves from expressing their political or social views for fear of judgement or negative responses from others.

Conservative voters are more likely to say so than Labour voters (68% vs 53%), although notably most people in both groups feel this way. Women are also more likely to have held their tongue than men (62% vs 52%).

https://d25d2506sfb94s.cloudfront.net/cumulus_uploads/inlineimage/2021-12-21/Self%20censorship-01.png

Only a quarter of Britons (27%) say they always express their political or social views if they want to do so, regardless of potential judgement.

When have people kept quiet about their views?

This is not to suggest that any example of someone holding back is an example of cancel culture. Asked in what circumstances people have kept their lips zipped, Britons are most likely to do so with people they’ve only just met (49%), perhaps an understandable occasion on which to avoid a potential argument.

Likewise, four in ten Britons (40%) have done so at work, while one in three (34%) have avoided speaking their mind on social media, 31% have done so among friends, and 21% while with their family.

What views are Britons reluctant to express?

What views do people feel like they can’t express? To test this, we asked Britons a series of wedge questions on several divisive topics to see what side of an argument they came down on. Then we asked how often they find themselves hiding their views on those topics for fear of negativity.

In most cases, those holding what might be considered the ‘un-progressive’ view more frequently omit their opinions on that topic.

For example, those who believe immigration has generally been a bad thing for the UK are more likely to say they always or mostly have to hide their views on the subject of immigration levels to the UK (33%) than those who think immigration has been a good thing for the UK (10%). This is the topic on which people are most likely to say they feel they have to keep quiet.

Other top views people are more reluctant to express are the belief that ethnic minorities in Britain have things as good as white Britons, with 31% who hold this view feel they can’t ever or mostly can’t say so, and transgender issues, which 29% of those who disagree with the statement “a transgender woman is a woman” feel they have to frequently keep bottled up.

The exceptions to this trend are views on the British Empire and obesity, where both sides of the argument reported similar levels of reluctance to express themselves. When it came to views on the Conservative party, although there is not much difference at the always/mostly level, those with pro-Tory views are more likely to say they sometimes or rarely have to hide that fact than those with a negative opinion of the party.

Across all nine scenarios, only about 10-14% of those who sit on the more progressive side of the argument say they feel they always/sometimes have to keep their opinion to themselves.

“I used to be with ‘it’, but then they changed what ‘it’ was. Now what I’m with isn’t ‘it’ anymore and what’s ‘it’ seems weird and scary. It’ll happen to you!”

Comedian Ricky Gervais, who has been an outspoken critic of cancel culture, predicted recently that the views that young people hold today will in turn come to be seen as backward by future generations

"I wanna live long enough to see the younger generation not be woke enough for the next generation. It's going to happen. Don't they realise that, it's like, they're next. That's what's funny.”

It seems that, indeed, young people do not expect to become the bad guys. Only one in three 18-24 year olds (36%) think that some of their current views will come to be seen as unacceptable by future generations of young people during their own lifetime. An equal number (35%) anticipate their own future cancellation, however, while 29% are unsure.

https://d25d2506sfb94s.cloudfront.net/cumulus_uploads/inlineimage/2021-12-21/Self%20cancellation%20expectations-01.png

By contrast, almost half of the oldest Britons (47% of those aged 65 and above) expect some of their views to be seen as bad by future youngsters. One in three nevertheless are sure they’ll hold acceptable views until they die (35%).

What should we prioritise more: protecting free speech or stopping offensive and hateful speech?

Underpinning the whole cancel culture argument is the dilemma of how far societies should go to preserve free speech when that right is often exercised in ways ranging from the hurtful to the malicious.

Asked which should be the priority, 38% of Britons say the focus should be on protecting free speech, while 43% say protecting people from offensive or hateful speech should be the priority.

Men are much more concerned about protecting free speech and women are more concerned about blocking offensive/hateful speech. Likewise, Tories and Labour voters come down on opposite sides. Younger people are also much more concerned about protecting against offensive/hateful speech than protecting free speech, while older Britons are split between the two.

(YouGov UK)

December 22, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2021/12/22/cancel-culture-what-views-are-britons-afraid-expre

 

721-722-43-14/Polls

Latest Findings Show Cases Of Omicron Rising Fast, While Highlighting Success Of Booster And Teenage Vaccination Programmes

Over 97,000 volunteers in England took part in the study to examine the levels of COVID-19 in the general population between 23 November and 14 December. 

  • The latest findings from Imperial College London and Ipsos MORI, covering 23 November – 14 December 2021 (round 16 of the Study), detected 11 cases of the Omicron variant for data sequenced up to and including 11 December, with further sequencing underway for the remaining samples.
  • All other positive cases where a lineage was determined have been confirmed as the Delta variant or sub-lineages of Delta, but the proportion of Omicron cases in the results was increasing rapidly at the time reporting was stopped.
  • For samples collected up until 11 December, no cases of Omicron were detected in those who had received their booster jab, and the 11 who did test positive were double vaccinated and aged from 18-54 years.
  • The overall prevalence recorded in round 16 was 1.41%, meaning around one in 70 people were infected with the virus. This is a decrease from the 1.57% prevalence (one in 64 people infected) reported in round 15. However, prevalence continued to rise rapidly in round 16 from the beginning of December, after there had been a small dip at the end of November.
  • Prevalence in 12-17-year-olds dropped by over half from rounds 15 to 16 and prevalence dropped by approximately two-thirds in those aged 75 and over. There was also a drop off in prevalence from rounds 15 to 16 in those aged 65 to 74.
  • As reporting for this round ended on 14 December, it only picked up the beginning of the large rise and the record number of cases now being reported across England due to the prevalence of the Omicron variant.

Dr Jenny Harries, Chief Executive of the UK Health Security Agency, said:

I’d like to say a really big thank you to the members of the public who continue to take part in the REACT study. It provides vital insight into the prevalence of COVID-19 and, crucially, is helping us understand more about the Omicron variant. 

Omicron is spreading fast and the COVID-19 vaccine remains our best line of defence against it. 

I urge everyone who is eligible to come forward to receive their latest jab without delay – whether that’s a first, second, third or booster dose.

The main findings from the report are as follows:

  • There were 1,192 positives from 97,089 valid swabs in round 16, giving an overall weighted prevalence of 1.41%. This is down on the weighted prevalence recorded in round 15, which stood at 1.57%.
  • The highest weighted prevalence was recorded in London at 1.84%, a significant increase from the 1.23% recorded in round 15.
  • At a Lower Tier Local Authority level, eight of the ten highest estimates of prevalence based on a nearest neighbour method were found in London (Lambeth, Kensington and Chelsea, Hammersmith and Fulham, Southwark, Islington, Westminster, Wandsworth, Camden), with the two others, Cornwall and Plymouth, based in the South West.
  • BA.1 (Omicron) accounted for 1.69% (11 of 650) of the recorded COVID-19 infections where the sequencing was determined in this round (up to 11 December).
  • Of the 11 Omicron cases recorded in this round up to 11 December, 7 cases were symptomatic (5 with classic COVID-19 symptoms) and two were asymptomatic. The symptoms for the remaining two cases were unknown.
  • Based on the confirmed number of Omicron infections for swabs collected between 1-11 December, the estimated average prevalence of Omicron infections in England was 31,000 over this period.
  • In round 16 data the first Omicron infection was detected in London on 3 December, and subsequent confirmed Omicron infections appeared concentrated mainly in the South of England.
  • Prevalence in 12-17-year-olds dropped by over 50%, from 5.35% in round 15 to 2.31% in round 16. There was also a significant drop in prevalence from rounds 15 to 16 amongst the older age groups: 0.84% to 0.48% in those aged 65-74 and 0.63% to 0.21% in those aged 75 and over.
  • Prevalence in children between the ages of 5 and 11 was similar between rounds 15 and 16, 4.76% in the former and 4.74% in the latter, while there was a rise for those aged 18-24 0.93% (0.57%, 1.51%), 25-34 to 1.38% (1.10%, 1.74%) and 35-44 to 1.71% (1.48%, 1.98%).

Health and Social Care Secretary Sajid Javid said:

The latest REACT-1 data is yet more evidence that boosters are vital in protecting us from the Omicron variant.

While infections may be rising rapidly across the country, you can protect yourself, your friends, family and community by getting boosted now – like 28 million others across the UK so far.

Professor Paul Elliott, director of the REACT programme from Imperial’s School of Public Health, said:

The results reported in this round of REACT show that Omicron is spreading rapidly in England and especially in London, which now has the highest prevalence of COVID-19 in the country. Compared to the Delta variant, the proportion of Omicron cases is increasingly rapidly.

The positive news is that the both the teenage vaccination and booster programmes have already shown encouraging results, with prevalence amongst 12-17-year-olds and those aged 65 and above dropping significantly since the beginning of November.

However, we have seen prevalence overall rise sharply again since the beginning of December, which aligns with the rapid increase in the Omicron variant and the growing number of COVID-19 cases being reported nationally. It is therefore vital that as many people as possible get vaccinated, including getting their boosters, and take sensible precautions such as mask-wearing to reduce the risk of infection.

Kelly Beaver, Chief Executive at Ipsos MORI, said:

The latest REACT round finds an R number above 1 and high prevalence of COVID-19 in England, so it remains critical that people get vaccinated and boosted.

We have found a number of cases of the Omicron variant, demonstrating the speed at which it is becoming the dominant variant and highlighting why we must all exercise caution over the festive period to ensure that prevalence does not continue to rise even further in the new year.

(Ipsos MORI)

23 December 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/ipsos-mori/en-uk/latest-findings-show-cases-omicron-rising-fast-while-highlighting-success-booster-and-teenage

 

721-722-43-15/Polls

Online Harassment Is A Very Serious Problem According To 68% Of French People

  • Online harassment is a very serious problem according to 68% of French people
  • 1 in 2 French people believe that it is not talked about enough, and nearly 8 in 10 that the actions implemented to prevent and fight against are not enough (79%)
  • 78% of French people think that women are more often victims than men, yet ...
  • 59% of French people, regardless of gender, have already been victims of cyberstalking

Cyberbullying, a problem that worries the French and against which the actions taken are considered insufficient

Cyberbullying is considered a serious problem (97%) (including very serious for 68%) and which will increase in the coming years (76%). Its seriousness should be taken seriously as well as other forms of harassment for 93% of French people, who believe that the consequences of online harassment for victims can be just as serious as in “real life” harassment situations. ".

Moreover, half of French people are afraid of cyberstalking for their relatives (50%) and 3 in 10 are worried about being directly victims. Even more alarming, 83% of parents of children under 18 say they are worried about their children (51% are very worried).

Nevertheless, despite this very worrying situation, the speeches and actions against cyberbullying remain for many perceived as insufficient: 1 in 2 French people believe that it is not talked about enough, and nearly 8 in 10 that the actions implemented to prevent and fight against are not enough.

 

The difficulties of the French in clearly identifying what is cyberbullying contributes to maintaining many received ideas on the profile of harassers and victims.

The majority of French people (60%) find it easy to identify what is cyberbullying and what does not. However, when presented with a list of 16 acts of online harassment (according to official definitions), only 39% identify them all as such. For example, 1/3 of them (32%) consider that sending or posting unsolicited photos or images of a sexual nature does not constitute online harassment.

Even more worrying, nearly a quarter of French people do not identify any of the 16 behaviors tested as constituting harassment.

It should be noted that people who have never experienced online harassment better identify what is relevant (48% identify all the acts) than those who have been victims of several forms of harassment (20%). This is a sign that victims tend to minimize or even normalize harassment by being confronted with it.

As a result, the French absorb many received ideas on the profile of stalkers and harassed:

  • 90% of them think that online stalkers most often act anonymously… yet, among the victims, only one in four reports having been harassed by an anonymous profile or a fake profile. The majority of victims say they have been harassed by someone they knew (56%) (acquaintance, friend, colleague, etc.) and 37% by someone they did not know but who was acting under their real name.
  • 78% believe that women are more likely to be victims of online harassment than men… yet, among adults, the proportion of victims of harassment is as high among women as among men (59%).

Finally, this weak awareness of what cyberbullying really is has even led almost half of French people (and more the youngest, who grew up with the Internet) to have already had a behavior that could relate to it.       
 

The majority of the adult population has experienced cyberstalking in the past

59% of French people have already been victims of online harassment (16 behaviors relating to online harassment were tested), whether for example receiving repeated and insistent messages and friend requests from someone they did not know (32% had already experienced it), to receive abusive comments (19%) or even photos or images of a sexual nature when they had not requested them (21%).

  • Young people were confronted with it more than older people, even if the latter are not immune to this type of situation (74% of those under 35 have experienced it, but there is also a high proportion of victims. after this age: 59% of 35-59 year olds and 47% of 60 and over).

At the same time, nearly one in two French people (48%) has already witnessed it: a figure lower than the number of victims, which clearly shows that these situations are not always public but often insidious.

The main platforms on which harassment occurs are social networks (42% of social network users have already been the victim of harassment on these platforms). They are followed by communication applications (16% of users), at the same level as dating applications (16%: 22% of users against 12% of users).     
 

Faced with the risk of being harassed online on a dating site or application, users believe that platforms are increasingly taking steps to avoid it.

Users recognize that the risk of being harassed varies greatly from one dating site or application to another (73%), in particular because some platforms make more efforts than others to protect their users from harassment (76%). ).

Faced with the harassment situation experienced on a dating application, the victims would have liked, first of all, to be able to ask the application that the profile of the harasser be deleted (45%). As a second choice, the victims would have liked the application to spot harassment messages directly (37%) or, in fourth place, for the application to send messages to the stalker to explain to him that his behavior is problematic (30%). 

Nevertheless, the majority of current users of dating sites or applications (61%) perceive that they are already implementing more and more means to prevent and fight against harassment on their platforms.

Finally, the vast majority of French people (90%) believe that the creation of tools to detect potential harassers on dating applications, by identifying them for example when many messages are sent in succession while they remain without answer, is a good approach (a very good approach for 35%).

(Ipsos France)

December 13, 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/fr-fr/le-harcelement-en-ligne-est-un-probleme-tres-grave-selon-68-des-francais

 

721-722-43-16/Polls

48% Of Civil Servants Believe That The Lack Of Equipment Is An Obstacle To The Practice Of Teleworking

  • The shift from the public service to remote work is slower than in the private sector . Public officials are two times less likely (8%) than private sector employees (16%) to telework more than two days a week - even though they have an inter-union agreement which allows them to request it. A large majority of public sector workers (69%) also feel that the public service is lagging behind the private sector in terms of teleworking.
  • The agents identify obstacles to the practice of teleworking :
    • Cultural obstacles. Despite a year of teleworking, cultural barriers remain very strong in the public service. 68% (+ 3pts vs 2020) of agents judge that, in their organization, “people stay in the office to show that they are working”. In addition, 48% of them believe that managers' lack of confidence makes it difficult to develop teleworking.
    • Lack of equipment. Agents are more likely to believe that the lack of adequate tools is an obstacle to the practice of teleworking (48% vs. 30%). Agents are more likely than private sector employees to believe that their organization will probably be the target of a cyber attack (67% vs. 57%); and 41% think that it is not well equipped to answer it (59%)
  • Employees (private and public) who telework regularly (at least twice a week) are also those who have the most open work cultures : teamwork encouraged, autonomy in decision-making, trust given to employees by hierarchy, clear division of tasks.
  • The survey reveals strong disparities between the three sides of the civil service : State civil service (FPE), territorial civil service (FPT), hospital public service (FPH). Hospital civil servants currently telework less frequently: only 23% say they telework at least occasionally, against 35% of local civil servants and 53% of civil servants. of state.

NB  The workers questioned are workers in the public and private sectors who work every day or several days a week in an office.


The public service is converting to telework ... but less quickly than the private sector

Teleworking in the public service is not simply a cyclical phenomenon imposed by health constraints: there will indeed be a “before” and an “after” COVID crisis in this area .
Teleworking has entered the mores - and the minds - of civil servants: 32% practice it at least once a week , against 13% before the crisis (2020 figure).
62% of agents agree that the current crisis has had a lasting impact on work in their organization : according to them, there will be more remote work tomorrow.
These changes are generally appreciated: 56% of civil servants believe that teleworking has changed the organization of work in the right direction. A large majority (70%) wish to practice it (at least occasionally) vs. only 42% who practice it today.

A number of public officials have taken note of these long-term changes and have already made significant life changes. The practice of teleworking has led to:

  • 31% of them to modify their interior fittings
  • 7% to move to the countryside
  • 19% to carry out work in their home to facilitate the practice of teleworking

On the other hand, agents feel that the public service still lags behind the private sector : 69% of agents feel that the public service is lagging behind the private sector in terms of teleworking.

 

Confidence, access to information, clear distribution of tasks ... The robot portrait of the regular teleworker

Those who regularly telework (more than two days a week) are also those whose organizations are more open: teamwork encouraged, autonomy in decision-making, trust given to employees by the hierarchy, well-distributed tasks, access to remote documents.

Obstacles specific to the public service for the implementation of teleworking

Teleworking is an unprecedented managerial revolution in the public service, which today seems less well equipped than the private sector for its deployment. Several types of brakes appear very clearly.

Cultural obstacles remain strong

Despite a year of teleworking, nearly 7 in 10 agents continue to believe that in their organization, people stay in the office to show that they are working . More than half of the agents think that their management views teleworking in a negative light (58%), and that those who work remotely are considered to be in hiding (57%). Asked about the main elements that make the development of telework difficult, public officials cite above all the lack of confidence of managers (48%) the lack of equipment (48%) and the cultural problem (42%)

Nearly one in two agents judge that the lack of adequate tools to practice telework is an obstacle to its deployment, nearly four in ten underline the lack of organization for the implementation of teleworking and two in ten point to finger the lack of financial means. Findings systematically more widespread than in the private sector.
However, public officials recognize that their organization has made efforts to deploy the right tools. Indeed, 61% believe that their organization has deployed the right tools to facilitate teleworking since the confinement of March 2020 (+ 17% compared to the first barometer of November 2020).
Information security is an issue identified more by public officials than by private sector employees . 67% of civil service employees consider the fact that their organization is the victim of a cyberattack as “probable” (vs. 57% in the private sector). 41% of agents (40% in the private sector) also consider that their organization is not well equipped to respond to them .

 

Three aspects of the public service, three measures of teleworking

The study reveals very marked differences between the three sides of the civil service: State civil service (FPE), territorial civil service (FPT), hospital public service (FPH).

When asked about the tools and resources available to work remotely, 62% of hospital civil servants believe that their organization has not deployed the right tools (against 28% in the FPE and 42% in the FPT). 63% of hospital civil servants do not have easy access to all the documents they need when they are not in the office (vs. 33% in the FPE and 38% in the FPT).
As a result, there is a very marked difference in the practice of teleworking, with very large differences between the three aspects. FPE agents (32%) are twice as numerous as those of the territorial public service (15%) (FPT) and three times more likely than those in the hospital public service (9%) (FPH) to practice telework at least 2 days a week.

The agreement for teleworking in the public service, acclaimed but unknown by one in two agents

While almost all public officials approve of the fact that they can request to telework up to three days a week (80%), only 8% of them work remotely more than two days a week (vs. 16 % in the private).
For good reason, one in two public officials (48%) is unaware of the existence of the agreement on teleworking for the public service signed last July which stipulates that public officials can request to telework up to three days a week.

(Ipsos France)

December 21, 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/fr-fr/48-des-agents-de-la-fonction-publique-estiment-que-le-manque-dequipement-est-un-frein-la-pratique

 

721-722-43-17/Polls

For Almost Every Second German Woman, Women's Rights Do Not Go Far Enough

YouGov-Cambridge Globalism Project survey on feminism and women's rights

The topics of feminism, equal rights for women and women's rights have made waves in recent years, including through #MeToo. Currently, 15 percent of Germans say they call themselves feminists. As expected, women say this more often than men (22 percent vs. 8 percent of men).

15 percent of Germans describe themselves as feminists

Every fifth woman in Germany accepts whistles from strange men on the street

Almost half of all respondents (48 percent) say that women's rights in Germany have not yet gone far enough; 57 percent of women say that. A third of Germans say that women's rights in Germany have gone as far as they should go (34 percent); men say this more often than women (42 percent vs. 25 percent of women).

For almost half of Germans, women's rights do not go far enough

Seven out of ten Germans find it unacceptable for a man to whistle after a woman he doesn't know on the street (70 percent). The distinction between men and women is rather small (71 percent of women vs. 68 percent of men). 22 percent of all respondents say that they find it acceptable, 19 percent of women still make this statement, and one in four men says this (24 percent).

These are the results of the YouGov-Cambridge Globalism Project 2021 for which a total of 1,009 people in Germany were surveyed from August 19 to September 13, 2021 using standardized online interviews. The results are weighted and representative for the German population aged 18 and over.

(YouGov Germany)

December 27, 2021

Source: https://yougov.de/news/2021/12/27/fur-knapp-jeden-zweiten-gehen-frauenrechte-nicht-w/

 

721-722-43-18/Polls

Christmas, DIY Wins Again: 1 Italian Out Of 2 Will Give Something Made With Their Own Hands

YouGov recently conducted a survey for  ManoMano.it , the e-commerce specialist in home furnishings, do-it-yourself and gardening, to understand if the tradition of do-it-yourself is still consolidated among Italians during the holidays of Christmas.

The Christmas holidays are fast approaching, but the Italians seem to have prepared themselves: 88% are in fact ready to enjoy the Christmas holidays, a figure even more true for the younger segment of the population (92% between 18-34 years) who seems to feel the spirit of the holidays even closer. In fact, it is no coincidence that it is the youngest who try their hand at hand-made gifts personally (52% of 18-34 vs 42% of 55+).  
In any case, this trend extends to almost half of Italians, who declare that they want to prepare handmade gifts personally (47%), especially among women (51% women vs 43% men).

Among the most popular gifts this year in the field of do-it-yourself, we find, in addition to the classic homemade sweets and preserves, handcrafted household items, such as candles and infusions for the environment, cited by 48%, followed from handmade clothing (sweaters, t-shirts, hats and scarves ...) mentioned by 41%.
Women more than men intend to pour their creativity into the culinary field : in fact 66% of the female target vs 52% of the male target declare they want to prepare homemade desserts as DIY gifts.

Turning instead to the Christmas gifts that will be bought, people intend to spend an average of € 300 (a figure that rises among the more adult groups of the population: around € 200 in the 18-34 range, around € 350 in the range from 35 upwards. ).

But not just gifts: 74% of the interviewees said they made decorations and / or handmade Christmas decorations , a tradition more deeply rooted in the Center, South and Islands than in Northern Italy (76% Center, 80% South and 79% Islands vs 67% of the North West).

The DIY tradition is not only linked to the area of ​​gifts or Christmas decorations , but also extends to the area of ​​meals . Again, for Christmas dinners and lunches rather than going to a restaurant or ordering takeaway / delivery, Italians prefer to cook for themselves or for their family (68%) or go to the homes of relatives and friends (41%) ).

Speaking of habits, 90% of Italians believe that at Christmas it is better to prepare lunches and dinners at home all together with loved ones rather than spending the Christmas Eve dinner or Christmas lunch at a restaurant, just as 75% are convinced that preparing Christmas decorations and handmade decorations can make Christmas even more magical. About half of those who celebrate Christmas will still be able to carve out time to prepare even the most demanding hand-made gifts from the point of view of time and energy.

(YouGov Italy)

December 16, 2021

Source: https://it.yougov.com/news/2021/12/16/natale-il-fai-da-te-vince-ancora-1-italiano-su-2-r/

 

721-722-43-19/Polls

Charity At Christmas: Better In December, But Those Who Donate More Don't Forget The Other Months

The conventional wisdom has it that at Christmas it is more good . By virtue of this tradition, for associations Onlus Christmas time it is often an important opportunity for raising funds , often through ad-hoc initiatives and proposals for "gift ideas" during the Holidays. YouGov explored how Italians respond to this idea of ​​Christmas generosity .

Donations for charitable causes to non-profit organizations (Onlus) of any kind involve almost half of the Italian adult population: 44% declare that they have donated a sum of money to charity during the calendar year 2021 . Within this sample, the average annual donation was around € 160 , (€ 159, to be exact), with figures that tend to grow as the respondents age, with 55+ donating on average 205 € throughout the year.

But how much does the month of December weigh on the total? Respondents on average estimate to pay 24% of annual donations in December . A certainly high percentage for a single month, to demonstrate that, indeed, at Christmas we try to be better.

However, as important as it is, few are limited to December alone: ​​only 16% of Italian donors donate it only during this month, compared to 26% who do so both in December and during the other months, and even 47% who instead chooses to do so in the other eleven months rather than Christmas.

Furthermore, the more "generous" tend to limit themselves even less to the Christmas period . In fact, among those who donated more than € 100 during the calendar year, the percentage of those who say they donate only in December collapses to 7% . In short, if the average donor concentrates 24% of donations in this month, the donors of more substantial amounts are actually trying to distribute their benefit payments more.

The data may not surprise: very often, in fact, the non-profit organizations themselves try to exploit the last month of the year as an opportunity to encourage the start of ongoing donations that continue in the following months, thus ensuring better management and predictability of incoming flows. 

(YouGov Italy)

December 24, 2021

Source: https://it.yougov.com/news/2021/12/24/italiani-e-beneficenza-natale-piu-buoni-dicembre-m/

 

NORTH AMERICA

721-722-43-20/Polls

Increased Avoidance Of Care, Drugs Due To Cost Amid Pandemic

Amid sharply rising inflation, the percentage of U.S. adults who report forgoing treatment for a health problem in the prior three months due to the cost of care has increased to 30%, according to a major new study by West Health and Gallup. Reports of being unable to pay for prescribed medicine in the prior three months, in turn, have risen to 14% during the same time span.

Forgoing Care and Medicine in Past Three Months Due to Cost

Has there been a time in the last three months when you or a member of your household: (1) had a health problem, but you did not seek treatment due to the cost of care; (2) has been unable to pay for medicine or drugs that a doctor had prescribed for you because you did not have enough money to pay for them?

Did not seek treatment

Was unable to pay for medicine

%

%

Mar 2021

10

6

Jun 2021

14

7

Sep-Oct 2021

30

14

WEST HEALTH/GALLUP

These surveys were conducted by web March 15-21, June 14-20, and over successive field periods of Sept. 27-30 and Oct. 18-21, 2021, with adults aged 18 and older, living in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia via the Gallup Panel, a probability-based, non-opt-in panel of about 120,000 adults nationwide. The September/October results were obtained on a West Health survey solely asking about healthcare issues, whereas the March and June measurements were asked toward the end of Gallup's ongoing coronavirus pandemic tracking survey.

Full results of the new study can be found in the West Health-Gallup 2021 Healthcare in America Report, which provides a comprehensive look at Americans' changing attitudes, behaviors and trends related to healthcare during the second year of the COVID-19 pandemic. The report highlights the outsized effect the ongoing pandemic appears to have had on public attitudes toward healthcare.

COVID-19 Worsens Views of U.S. Healthcare System

Americans say the COVID-19 pandemic has increased their worry about the cost of healthcare services, and to a lesser extent, the cost of prescription drugs. About six in 10 U.S. adults (59%) report that they are more worried about the cost of healthcare services due to the pandemic, and another 45% say they are more worried about the cost of prescriptions. Less than 5% are now less worried about each because of COVID-19.

Changing Worries About Cost of Care, Medicine Due to COVID-19

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, are you now more worried or less worried about the cost of: (1) healthcare services in America; (2) prescription drugs in America?

More worried

About the same

Less worried

%

%

%

Cost of healthcare services

59

38

2

Cost of prescription drugs

45

52

3

WEST HEALTH/GALLUP

Amid substantial levels of worry about costs brought on by the pandemic, nearly half of Americans (48%) report that COVID-19 has worsened their view of the U.S. healthcare system, while 7% say COVID-19 has improved it. These deteriorating opinions hold true across age groups but are particularly acute among adults younger than 40.

COVID-19 Pandemic Worsens Views of U.S. Healthcare System, by Age

Has COVID-19 changed your view of the U.S. healthcare system?

U.S. adults

18-29

30-39

40-49

50-64

65+

%

%

%

%

%

%

Yes, my view of the U.S. healthcare system is better.

7

7

4

5

9

12

Yes, my view of the U.S. healthcare system is worse.

48

58

55

52

42

38

No, my view of the U.S. healthcare system has not changed.

40

32

38

39

44

44

Don't know

4

3

3

3

5

6

WEST HEALTH/GALLUP

The pandemic has also exposed perceived inequities in the healthcare system. Six in 10 Americans (60%) say that due to COVID-19, they are more concerned that some Americans have unequal access to quality care. This level of concern rises to 74% among Black Americans and to 68% among Hispanic Americans.

Six percent of Americans say they are less concerned about inequities because of COVID-19.

COVID-19 Pandemic Elevates Concerns of Inequities in U.S. Healthcare, by Subgroup

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, are you now more concerned or less concerned that some Americans have unequal access to quality healthcare services?

More concerned

Same level of concern

Less concerned

%

%

%

U.S. adults

60

34

6

Men

53

39

8

Women

67

30

4

White adults

56

39

6

Black adults

74

21

5

Hispanic adults

68

27

5

WEST HEALTH/GALLUP

Healthcare in America: Key Report Findings

The major new report from West Health and Gallup is based on the findings from a nationally representative sample of more than 6,600 American adults and is among the largest surveys measuring the state of healthcare in America during the second year of the pandemic. Additional key findings include:

  • An estimated 58 million U.S. adults (23%) report that healthcare costs are a major financial burden for their family. The financial burden is especially acute for younger Americans (under 50) and households with a yearly income below $48,000.
  • Seven in 10 Americans (71%) agree that their household pays too much for the quality of healthcare they receive.
  • Almost a third of adults (30%) say they would not have access to affordable care if they needed it today, up from 18% in February and 22% in June. In addition, 42% are concerned they will be unable to pay for needed healthcare services in the next year.
  • A racial divide exists in suffering serious consequences of skipping critical care. One in every 20 U.S. adults -- an estimated 12.7 million people -- report knowing a friend or family member who died this past year after not receiving treatment because they could not afford it. Black adults (8%) are twice as likely as White adults (4%) to know someone who died.
  • Two-thirds of Americans (66%) think voters have very little to no power in reducing the cost of healthcare in the U.S., but nearly nine in 10 think American businesses, corporations and Congress do.
  • However, more than two-thirds of Americans, regardless of party affiliation, say they are pessimistic about the federal government enacting policies to reduce healthcare costs in the coming year.

Implications

Several major indicators of Americans' wellbeing have worsened in recent months. An increasing percentage of adults are citing economic issues, including inflation, as the most important problem facing the nation. Gallup's Economic Confidence Index, in turn, fell from +2 in April to -25 in October, its lowest mark since April 2020. And satisfaction with the way things are going in the United States has slid from 34% to 23% during the same period. Dovetailing with these general attitudes, the worsening trends in Americans' ability to afford healthcare underscore the urgency of addressing the cost of care in the U.S. today and the dire projections for the coming years.

Many factors likely contribute to the recent changes, most of them pandemic-related. The cost of COVID-19 care for which consumers are responsible is rising, Kaiser Family Foundation recently reported, as 72% of major health insurers have moved to require members to pay more for COVID-19 treatment. That, coupled with the major summer surge in hospitalizations, has resulted in much more money paid out of pocket for affected Americans and much less money available for other household expenses.

Reports also suggest that deferred elective care from 2020 is now occurring in 2021, driving up healthcare utilization generally and increasing costs. And amid these issues is a worsening nurse shortage nationally that predated the pandemic but has significantly worsened because of it, forcing health systems in 2021 to increase salaries and hiring bonuses as a means of attracting and retaining nurses -- practices that can also result in greater costs for consumers.

The pandemic has likely played a significant role in the cost crisis in other ways, including disruptions in the global supply chain that have sharply increased inflation. The personal consumption expenditures (PCE) price index -- a key measure of inflation -- hit a 30-year high in August, according to the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, and has substantially outpaced more slowly rising American incomes. As consumers are spending more on basic food items, utilities and gasoline -- causing hardship for 45% of households -- the effects of simultaneously rising costs of care are likely exacerbating their ability to afford it. Medical devices and medical technology that are dependent on chips and semiconductors to power devices are increasing in price as well due to pandemic-driven global supply-chain shortages in 2021.

Money to spend on healthcare has also dwindled in recent months. According to a study by NPR/Robert Wood Johnson Foundation/Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 38% of U.S. households have suffered serious financial problems in the past few months.

Taken together, 2021 will likely be seen as a year when addressing the cost of care in the U.S. took on a new urgency and importance, setting the stage for policy leaders to choose between legislating real change or maintaining the status quo -- potentially further eroding the ability of Americans to afford both needed medicine and care.

(Gallup)

DECEMBER 14, 2021

Source: https://news.gallup.com/poll/357980/increased-avoidance-care-drugs-due-cost-amid-pandemic.aspx

 

721-722-43-21/Polls

Racial And Ethnic Differences Stand Out In The U S Gig Workforce

From delivering groceries to driving others where they need to go, some Americans are turning to gig jobs to earn money. In fact, 16% of U.S. adults have ever earned money through an online gig platform, including 9% who have done so in the past year, according to a Pew Research Center survey conducted in August 2021. But there are racial and ethnic differences when it comes to who takes on these jobs and the negative experiences some gig platform workers say they face.

Hispanic adults are more likely than other racial or ethnic groups to have done gig work: 30% of this group have ever earned money through an online gig platform, compared with 20% of Black adults, 19% of Asian adults and even smaller shares of White adults (12%).

A bar chart showing that overall and within age groups, Hispanic and Black Americans are more likely than White Americans to have ever earned money doing any online gig platform work

Taking on gig jobs also varies substantially by age, with adults under age 50 about twice as likely as those ages 50 and older to have ever done this type of work (22% vs. 10%). And while younger generations tend to be more racially and ethnically diverse compared with older ones, age alone does not fully account for the racial and ethnic gaps present within this workforce. Even among adults under the age of 50, Hispanic (34%) or Black Americans (27%) are more likely than those who are White (16%) to have earned money via an online gig platform.

While racial and ethnic gaps are present in each type of gig job measured in this survey, there are some tasks where these differences are more pronounced. For example, 16% of Hispanic adults say they have ever made deliveries from a restaurant or store for a delivery app, compared with one-in-ten Black adults, 7% of Asian adults and 4% of White adults. Hispanic adults are also more likely to report they have ever performed household tasks or run errands through gig work platforms than are Black, White or Asian adults.

There are also differences when it comes to earning money through two or more types of gig jobs. Gig platform workers who do not identify as White are more likely than those who are White to have earned money via multiple types of gig jobs (48% vs. 30%).

The findings on earning money via any gig platform work are mostly in line with the Center’s 2016 survey that found Hispanic or Black adults were more likely than White adults to have earned money through an online gig platform in the past year. (Due to sample size limitations, figures for Asian Americans could not be reported separately in 2016.) While the current figures are not directly comparable to the earlier study due to changes in question wording, it is clear that earning money through gig jobs continues to be more common for those who are not White than for those who are.

The rise of the gig economy has touched off wide-ranging debates about its impact on workers. While some credit these platforms with providing greater freedom and flexibility, others have raised concerns about perceived racial biases in customer rating systems as well as the lack of legal protections available to a workforce that Hispanic, Black or Asian adults are particularly likely to participate in.

A bar chart showing that non-White gig workers are more likely than those who are White to say they have at least sometimes felt unsafe or been sexually harassed on the job

The current survey finds majorities of White (76%) and non-White (81%) gig platform workers say their experience with taking on these jobs has been positive. However, those who are not White are more likely to report troubling encounters, specifically feeling unsafe or experiencing unwanted sexual advances, while on the job. (The NET non-White category for gig platform workers includes those who identify as Black, Asian, Hispanic, some other race or multiple races.)

Indeed, 41% of non-White gig workers say they have at least sometimes felt unsafe while completing jobs, compared with 28% of those who are White. Non-White gig workers are also about twice as likely as their White counterparts to say they have often felt unsafe while working (15% vs. 8%).

Additionally, gig workers who do not identify as White are more likely than those who do identify in this way to say they have often or sometimes experienced an unwanted sexual advance on the job (24% vs. 13%). (There are no statistically significant differences between White and non-White gig workers in reporting being treated rudely while completing jobs at least sometimes.)

A bar chart showing that 59% of non-White current or recent gig workers say they’ve been at least somewhat concerned about getting COVID-19 while completing jobs in past year

Some gig jobs may require contact with the public, thereby potentially increasing workers’ risk of exposure to COVID-19. Some 51% of gig workers who have earned money through these platforms over the past year say they have been at least somewhat concerned about getting the coronavirus while on the job in that time frame, according to the August survey.

Health concerns related to the pandemic are especially prevalent among non-White gig workers. Among those who have worked gig platform jobs in the past year, 59% of those who are non-White say they have been at least somewhat concerned over the past 12 months about getting the coronavirus while working these jobs, compared with 38% of those who are White. These racial and ethnic differences in gig workers’ on-the-job concerns largely mirror concerns about COVID-19 across racial and ethnic groups more generally.

(PEW)

DECEMBER 15, 2021

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/12/15/racial-and-ethnic-differences-stand-out-in-the-u-s-gig-workforce/

 

721-722-43-22/Polls

Overall, About Half (52%) Of Americans Say The U S Is One Of The Greatest Countries, Along With Some Others

Young people in the United States express far more skeptical views of America’s global standing than older adults. They are also more likely to say it would be acceptable if another country became as militarily powerful as the U.S., according to a Pew Research Center survey of U.S. adults conducted in July.

A bar chart showing that more than half of young Democrats say other countries are better than the U.S.

Overall, about half (52%) of Americans say the U.S. is “one of the greatest countries, along with some others.” Nearly a quarter say instead that the U.S. “stands above all other countries” (23%), while an identical share (23%) says “there are other countries that are better than the U.S.”

Opinions about the nation’s global standing have changed little since 2019. However, the share of adults saying there are other countries that are better than the U.S. is higher than it was a decade ago, with most of the increase coming among Democrats. 

There continue to be wide age differences in views of how America compares with other countries. Roughly four-in-ten adults ages 18 to 29 (42%) say there are other countries that are better than the U.S. – the highest share of any age group.

Age differences in these views are evident within both partisan coalitions. A majority (55%) of Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents under age 30 say there are other countries that are better than the U.S., as do 38% of those 30 to 49. By comparison, just 20% of Democrats ages 50 and older say this.

Among Republicans and Republican-leaning independents, 18% of adults under 30 say there are other countries that are superior to the U.S., compared with just 6% of Republicans 50 and older who take this view. But younger Republicans are considerably less likely than older Republicans to say the U.S. is the greatest nation: 19% of those ages 18 to 29 say this, compared with 31% of those 30 to 49, 41% of those 50 to 64 and 54% of those 65 and older. Over the past two years, Republicans under age 30 have grown less likely to say that the U.S. stands above all other countries in the world: 19% express this view today, down from 34% in 2019. A far larger share now say that the U.S. is one of the greatest nations, along with some others (47% in 2019 vs. 62% today).

Views of how the U.S. compares with other countries have long been divided along partisan lines – and the partisan gap in views of the United States’ standing today remains large. Today, about a third of Democrats say there are other countries that are better than the U.S.; just 11% of Republicans say the same. And while 38% of Republicans say the U.S. stands above all other countries, just 12% of Democrats say this. These shares are roughly on par with partisans’ views of the U.S. in 2019.

A bar chart showing wide partisan differences in U.S. views of America’s global standing

Differences in views of the country’s global standing extend beyond partisanship. Pew Research Center’s 2021 political typology revealed stark differences among typology groups in views of the U.S., even within partisan coalitions. For example, Faith and Flag Conservatives are the only group in which a majority (69%) says the U.S. stands above all other countries; clear majorities of those in three other GOP-oriented typology groups overwhelmingly say instead that the U.S. is among the greatest nations in the world, along with some others. Conversely, Progressive Left (75%) and Outsider Left (63%) are the only typology groups in which majorities say there are other countries better than the U.S. Most of those in other Democratic-oriented groups take the position that the U.S. is among a small number of greatest countries in the world.

When it comes to views of America’s status as a military superpower, a majority of adults (60%) say that U.S. policies should try to maintain the country’s position as the only military superpower, while 36% say it would be acceptable if another country were to become as militarily powerful.

A bar chart showing that in both parties, older adults are more likely than younger people to say U.S. policies should ensure U.S. position as the only military superpower

Mirroring age divides in attitudes about the United States’ global standing, younger adults are more likely than older adults to say it would be acceptable if another country became as militarily powerful as the U.S.

A majority (57%) of Democrats under age 30 say it would be acceptable if other nations became as militarily powerful as the U.S., while Democrats ages 30 to 49 are more divided on this question. Democrats 50 and older are more likely to say policies should try to keep it so the U.S. remains militarily superior than to say it would be acceptable for another country to gain similar military strength (58% vs. 37%).

Though a majority of Republicans across age groups say that U.S. policies should try to keep it so America is the only military superpower, 35% of Republicans under 30 say it would be acceptable if another country became as militarily powerful as the U.S., compared with smaller shares among older Republicans. 

(PEW)

DECEMBER 16, 2021

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/12/16/younger-americans-still-more-likely-than-older-adults-to-say-there-are-other-countries-better-than-the-u-s/

 

721-722-43-23/Polls

About Four-In-Ten Republicans And Republican-Leaning Independents (42%) Say Reagan Has Done The Best Job As President Over The Past 40 Years

When asked to name the president who has done the best job over the past 40 years, a majority of Democrats name Barack Obama. Republicans, by contrast, are divided between a president who served in the 1980s – Ronald Reagan – and the one who left office this year, Donald Trump.

A bar chart showing that Reagan, Trump viewed as best recent presidents by Republicans; Obama is by far the top choice among Democrats

About four-in-ten Republicans and Republican-leaning independents (42%) say Reagan has done the best job as president over the past 40 years, while slightly fewer (37%) say Trump has done the best job.

Around six-in-ten Democrats and Democratic leaners (59%) say Obama has done the best job as president of any president of the past 40 years. Far fewer name Bill Clinton (19%) or Joe Biden (5%), who will complete his first year in office next month.

Seven presidents have served in the last 40 years, four Republicans and three Democrats. Among U.S. adults overall, 35% say Obama has done the best job over this period, followed by Reagan (23%), Trump (17%) and Clinton (12%). Relatively small shares among both the general public and among Republicans name either George W. Bush or George H.W. Bush, according to the survey, conducted in September on Pew Research Center’s American Trends Panel.

Among Republicans, views on who has done the best job as president over the past four decades vary by race and ethnicity, age and other demographics.

A bar chart showing that older Republicans far more likely than younger Republicans to name Reagan as best recent president

Comparable shares of White and Hispanic Republicans say Trump has done the best job as president (38% and 33%, respectively). But White Republicans are more likely than Hispanic Republicans to name Reagan (45% vs. 28%), while a quarter of Hispanic Republicans (27%) say a Democratic president did the best job over the past 40 years. Black and Asian Republicans make up much smaller shares of the public; as a result, sample size limitations mean it is not possible to analyze their views. Half of Republicans ages 50 and older say Reagan has done the best job of any recent president, compared with 32% of those under age 50. There are smaller age differences in the shares of Republicans who name Trump. And while relatively small shares of Republicans in all age groups name Democratic presidents, those under 50 are more likely than those 50 and older to do so (19% vs. 3%).

Among Republicans who have not completed college, comparable shares name Trump and Reagan as the top recent presidents (40% and 38%, respectively). Among Republican college graduates, more say Reagan than Trump by a wide margin (51% vs. 29%).

Among Republicans who name Reagan or Trump as the best recent president, there are sizable differences in choices for the second-best president. Among Republicans who say Trump, about three-quarters (73%) say Reagan is the second-best president of the past 40 years. However, among those who point to Reagan, views of the second-best president are more varied: 54% say Trump, while 34% name other Republican presidents and 11% name Democratic presidents.

A bar chart showing that around three-quarters of young Democrats say Obama is the best recent president

Among Democrats, majorities across demographic groups view Obama as the best recent president. Still, younger Democrats are especially likely to say this, and Black Democrats are somewhat more likely than White and Hispanic Democrats to hold this view.

Nearly three-quarters of Democrats ages 18 to 29 (74%) say Obama has been the best president over the past 40 years, by far the highest share of any age group. And while 69% of Black Democrats name Obama, smaller majorities do so among Hispanic and White Democrats (56% each). Among Asian American Democrats, 64% name Obama.

(PEW)

DECEMBER 20, 2021

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/12/20/republicans-view-reagan-trump-as-best-recent-presidents/

 

721-722-43-24/Polls

43% Approve Of The Way President Joe Biden Is Handling His Job

President Joe Biden's job approval remains entrenched in the low 40s, having registered 42% or 43% in four separate Gallup polls since September, including 43% in a new December survey.

https://content.gallup.com/origin/gallupinc/GallupSpaces/Production/Cms/POLL/ysol2iojy0gkxa9-uaro8w.png

Line graph. Trend in President Joe Biden's job approval rating. In December 2021, 43% of U.S. adults approve of the job Biden is doing as president, similar to the past three months but lower than in readings taken in January through August.

Biden began his term with relatively strong approval in the high 50s and stayed above the 50% mark through June. In July, when U.S. coronavirus cases surged, his approval fell to 50% and stayed at about that level in August. Then, after the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan, it dropped to the low 40s, where it has remained since.

The new Dec. 1-16 poll was conducted as the U.S. was facing a renewed increase in coronavirus infections of both the delta and omicron variants of the virus. Inflation in the U.S. has reached levels not seen in decades, likely overshadowing positive economic indicators such as declining unemployment, solid economic growth and historically high stock values.

Though Biden's overall approval number is steady, his ratings by political subgroup have shown some movement, most notably among Democrats. Their 78% approval is significantly lower than in prior Gallup surveys, when it registered 90% or higher. It is unclear at this point if the current reading among Democrats represents an actual decline in approval among his party base or a one-time statistical outlier. Some other polls have recently shown declining Biden approval among Democrats.

While the current Gallup survey measured lower-than-usual Biden job approval among Democrats, his rating from independents, 40%, is slightly higher than it has been. In the September to November surveys, between 34% and 37% of independents approved of the way Biden was handling his job.

The president's 5% approval among Republicans is similar to recent measures among this group.

At the same time that Biden's rating fell among Democrats, the poll found a slightly greater proportion of poll respondents identifying politically as Democrats (30%) than has been the case recently. Gallup has not found this high a proportion of Americans identifying as Democrats since June. Thus, even if Democrats are slightly less positive toward Biden, if more Americans are identifying as Democrats, it could explain why his overall job approval rating is steady in the latest survey, even as his approval among Democrats is lower.

Congress' Job Approval at 23%

As is typically the case, Congress has a lower job approval rating -- 23% -- than the president does. In the past three months, Congress' approval rating has slumped after being in the mid-20s to mid-30s earlier this year. This included a 36% reading in March, which was the highest Gallup has measured for the institution since 2009.

https://content.gallup.com/origin/gallupinc/GallupSpaces/Production/Cms/POLL/uaenfrcmzemgusf1munqnq.png

Line graph. Job approval of Congress in 2021. From February through May 2021, more than 30% of Americans approved of the job Congress was doing. Between June and September, approval was slightly lower, ranging between 26% and 28%. Since October, approval has dipped to between 20% and 23%.

The retreat in congressional approval ratings is being led by Democrats. Earlier this year, as many as 61% of Democrats approved of Congress, including 55% in September. During the past three months, Congress' approval among Democrats has been in the 30% range, including 36% this month.

Though Congress last month passed the bipartisan infrastructure bill after lengthy negotiations in the House, the "Build Back Better" legislation that focuses on climate change and social spending programs has stalled in the Senate after the House passed a version of the bill in November. Passage of that latter bill appears to be in jeopardy, with Sen. Joe Manchin, the swing vote in the Senate, announcing this week that he would not vote for it.

Twenty-two percent of independents and 7% of Republicans currently approve of the way Congress is handling its job.

Bottom Line

After Americans were generally positive about Biden's performance at the start of his presidency, they have been much more critical since September. His approval ratings in the low 40s are similar to those registered by former Presidents Donald Trump and Barack Obama for long stretches of their presidencies. The three most recent presidents have governed in an era of heightened partisanship, in which supporters of the opposition party are loath to express positive opinions of the Oval Office occupant, making it difficult for these presidents to register high overall approval ratings. Much of the movement that does occur in job ratings occurs among political independents. The group can be hard to win back once things go in a negative direction, as occurred for Biden in the late summer and early fall.

(Gallup)

DECEMBER 21, 2021

Source: https://news.gallup.com/poll/358343/joe-biden-job-approval-rating-steady-december.aspx

 

721-722-43-25/Polls

Overall, About Half Of U S Adults (48%) Say That Most Things In Society Can Be Clearly Divided Into Good And Evil

Many major religions have clear teachings about good and evil in the world. For example, the Abrahamic traditions – Judaism, Christianity and Islam – use concepts such as God and the devil or heaven and hell to illustrate this dichotomy.

A bar chart showing that more than half of U.S. Christians say most things in society can be clearly divided into good and evil

It may be somewhat unsurprising, then, that highly religious Americans are much more likely to see society in those terms, while nonreligious people tend to see more ambiguity, according to a recent Pew Research Center survey.

Overall, about half of U.S. adults (48%) say that most things in society can be clearly divided into good and evil, while the other half (50%) say that most things in society are too complicated to be categorized this way. However, there are stark differences in opinion based on respondents’ religious affiliation and how religious they are.

For example, U.S. Christians are much more likely than religiously unaffiliated Americans to say that most things in society can be clearly divided into good and evil (54% vs. 37%). Nearly two-thirds of White evangelical Protestants (64%) say this, as do 57% of Black Protestants. Members of these two groups also attend religious services and pray at higher rates than other U.S. adults.

By comparison, only around half of U.S. Catholics (49%) and White Protestants who do not identify as evangelical (47%) say that most things in society can be clearly divided into good and evil.

Among those who identify their religion as “nothing in particular,” 43% say that most things in society can be clearly divided into good and evil. But far fewer atheists (22%) and agnostics (29%) say the same. Combined, these three groups make up the nation’s religiously unaffiliated population, also known as religious “nones”; overall, a majority of these unaffiliated Americans (62%) say most things in society are too complicated to be divided into good and evil.

Due to sample size limitations, this analysis does not include some smaller religious groups who were asked this question, such as Jewish and Muslim Americans.

Differences over whether most things in society can be divided into good and evil also are apparent when looking at various measures of religious observance. Highly religious Americans – regardless of their religious affiliation – are more likely to see society in terms of good and evil. For instance, U.S. adults who say they attend religious services at least once a week are more likely than those who seldom or never attend services to give this response (59% vs. 42%). And there are similar patterns when it comes to the self-professed importance of religion in people’s lives and their prayer habits.

Previous Pew Research Center surveys have found that many highly religious people look to God as a marker of good and evil and say that it is necessary to believe in God in order to be a moral person.

Even within religious groups, Democrats and Republicans have different attitudes about good and evil

Views about good and evil also vary by political party. Roughly six-in-ten Republicans and independents who lean toward the Republican Party (59%) say that most things in society can be clearly divided into good and evil, compared with 38% of Democrats and Democratic leaners.

A bar chart showing that Republicans differ by religious affiliation over whether most things in society can be divided into good, evil

Religious groups differ from one another in their political makeup. For example, White evangelical Protestants are more likely to be Republicans, while atheists and agnostics tend to align with the Democratic Party. Still, party identification does not fully explain the religious differences described in this analysis; within both parties, there are large differences across religious groups.

For instance, Republican Christians are more likely than Republican “nones” to say that most things in society can be clearly divided into good and evil (63% vs. 48%). Similarly, Democratic Christians are more likely than Democratic “nones” to give that response (43% vs. 31%).

The reverse pattern is also true: Religious differences do not entirely account for the political gaps in views of good and evil. This is evidenced by the fact that Catholic Republicans are more likely than Catholic Democrats to see clear distinctions between good and evil (57% vs. 43%), a pattern that also holds true among Protestants.

(PEW)

DECEMBER 21, 2021

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/12/21/christians-religiously-unaffiliated-differ-on-whether-most-things-in-society-can-be-divided-into-good-evil/

 

721-722-43-26/Polls

Many U S Workers Are Seeing Bigger Paychecks In Pandemic Era, But Gains Aren’t Spread Evenly

The COVID-19 pandemic is reshaping the U.S. labor market more than any single event since at least the Great Recession of 2007-09 and the financial panic that accompanied it. Employers shed nearly 20 million jobs between March and April 2020, according to government data, and payroll employment has yet to recover to pre-pandemic levels. Workers are quitting their jobs at a record pace, particularly in lower-paid sectors such as retail and food service, and many employers are scrambling to lure replacements with raises and bonuses.

At least, that’s the broad picture. But those wage gains have been distributed unevenly throughout the workforce, with workers in some sectors and industries seeing far smaller gains than those in others. And workers’ real purchasing power has been eroded by sharply higher inflation. (This analysis focuses on average weekly wages and employment levels in the private sector, where around 85% of Americans work.)

Almost two-thirds of U.S. private sector payroll workers (63.6%) work in industries where the average weekly wage in the second quarter of 2021 was at least 5% higher than it was in the second quarter of 2020, according to the most recently available data from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages, a product of the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics.

A bar chart showing that since the lockdown spring of 2020, hospitality sector wages have risen the most of all industries

The “accommodation and food services” sector – including restaurants, bars, hotels and the like – had the biggest increase in average weekly wages since the second quarter of 2020, when much of the sector was either shut down or sharply curtailed because of the pandemic. The average wage for workers in this sector rose 18.4%, to $482 a week, after dropping 4.9% between the second quarter of 2019 and the same period in 2020. (Over that same period, average employment in the sector plummeted 38%.) But despite the recent wage increases, this was still the lowest-paying sector.

The two sectors with the next biggest wage gains were information (which includes, among other industries, software publishing and “internet publishing and web search portals”) and company management. These are also the highest-paying sectors overall.

Average weekly wages in the information sector rose 12.3%, to $2,740, between the second quarter of 2020 and the second quarter of 2021 – almost as much as they rose in the corresponding 2019-20 period. Management pay rose an average 12%, to $2,513 a week, between mid-2020 and mid-2021, after staying nearly flat in the year-earlier period.

Pandemic-related job losses in the information and management sectors weren’t just considerably smaller than in accommodation and food services – perhaps because many more information and management workers could work from home – but by this year’s second quarter, those two high-paying sectors had regained most of the workers they lost. By contrast, employment in accommodation and food services was still 15% below its level in the second quarter of 2019.

To get a more detailed view of pay patterns, we drilled down from broad sectors and looked at detailed industries that employed more than 100,000 people. (Small industries are more prone to dramatic fluctuations in both pay and workforce: The industry with the biggest average wage gain between the second quarters of 2020 and 2021, “other traveler accommodation,” employs only around 30,000-35,000 people in bed-and-breakfasts, youth hostels and other non-hotel types of lodging.) Also, it’s important to note that, especially at the industry level, reported wage changes can be affected by changes in the composition of that specific workforce.

Of that subgroup of industries, which accounts for 106.6 million jobs, the wage growth leader was financial transaction processing and clearing. Average pay for the 126,000 or so people in that industry more than doubled between the second quarter of 2020 and the second quarter of 2021, from $2,110 to $4,247. Other leading industries included local messengers and delivery people (up 92.6%), new car dealers (up 40.4%) and dentists’ offices (up 27.6%).

A bar chart showing the biggest increases and declines in average industry wages

Many of the industries in this subgroup that notched the biggest wage gains between the second quarter of 2020 and the second quarter of 2021 had experienced wage declines during the early months of the pandemic. In 2020’s second quarter, for example, average wages for dental workers were 13.3% below their level a year earlier.

For that reason, we also decided to compare wages in the second quarter of 2021 against the same quarter in 2019, to see where the biggest overall gains have been. The wage winners this time were local messengers and delivery people, whose average weekly wage more than doubled over the period in question – from $680 to $1,437. Financial transaction processing and clearing was close behind, with a two-year gain of 96.6%. Further back were computer and peripheral equipment manufacturing (up 40.1%), new car dealers (38.5%) and a nonbank lending category dominated by mortgage lenders (up almost 35%).

(PEW)

DECEMBER 22, 2021

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/12/22/many-u-s-workers-are-seeing-bigger-paychecks-in-pandemic-era-but-gains-arent-spread-evenly/

 

721-722-43-27/Polls

Majority (56%) Of Canadians Support Another Lockdown To Stop The Spread Of Omicron

With the Omicron variant of COVID-19 spreading quickly and stoking worries of a sharp rise in case counts and hospitalizations, a new Ipsos poll conducted on behalf of Global News reveals that a majority (56%) of Canadians agree (20% strongly/36% somewhat) that we should have another lockdown to help stop the spread of the Omicron variant. Conversely, 44% oppose (18% strongly/26% somewhat) another round of lockdowns. Support is highest in Quebec (62%), British Columbia (61%), Atlantic Canada (60%) and Saskatchewan and Manitoba (59%) and lower in Ontario (53%) and, especially, Alberta (44%).

Although a majority still support lockdown measures, support is dropping. In July of 2021, 69% said they would support more lockdown measures if a fourth wave of the pandemic arose, which dropped to 63% in September, and is now just 56% now that the Omicron wave is upon us.  

Canadians believe that Omicron will further delay to the return to normal, particularly when it comes to the ability to travel:

  • Eight in ten (82%) agree (35% strongly/47% somewhat) that the Omicron variant will delay things getting back to normal
  • Eight in ten (80%) agree (47% strongly/33% somewhat) that they would cancel their travel plans if COVID-19 gets any worse.
  • Nearly four in ten (37%) however take a more stubborn approach to travel, agreeing (11% strongly/25% somewhat) that they will travel next year, regardless of fluctuating coronavirus cases.

Canadians have begun rolling up their sleeves yet again to get their COVID booster shots, and the Prime Minister has encouraged the premiers to expedite their delivery of the vaccine within their provinces. But many appear to be willing to wait for their 3rd shot if it means that Canada could share its vaccine supply with low-income countries. Indeed, seven in ten (69%) agree (25% strongly/44% somewhat) that they would be willing to wait, while three in ten (31%) disagree (11% strongly/21% somewhat) with postponing. Those in Atlantic Canada (78%) and Quebec (75%) are most likely to say they’d be fine giving their immediate booster shots to lower-income countries, while those in Ontario (69%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (64%), Alberta (62%) and British Columbia (59%) are less inclined. Those aged 18-34 (75%) are also more likely than those aged 35-54 (70%) or 55+ (62%) to hold this position.

Canadians Say Public Health Officials Outperforming Political Leaders in Response to COVID-19

Reflecting on the performance of key figures over the past year in their handling of the COVID-19 pandemic, the poll reveals that some public health officials have outperformed their political masters in the eyes of Canadians. Dr. Theresa Tam has received a higher approval rating than the collective efforts of Canada’s provincial premiers and the Prime Minister, while Canadians’ assessment of Dr. Anthony Fauci surpasses that of President Joe Biden. Also interesting is that Canadians’ assessment of President Biden’s handling of the pandemic is more positive than Prime Minister Trudeau’s.

Approval of Handling of the COVID-19 Crisis

Person

% approve (strongly/somewhat);

% disapprove (strongly/somewhat)

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau

49% approve (11%/38%); 51% disapprove (25%/26%)

Provincial Premiers

57% approve (14%/43%); 43% disapprove (19%/25%)

Dr. Theresa Tam

64% approve (15%/49%); 36% disapprove (13%/23%)

President Joe Biden

58% approve (11%/47%); 42% disapprove (15%/28%)

Dr. Anthony Fauci

64% approve (16%/48%); 36% disapprove (12%/25%)

 

Compared to May of 2021, the Prime Minister’s COVID-specific approval rating is down by 5 points to 49%, while collectively the premiers’ approval rating is down just 2 points. The Premier of Quebec (75%, -1) receives the highest approval ratings among his first minister colleagues, followed by the Premiers of British Columbia (63%, -13), Atlantic Canada (61%, -7), Ontario (52%, +2), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (37%, -7) and Alberta (33%, +2).

(Ipsos Canada)

17 December 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-ca/news-polls/majority-support-another-lockdown-stop-omnicron

 

721-722-43-28/Polls

Only Half (50%) Of Canadians Currently Working From Home Say They Expect To Return To The Office Regularly In 2022

As the end of the year approaches, the future of the workplace remains uncertain heading into 2022 as only one half (50%) of Canadians currently working from home envision themselves returning to the office with any regularity in 2022, according to a new Ipsos poll conducted on behalf of Global News.

The poll also asked working Canadians about their experiences in 2021 and what their expectations and feelings are about 2022, given the ever-changing contextual situation in Canada. Overall, 64% of working Canadians agree (15% strongly/49% somewhat) that they achieved a better work-life balance in 2021, led by Quebecers (77%) and followed by those living in Atlantic Canada (69%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (68%), British Columbia (60%), Ontario (60%) and Alberta (49%).

However, it appears that many are still struggling to achieve that balance, since four in ten (39%) workers agree that they would be fine earning 20% less money if it meant they could work 20% fewer hours than they do now. Workers aged 18-34 (49%) are most likely to hold this position, followed by those aged 35-54 (35%) and 55+ (34%).

The nature of work continued to evolve in 2021, with 9% saying they started working remotely/from home, 7% returning to the office, and 15% continuing to work from home for an extended period of time. Moreover, among the 11% who started a new job, 72% agree that it was their choice to do so, while 28% disagree that it was their own decision, suggesting that they were laid off, fired, or needed to start a second job to make ends meet. Overall, 6% said they lost their job and 4% said they had to find a second or third job.

Those working from home appear to have enjoyed the flexibility and want to continue the option to work from home on a regular basis, even if they have missed their colleagues:

  • 88% agree that they have enjoyed working from home more often in 2021, while just 12% disagree.
  • 58% agree that they miss being with their colleagues in person, while 42% apparently don’t.
  • 50% agree that they expect to return to the office on a regular basis in 2022, while 50% disagree.
  • Only 44% agree that they want to return to the office on a regular basis in 2022, while a majority (56%) disagrees that they do.

Work Experiences in 2021

Experience

% of Canadians

Lost job

6%

Got a new job

11%

Started a second or third job

4%

Retrained for a new career or pursued further training for my current job

5%

Worked from home or an extended period of time

15%

Returned to working at the office

7%

Started working remotely/from home

9%

 

(Ipsos Canada)

26 December 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-ca/news-polls/only-half-of-Canadians-say-they-expect-to-return-to-office

 

AUSTRALIA

721-722-43-29/Polls

Eight In Ten Australians Expect A Better Year In 2022

People around the world are optimistic that 2022 will be a better year following a challenging 2021 and in Australia 82% expect a better year, according to a new Ipsos' Global Advisor survey in 33 countries.

Of the nine questions where Ipsos has trend data since 2020, four show significant change in attitudes among respondents, indicating a more optimistic view of what 2022 will bring. Nonetheless, concerns about the environment and rising prices persist. And while most expect greater COVID vaccination rates around the world, half (47%) expect a new deadly strain of the virus to appear.

Key Australian highlights:

  • 85% of Australians said 2021 was a bad year, but 2020 was worse
  • 69% of Australians say the global economy will be better next year, however 77% say prices will rise higher than incomes here
  • Almost seven in ten Australians say there will be more extreme weather events here in 2022 compared to 2021 as a consequence of climate change
  • Three quarters of Australians expect cities to get busier in 2022 as people return to offices regularly
  • Half of Australians say it is likely that strict rules for large technology companies will be introduced by the Government.

Ipsos Australia Director, David Elliott, said: “Despite another tough year, particularly after it started relatively optimistically, Australians continue to show their positivity, optimism and ability to bounce back.  While there is optimism about 2022 and the global economy, there is also a high proportion who are concerned about prices rising faster than incomes, which perhaps isn’t that surprising as Australia’s slow wage growth is well documented and discussed.

“The other stand out, but not a surprise is that Australia ranked third highest among the countries surveyed at 68% in terms of believing there will be more extreme weather events in Australia in 2022 than there were in 2021.  Across a number of our studies, we continue to see growing concerns with climate change and people wanting to know how the Government plans to tackle it.”

Outlook 2022

Hope springs eternal. More than eight in 10 Australians (82%), compared to the global average of 77%, expect a better year in 2022. It ranges from 54% of Japanese saying they are optimistic that 2022 will be a better year for them than it was in 2021, to 94% of Chinese.

2021 seemed to have been a better year than 2020 for most countries, although 85% of Australians said it was a bad year. When asked in 2020, 90% said 2020 was a bad year for their country. This year when asked about 2021 this has dropped to 77% globally.

Only 56% say 2021 was bad for them and their families - down from 90% last year and Australia was close to the global average at 59%.

As in most years, three in four say they will make some personal resolutions to do some specific things for themselves or others in 2022, with 72% of those in Australia. Japan (44%) and Sweden (23%) are the only surveyed countries where only a minority will be making resolutions for the new year.

Overall, there is more optimism about the global economy. Three in five around the world agree the global economy will be stronger next year, compared to 54% in 2020. In Australia, the figure was 69%.

COVID-19

More than half of people (56%) believe that more than 80% of the world’s population will receive at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine in 2022. In Australia, 65% of people agree with this statement. Latin Americans are highly optimistic, with figures rising to 81% in Peru, 76% in Brazil, and 69% in Chile. Europeans are more sceptical about wider vaccine distribution, where figures fall to 42% in France, 38% in Switzerland and 33% in Germany.

The environment

Most people around the world believe in 2022 we will see more climate change consequences, with 60% saying is likely there will be more extreme weather events in their country in 2022 than there were in 2021. Australia ranked third highest among the countries surveyed at 68%, no doubt due to the bushfires, floods, and droughts across the country.

In addition, 45% expect to see people flying less than they did in 2019. Australia ranked higher than the global average, at 57%. Those in Asia are more confident that this is likely to be the case, with 68% in China, 67% in Singapore and 66% in Malaysia. 

Economics

A clear majority (75%) expect prices in their countries to increase faster than incomes. Australia was close to the global average at 77%. While most people around the world think this is likely to happen, only a third (33%) think so in Japan, which has been subject to decades of deflation.

Only a third (35%) globally expect to see stock markets around the world crashing and Australia was again close to the global average at 38%. Globally, people have greater expectations for stock market stability in 2022 than they did in 2021, when 40% said major stock markets around the world were likely to crash.

Society

71% anticipate seeing city centres in their countries becoming busy again as people get back to working in offices on a regular basis. Almost eight in 10 Australians agreed with this statement, at 76%. Nine in ten (87%) in China say this is likely to happen. People in South America have similar expectations with four in five (78%) in Argentina, Brazil and Colombia expecting their city centres to be busy again.

Globally, around three in ten (28%) say is likely that people in their country will become more tolerant of each other and almost one third (32%) of Australians agree. While this rises to 60% in India, only 9% of French think this is likely to happen.

Technology

More than half (57%) say it is likely many more people will live their lives in a virtual world. Australians were more sceptical, with 49% agreeing with this statement. This figure rises to almost eight in ten (77%) in Turkey, but falls to 43% in Great Britain, 36% in Saudi Arabia and only 18% in Japan.

Four in ten (38%) think it is likely that strict rules for large technology companies will be introduced by the Government in their country, and from Ipsos’ Global Trends Survey 2021 83% think social media companies have too much power. Almost half of Australians (49%) said rules would be introduced by Government, influenced by the ACCC investigation and subsequent proposed legislation for the global technology giants.

Global threats

Four in ten expect a natural disaster to hit a major city in their country which was higher in Australia at 49%. This rises to 63% in the US and 58% in Turkey. In contrast, Scandinavians are more optimistic and only a minority expect a natural disaster to hit in Sweden (24%) and Denmark (21%) respectively.

Four in 10 (38%) say it is likely hackers from a foreign government will cause a global IT shutdown, which was again higher in Australia at 44%.

Armageddon? One in three (34%) globally think is likely that nuclear weapons will be used in a conflict somewhere in the world and Australia was close to the global average at 38%. This figure rises to half (52%) of people in Turkey.

One in seven (14%) expect aliens to visit the earth in 2022, but as ever, Indians are most likely to expect visitors from outer space. Only 17% of Australians expect an alien visit.

(Ipsos Australia)

19 December 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-au/eight-ten-australians-expect-better-year-2022

 

721-722-43-30/Polls

Only 37% Of Australians Expect 2022 Will Be ‘Better’ Than 2021 – Down 22% Points On A Year Ago

A special Roy Morgan web survey taken in late November shows only 37% of Australians think 2022 will be ‘better’ than 2021, down a large 22% points from when the same question was asked a year ago in late 2020.

However, fewer than a quarter of Australians, 23%, think 2022 will be ‘worse’ than 2021, although this is up 13% points on a year ago. Nearly a third of Australians are hedging their bets on next year with 31% (up 14% points on a year ago) who say 2022 will be ‘the same’ and 9% (down 5% points) don’t know.

Analysing by State shows people in Victoria (46%) and New South Wales (44%) are easily the most positive about the new year with clear pluralities in both States expecting 2022 will be ‘better’ than 2021.

However, this optimism is not as widespread in other States with only 29% of people in Queensland, 24% of people in Western Australia, 22% of people in South Australia and 20% of people in Tasmania who say 2022 will be ‘better’ than 2021. In three States, Queensland, South Australia and Tasmania, more people say 2022 will be ‘worse’ than 2021.

This special Roy Morgan web survey was conducted in late November with a cross-section of 1,184 Australians aged 18+.


Do you think next year will be ‘Better’ or ‘Worse’ – long-term trend (1980-2021)

Next Year - 'Better' or 'Worse'

Source: Roy Morgan telephone, SMS and web surveys in Australia 1980-2020 with an average of 1,000 Australians aged 18+ interviewed each year.
Question: “As far as you are concerned, do you think that 2022 will be better, worse, or the same as 2021?”



Older Australians are the most positive about 2022 – 52% expect it will be ‘better’ than 2021

Analysing by age group shows it is older Australians who are clearly the most positive about 2022. Australians aged 65+ is the only age group in which a majority of people, 52%, say 2022 will be ‘better’ than 2021 compared to only 17% that say it will be ‘worse’.

The second most positive are at the other end of the age scale with 42% of Australians aged 18-24 who say 2022 will be ‘better’ than 2021 compared to 29% who say it will be ‘worse’.

Australians in other groups are also more positive than negative about next year – but only just. Only around a third of Australians aged 25-34 (29%), 35-49 (33%) or 50-64 (31%) say 2022 will be ‘better’ than 2021 while around a quarter say it will be worse: 25-34 (24%), 35-49 (26%) and 50-64 (23%).

When it comes to the two genders men are more positive about next year than women with 40% of men who expect 2022 will be ‘better’ than 2021 compared to only 34% of women. There are slightly more women (25%) that say 2022 will be ‘worse’ than 2021 than men (22%).

 

Analysis by Age & Gender – Next Year ‘Better’ or ‘Worse’

Nest Year - 'Better' or 'Worse' - By Gender & Age

Source: This special Roy Morgan web survey was conducted in late November with a cross-section of 1,184 Australians aged 18+.

 

Total
Australia

Gender

Age

Men

Women

18-24

25-34

35-49

50-64

65+

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

Better

37

40

34

42

29

33

31

52

Same

31

31

30

17

37

35

33

23

Worse

23

22

25

29

24

26

23

17

Don’t know

9

7

11

12

10

6

13

8

TOTAL

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

 

Victorians are the most positive about 2022 – after four lockdowns in 2021

Analysing by State shows people in Victoria (46%) and New South Wales (44%) are clearly the most positive about the new year with clear pluralities in both States expecting 2022 will be ‘better’ than 2021. This is hardly surprising given the long lockdowns experienced during 2021 in both Melbourne (108 days) and Sydney (107 days).

In only one other State, Western Australia, are people more positive about 2022 than negative. Just under a quarter of people in Western Australia (24%) expect 2022 will be ‘better’ than 2021 compared to 23% that say 2022 will be ‘worse’. Western Australia is now the only State which continues to have closed domestic borders to most of the rest of Australia.

In other States that have largely avoided COVID-19 so far but are now experiencing rising cases after re-opening their borders in recent weeks there are more people who say 2022 will be ‘worse’ than ‘better’.

Over a third of people in Tasmania (35%) say 2022 will be ‘worse’ than 2021 and this is followed by around a third of people in South Australia (32%) and Queensland (30%).

Respondents in Australia’s Capital Cities (38%) are slightly more positive about 2022 being ‘better’ than 2021 compared to those in Country Regions (35%).

 

Analysis by States & Regions – Next Year ‘Better’ or ‘Worse’

Next Year - 'Better' or 'Worse' - By State & Region

Source: This special Roy Morgan web survey was conducted in late November with a cross-section of 1,184 Australians aged 18+.

 

City/ Country

States

Total
Australia

Capital
Cities

Country
Areas

NSW

VIC

QLD

WA

SA

TAS

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

Better

37

38

35

44

46

29

24

22

20

Same

31

31

30

28

25

30

45

35

33

Worse

23

23

24

19

21

30

23

32

35

Don’t know

9

8

11

9

8

11

8

11

12

TOTAL

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

 

Michele Levine, Chief Executive Officer, Roy Morgan, says the emergence of the highly infectious ‘Omicron variant’ in recent weeks has unfortunately put paid to hopes that 2022 would be the year Australians returned to a pre-pandemic sense of ‘normality’:

“Australians are set to enter 2022 in a mixed state-of-mind with new outbreaks of COVID-19 spreading rapidly in New South Wales and Victoria over the last week as restrictions have been eased in both States in the run-up to Christmas.

“A bare plurality of 37% of Australians say 2022 will be ‘better’ than 2021, down 22% points from a year ago. Just under a quarter of Australians, 23% (up 13% points), expect 2022 will be ‘worse’ than 2021 while just under a third, 31%, say it will be ‘the same’ and only 9% don’t know.

“The numbers are less encouraging than a year ago as Australia enjoyed a relatively COVID-free summer in 2020/21 and with new vaccines set to arrive from February 2021 it appeared the COVID-19 pandemic might soon be over. That hope proved not to be the case with extended lockdowns this year in New South Wales, Victoria and the ACT.

“Perhaps unsurprisingly, these States are the most positive about 2022 being ‘better’ than 2021 and nearly half of the people in Victoria (46%) and New South Wales (44%) say next year will be ‘better’ than this year. However, in the four smaller States there are more people inclined to say next year will be ‘worse’ than this year – especially in South Australia and Tasmania which have been largely COVID-free throughout the pandemic.

“There are considerable uncertainties about the economic outlook for next year with Inflation Expectations now at a seven-year high of 4.9% in November. The threat of inflation looms over 2022 as supply chain issues, as well as strong demand worldwide as we – hopefully – emerge from the pandemic put upward pressure on prices. In Australia there is also the added uncertainty of a Federal Election with campaigning set to dominate the first half of next year and the country’s first ‘Hung Parliament’ for a decade remains a clear possibility.

“One of the most interesting aspects of the research is the breakdown by age. The most positive Australians are the oldest with a majority of 52% of people aged 65+ saying they expect 2022 will be ‘better’ than 2021. This compares to 42% of those aged 18-24 and only around a third of people in the middle: 25-34 (29%), 35-49 (33%) and 50-64 (31%).

“Older Australians are the most heavily vaccinated cohort and perhaps this helps underlie their confidence about the year ahead, however the new outbreaks of COVID-19 in NSW, Victoria and elsewhere suggest they may also have the most to worry about.

“To deal with these new outbreaks Australians are being advised to book in a ‘booster shot’ five months after receiving their second dose. Already over 1 million Australians have now received their first ‘booster shot’ which will significantly restore their immunity levels.

“During the past two years the only ‘certainty’ we have had during the pandemic has been dealing with uncertainty. Unfortunately for those who believed that achieving a high vaccination rate of over 90% of the population would lead to a return to normality as we knew it pre-pandemic, the last few weeks with the emergence of the ‘Omicron variant’ shows there will still be a large degree of uncertainty going forward into 2022.”

 

Finding No. 8884– This special Roy Morgan web survey was conducted with a representative cross-section of 1,184 Australians on November 25 – 28, 2021. They were asked “Do you think that 2022 will be better, worse, or the same as 2021?”

 

Next Year – Better or Worse? (Australia)

“As far as you are concerned, do you think that 2022 will be better, worse, or the same as 2021?”

1980

1981

1982

1983

1984

1985

1986

1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

Better

42

43