BUSINESS & POLITICS IN THE WORLD

 

GLOBAL OPINION REPORT NO. 723

 

 

Week: December 07, 2021 –January 02, 2022

 

Presentation: January 07, 2022

 

 

Contents

 

723-43-16/Commentary: Women Are More Likely Than Men To Feel Burned Out At Work, 34% Vs 26%, The Gap Has Only Widened During The Pandemic. 2

SUMMARY OF POLLS. 5

ASIA   9

9 Out Of 10 People Are Aware Of The Omicron Variant 9

AFRICA.. 11

Most Emaswati (78%) “Agree” Or “Strongly Agree” That Lockdown Restrictions Were Necessary To Limit The Spread Of COVID-19. 11

WEST EUROPE.. 14

One In Four Britons Have Never Heard Of The Government’s Flagship ‘Levelling Up’ Strategy. 14

Seven In Ten (70%) Britons Say They Have A Very Strong (39%) Or Fairly Strong (31%) Brexit Identity. 16

One In Seven Brits Is Making A New Year's Resolution This Year - Compared To One In Nine Who Did For 2021  19

One In Eight Drinkers Plan To Try And Stay Sober For The First Month Of New Year 21

Britain's Best Of 2021. 22

NORTH AMERICA.. 30

Women Are More Likely Than Men To Feel Burned Out At Work, 34% Vs 26%, The Gap Has Only Widened During The Pandemic. 30

Generation Z and millennials less engaged and more stressed at work. 33

Over Half Of Americans Believe The Country's Economy Is Headed In The Wrong Direction. 36

American Have Mixed Expectations On The Start Of New Year 37

Finances, Forecasts And Fireworks: Four In Ten (41%) Canadians Are Hailing In The New Year With A Resolution About Their Financial Wellbeing. 41

Canadians Remain Resilient: Despite The Roller Coaster Of 2021, Most Canadians Have A Positive Outlook On Their Personal Happiness, Health Closing Out The Year 43

MULTICOUNTRY STUDIES. 47

Buzzing Car Brands Among American And British Gamers. 47

Circa 2022 Will Be Better Than 2021, 71% Agree Globally. 49

 


 

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

 

This weekly report consists of fifteen surveys. The report includes two multi-country studies from different states across the globe.

 

723-43-16/Commentary: Women Are More Likely Than Men To Feel Burned Out At Work, 34% Vs 26%, The Gap Has Only Widened During The Pandemic

Working women report more on-the-job burnout than working men do, and the gap has only widened during the pandemic.

In 2019, 30% of women and 27% of men said they "always" or "very often" felt burned out at work. That three-percentage-point gap expanded to 12 points in the pandemic-era months of 2020, from March to December, and has averaged eight points in 2021 -- 34% of women and 26% of men this year have reported feeling burned out.

https://content.gallup.com/origin/gallupinc/GallupSpaces/Production/Cms/WORKPLACEV9CMS/5smsh_6mfkmlooopsw_xxg.png

Line graph. Trend in percentage of U.S. employees who always or very often feel burned out at work, by gender. Burnout among women was 30% in 2019 but expanded to 34% in 2020 and remains 34% in 2021. Burnout among men was 27% in 2019, fell to 22% in 2020 and is 26% in 2021.

The expanded gender gap in worker burnout seen during the pandemic is the result of two shifts since 2019 -- increased burnout among women and decreased burnout among men. Burnout among men has varied, dipping significantly to 22% in 2020 and then rising to 26% this year, but is still just below the 27% recorded in 2019. By contrast, women's burnout increased four points to 34% in 2020 and remains at that level in 2021.

Why Does the Burnout Gender Gap Matter, and What Is Contributing to It?

To be clear, burnout among working men is still far too common, with about one in four currently experiencing it on a regular basis. Employees who reach this breaking point of always or very often feeling burned out at work are 23% more likely to visit the emergency room, 63% more likely to take a sick day and 2.6 times as likely to leave their employer. Burnout is a serious workplace issue for all genders, races, ethnicities and job types.

However, the disproportionate increase in burnout among working women during the pandemic has resulted in a third of them dealing with it as a routine part of their job -- a figure that demands attention.

To help inform how this imbalance can be rectified, Gallup researchers studied several factors that could potentially be associated with the expanded gap. A key discovery is that there is no simple answer -- instead, several potential factors emerged requiring further exploration.

The following considerations and insights can help spark important conversations about closing the burnout gender gap.

Remote Work

Women who spend part of their week working remotely (hybrid) are at higher burnout risk (38% in 2021) than women who work exclusively from home (31%) or fully on-site (34%). In contrast, burnout among men tends to be unrelated to their remote work arrangement -- their burnout risk is the same regardless of whether they work fully on-site, work exclusively from home or are hybrid.

Turning to workplace hypotheses, are women being tasked with more of the team coordination and communication activities associated with a hybrid environment where people have highly individualized work schedules? Sixty percent of employees in remote-capable jobs prefer to be hybrid workers long-term. Thus, now is the time to start discussing what that means for women.

Roles and Responsibilities

The burnout gender gap is relatively consistent across most industries and, importantly, is just as evident among white-collar workers as among workers at large.

But within organizations, there is a sizable burnout gender gap among workers who are in individual contributor or project manager roles. Women in these types of positions are significantly more likely than their male counterparts to feel burned out, suggesting they could be dealing with different workload expectations during the pandemic -- either at home, at the office or both.

Conversely, there is little difference by gender in burnout among workers in managerial positions. These findings suggest that workload and support may be more equitable between genders for people in managerial roles than in individual contributor and project manager roles.

Parenthood

The gap in burnout between men and women is just as wide among workers without school-age children (under 18) as among those with school-age children.

When specific aspects of childcare are studied, notable contributions to the gender gap in burnout emerge, but none of these factors prove to be the clear driving force behind the gap. For instance, caring for children and experiencing interruptions to school and daycare are prime ways the pandemic has disrupted people's normal lives, but these factors only modestly affect the burnout gender gap.

This may not be entirely surprising, as schools largely found ways to reopen after the initial surge of the pandemic and people have acclimated to their new work routines. Additionally, previous Gallup research demonstrates that burnout tends to be most strongly influenced by how people experience work and how they are managed.

Nonetheless, family responsibilities and work-life balance are part of every parent's wellbeing equation and should be part of the burnout discussion -- even if they are not the direct causes of the burnout gender gap. As we continue to research the experiences of working mothers, further insights into factors contributing to their burnout will be explored.

Concerns About COVID-19

It's also important to note that the pandemic itself imposes disproportionate stress on women, as women are much more likely than men to say they worry about getting COVID-19. Workers of both genders who are "very" or "somewhat" worried about getting the virus are substantially more likely to be burned out. But because women are more likely to be in this high-worry group, they are also higher on burnout.

The concern here should be how the emotional stress created by the health aspect of the pandemic can stack on top of work-related responsibilities and challenges.

Recommendations for Employers

The heightened rate of burnout for working women necessitates immediate concern and action. Now is the time to address what may be systemically causing workload and stress disparities for women in your organization.

Here's what your organization can do to start the conversation and shrink the burnout gender gap:

  1. Assess, act, repeat. Identify where burnout exists within your workforce. Driving change starts with accurately assessing the problem and using your employees' own personal experiences with burnout to inform and inspire action.

Gallup recommends routinely measuring and tracking workplace teams' wellbeing and engagement using brief employee surveys to unearth hidden challenges -- like the burnout gender gap. These insights can help identify where your greatest burnout risks are occurring. Data alone won't solve the problem, but these facts will help start the right conversations needed to uncover the right answers and create accountability for solving them.

  1. Arm teams to beat burnout. Preventing burnout fundamentally comes down to teaching your managers and teams to have meaningful conversations about what is causing and compounding their stress.

Start by discussing the top five causes of burnout Gallup discovered and what your team can do about them. Pay special attention to the cultural, procedural and systemic factors that may be affecting women differently. Follow up with regular check-ins designed to identify potential burnout risks your team is facing and inform the creation of new norms to better support one another.

Because the No. 1 cause of burnout is feeling treated unfairly at work, alarm bells should be ringing if your conversations or data uncover a gender gap in burnout or in how people believe they are treated at work. And given their elevated burnout rate, be especially vigilant about your burnout surveillance for women working hybrid (partly on-site, partly at home).

  1. Manage your managers. Managers are the most important people in your organization when it comes to building a culture of high engagement and wellbeing -- but new Gallup research has discovered they are now among the most likely to feel burned out.

At the same time, leaders and managers should be mindful that their personal experiences and circumstances with gender equality at work may be very different than those of the team members they lead.

(Gallup)

DECEMBER 27, 2021

Source: https://www.gallup.com/workplace/358349/gender-gap-worker-burnout-widened-amid-pandemic.aspx

 

SUMMARY OF POLLS

ASIA

(Turkey)

9 Out Of 10 People Are Aware Of The Omicron Variant

According to the data of the research conducted in the first week of December; While 71% of the population in our country is aware of the Omicron variant, this rate has reached 85% today. It causes those who are aware of this variant to think more negatively about the duration of the epidemic. 8 out of 10 people think that the duration of the epidemic will be prolonged due to this variant.

(Ipsos Turkey)

27 December 2021

 

AFRICA

(Eswatini)

Most Emaswati (78%) “Agree” Or “Strongly Agree” That Lockdown Restrictions Were Necessary To Limit The Spread Of COVID-19

Most Emaswati (78%) “agree” or “strongly agree” that lockdown restrictions were necessary to limit the spread of COVID-19. About half (49%) say they found it “difficult” or “very difficult” to comply with the lockdown restrictions imposed by the government. Six in 10 Emaswati (60%) support the government’s decision to close schools.

(Afrobarometer)

27 December 2021

 

WEST EUROPE

(UK)

One In Four Britons Have Never Heard Of The Government’s Flagship ‘Levelling Up’ Strategy

‘Levelling up’ – the strategy set out by the Conservative party in their 2019 manifesto – is a plan to target investment in local infrastructure in left-behind communities in the UK.

However, around a quarter of Britons (24%) have never heard of the term, according to a new YouGov survey. Another half (50%) have heard the term but either have no idea what it means or are not completely sure. A quarter (26%) say they know exactly what levelling up means.

(YouGov UK)

December 28, 2021

 

Seven In Ten (70%) Britons Say They Have A Very Strong (39%) Or Fairly Strong (31%) Brexit Identity

New Ipsos MORI polling with the Economist shows seven in ten (70%) Britons say they have a very strong (39%) or fairly strong (31%) Brexit identity. This is in line with the proportion saying the same earlier this year in March (67%), although has softened from four in five (81%) in November 2019. The proportion saying they have a “very strong” Brexit identity has dropped from over half (55%) since 2019. 

(Ipsos MORI)

29 December 2021

 

One In Seven Brits Is Making A New Year's Resolution This Year - Compared To One In Nine Who Did For 2021

This year, some 16% of Britons say they will make a New Year’s resolution – compared to 11% who say they made a resolution this time last year. The young are by far the most likely to be setting themselves a New Year’s resolution, with nearly a third (32%) of those aged between 18 and 24 doing so compared to 10% of those aged 55 and over. Another 41% say they want to commit to improving their diet, and 40% want to lose weight – including 34% of men and 44% of women.

(YouGov UK)

December 29, 2021

 

One In Eight Drinkers Plan To Try And Stay Sober For The First Month Of New Year

YouGov research shows that one in eleven people (9%) say they plan on giving up alcohol at the start of next year, compared to 55% who will continue to drink as normal. However, nearly one in three people (29%) say they don’t drink normally anyway. Taking these people into account means that some 12% of people who say they do drink are planning on giving it up for January, while 79% of drinkers will not. There is little difference among those saying they will take part, including some 11% of male drinkers and 14% women who drink.

(YouGov UK)

December 30, 2021

 

Britain's Best Of 2021

Only a few days remain in 2021 as the year draws to a close. Many Britons will be glad to see the back of this year, and look forward to all that 2022 holds. In a round-up of the year, a YouGov survey askes Britons what their best bits were, from TV and film, world events, and notable people. The best answers in each category were gathered from an initial, open, question in which respondents answered in their own words. A subsequent survey asked Britons to choose between the most popular answers from the first survey.

(YouGov UK)

December 31, 2021

 

NORTH AMERICA

(USA)

Women Are More Likely Than Men To Feel Burned Out At Work, 34% Vs 26%, The Gap Has Only Widened During The Pandemic

Working women report more on-the-job burnout than working men do, and the gap has only widened during the pandemic. In 2019, 30% of women and 27% of men said they "always" or "very often" felt burned out at work. That three-percentage-point gap expanded to 12 points in the pandemic-era months of 2020, from March to December, and has averaged eight points in 2021 -- 34% of women and 26% of men this year have reported feeling burned out.

(Gallup)

DECEMBER 27, 2021

 

Generation Z and millennials less engaged and more stressed at work

According to Gallup's most recent State of the Global Workplace report, the pandemic affected younger workers' careers more negatively in 2020 than older workers'. Younger employees (those under 40) also experienced more stress and anger, lower employee engagement, and lower wellbeing than older workers. These results should be a warning sign for international leaders and global employers who care about the future of their institutions. When paired with pre-COVID data showing that wellbeing has been the No. 1 concern for young job seekers, it is clear that leaders must prioritize employee wellbeing to win in the future.

(Gallup)

DECEMBER 28, 2021

 

Over Half Of Americans Believe The Country's Economy Is Headed In The Wrong Direction

A Reuters/Ipsos poll from earlier this month (Dec 13-17) found that over half of Americans (56%) believe the national economy and the country generally is headed in the wrong direction. This is driven primarily by Republicans (81%), but over half of independents (59% and 63% for each) agree as well. Forty percent of Americans blieve the Democratic party has the better plan for healthcare, compared to only 27% who believe it is Republicans. Over half of Republicans (54%) say they would support Trump as the Republican nominee for President in 2022, Ron DeSantis is a distant second at 11%, 14% say they aren’t sure.

(Ipsos US)

29 December 2021

 

American Have Mixed Expectations On The Start Of New Year

Year two of the pandemic draws to a close. What a rollercoaster it’s been. Yet also like last year, there is still hope on the horizon. Early last year, vaccines appeared to promise the end of COVID once and for all. While that did not play out exactly as hoped, we can take heart in the fact the current spike will cause less severe illness in some cases, in part because so many more people are vaccinated now.

(Ipsos US)
31 December 2021

 

(Canada)

Finances, Forecasts And Fireworks: Four In Ten (41%) Canadians Are Hailing In The New Year With A Resolution About Their Financial Wellbeing

As central banks around the world are adjusting their monetary policy toolkits in the attempt to tamp down decades-high inflationary trends, financial health also dominates Canadians’ forecasts for the coming New Year. A recent Ipsos poll conducted on behalf of Global News reveals that four in ten (41%) Canadians will make a New Year’s resolution about their finances. Nearly half (48%) are resolved to pay off debts in 2022, while the same proportion (48%) considers the price of groceries and food to be the main barrier to their financial security.

(Ipsos Canada)

28 December 2021

 

Canadians Remain Resilient: Despite The Roller Coaster Of 2021, Most Canadians Have A Positive Outlook On Their Personal Happiness, Health Closing Out The Year

A new Ipsos poll conducted on behalf of Global News finds that Canadians retain a remarkable level of positivity about their personal situation in spite of the challenges 2021 has presented, consistent with how they felt closing out 2020. While just under half (46%) of Canadians agree that 2021 was better than they thought it would be, a strong majority rate their personal happiness (77%), health (76%), and social life (69%) positively. Compared to this time last year, Canadians’ ratings of their health are down slightly (-4 pts), but their ratings of their social lives have increased by nine points.

(Ipsos Canada)

30 December 2021

 

MULTICOUNTRY STUDIES

Buzzing Car Brands Among American And British Gamers

The automotive sector and gaming sector have close ties. According to data collected by YouGov Profiles, racing games are the fourth most popular category of games played on consoles or PCs among Brits. In light of the recent launch of Forza Horizon 5 and the upcoming release of Gran Turismo 7 next quarter, we look at the car brands that are resonating among video gamers in Great Britain and the United States this holiday season. We dip into data from YouGov BrandIndex to list out the top brands that are generating Buzz among gamers in each market.

(YouGov UK)

December 31, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/technology/articles-reports/2021/12/31/buzzing-car-brands-among-american-and-british-game

 

Circa 2022 Will Be Better Than 2021, 71% Agree Globally

8 in 10 urban Indians (80%) and 61% of the global citizens polled predict the Economy to emerge stronger in 2022. The markets most optimistic were China (87%), India (80%), and Saudi Arabia (79%). The least optimistic were Turkey (40%), Belgium (44%) and Russia (45%). Further, there is optimism around city centres getting busy again with life limping back ro normalcy around people getting back to offices again – 7 in 10 agree globally (71%), India has 3 in 4 agreeing (74%) and interestingly, all 33 markets have more number of respondents feeling optimistic – markets at the top were China (87%), Malaysia (86%), Netherlands (81%) and Israel (80%).

(Ipsos India)

30 December 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-in/happy-tidings-8-10-urban-indians-believe-circa-2022-will-be-better-2021-ipsos-predictions-2022

 

                                                                       ASIA

723-43-01/Polls

9 Out Of 10 People Are Aware Of The Omicron Variant

About 9 out of 10 People Are Aware of the Omicron Variant

by Ipsos; According to the data of the research conducted in the first week of December; While 71% of the population in our country is aware of the Omicron variant, this rate has reached 85% today. It causes those who are aware of this variant to think more negatively about the duration of the epidemic. 8 out of 10 people think that the duration of the epidemic will be prolonged due to this variant.

Community Concern Level Still Very High.

The level of anxiety of individuals about the coronavirus epidemic has been above 80% for a long time. The rate of those who are worried about themselves or one of their families catching Covid-19 is 85% in the week of 20 December. In addition to this concern, the anxiety level of 4 out of 10 people increased even more due to the new variant and the fact that the number of cases did not decrease.

Even though the vaccine is the most effective solution in the fight against the epidemic, ¼ of the people who need the third dose of vaccine are not clear about getting vaccinated.

Despite the fact that the right of the 3rd dose vaccine has been opened to everyone who has been vaccinated for 2 doses to combat the epidemic, 74% of the people who have not been vaccinated for the 3rd dose so far state that they will get the 3rd dose vaccine, while 1 out of 4 people are unsure about whether they will be vaccinated or not. says it isn't.

1/3 of the Society Says They Will Get the 3rd Dose of Turkovac Vaccine

While 33% of the people who will be vaccinated for the third dose state that they can get the Turkovac vaccine, the rate of those who say they will not get this vaccine is 30%. On the other hand, 16% of people who have never been vaccinated say they can get the Turkovac vaccine.

 

Sidar Gedik, CEO of Ipsos Turkey, made the following evaluations about the data; The Covid-19 epidemic taught us that one of the ways to end epidemics is virus mutation. While the new variants were worrying about the effectiveness of the vaccine, it also brought up the hopeful question "could this be the last variant?" Covid-19 is now here with its latest variant, Omicron. Approximately nine out of ten people are aware of this variant. However, instead of giving us hope for the end of the epidemic, these mutations that we come across one after another have the opposite effect, eight out of ten people think that Omicron will prolong the end of the epidemic. Even the fact that the vaccinated can cope with Omicron more easily does not relieve the anxiety, the level of anxiety is still very high.

The necessity of being vaccinated to contain the epidemic is accepted by the vast majority, but when it comes to the 3rd dose of vaccine, there are people who have a question mark even among those who have been vaccinated with 2 doses. As the struggle drags on, a thaw seems to begin. One out of four people who have been vaccinated for 2 doses has not made a clear decision about whether to get the 3rd dose.

 

Opinions about the Turkovac vaccine, which is on the agenda with the temporary use approval, are not fully settled. Even among those who have been vaccinated for 2 doses (that is, the non-anti-vaccine mass), only a third of them say they will become Turkovac. Among those who have not been vaccinated, the rate of those who say they will be Turkovac drops to 16%. Of course, looking at this backwards, we can say that Turkovac can convince sixteen of every hundred people who have not been vaccinated so far. I hope Omicron is that final variant that will bring an end to the epidemic.

RESEARCH IDENTIFICATION

With the Coronavirus Epidemic and Community General Public Opinion Survey conducted by Ipsos, it was aimed to reveal the awareness levels, concerns and changing behaviors of the citizens on this issue following the detection of the coronavirus case in Turkey for the first time, and to understand the reflection of the government's policies and practices on this issue in the public. The research was carried out with Online Interviews (CAWI) with 800 individuals over the age of 18 at NUTS 1 level, representing Turkey. Data as of 20-24 December 2021; The statistical error margin of the research covering the 88th period data is ± 3% at the 95% confidence interval.

(Ipsos Turkey)

27 December 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/tr-tr/her-10-kisiden-9u-omicron-varyantindan-haberdar

 

AFRICA

723-43-02/Polls

Most Emaswati (78%) “Agree” Or “Strongly Agree” That Lockdown Restrictions Were Necessary To Limit The Spread Of COVID-19

Most Emaswati support the government’s lockdown restrictions to prevent the spread of

COVID-19 even though about half say they found it difficult to comply, the latest

Afrobarometer survey shows.

Similarly, a majority of citizens endorse the government’s decision to close the schools but

think they should have reopened sooner.

To limit the spread of the coronavirus, government has instituted partial lockdown restrictions,

including school closures that kept most students (particulalryl those enrolled in government

schools) away from the classroom for much of 2020 and parts of 2021. While this year saw

learners retun to the classrooms following easing of the ‘hard’ restrictions of the previous

year, outbreaks of subsequent COVID-19 waves and civil unrest yet again led to the shutting

down of schools. The government has continued to gradually ease restrictions, allowing most

business, including some of those most affected by the lockdowns such the alcohol and

entertainment industry, to begin the long journey to economic recovery. Most recently, the

government announced the end of a curfew that has in place for several months now.

Key findings

 Most Emaswati (78%) “agree” or “strongly agree” that lockdown restrictions were

necessary to limit the spread of COVID-19 (Figure 1).

 About half (49%) say they found it “difficult” or “very difficult” to comply with the

lockdown restrictions imposed by the government (Figure 2).

 Six in 10 Emaswati (60%) support the government’s decision to close schools (Figure

3).

 But more than nine in 10 citizens (93%) think the schools should have reopened

sooner, including 78% who say they were closed “much too long” (Figure 4).

(Afrobarometer)

27 December 2021

Source: https://afrobarometer.org/sites/default/files/press-release/eSwatini/news_release-emaswati_support_covid-19_lockdowns-afrobarometer-27dec21.pdf

 

WEST EUROPE

723-43-03/Polls

One In Four Britons Have Never Heard Of The Government’s Flagship ‘Levelling Up’ Strategy

‘Levelling up’ – the strategy set out by the Conservative party in their 2019 manifesto – is a plan to target investment in local infrastructure in left-behind communities in the UK.

However, around a quarter of Britons (24%) have never heard of the term, according to a new YouGov survey. Another half (50%) have heard the term but either have no idea what it means or are not completely sure. A quarter (26%) say they know exactly what levelling up means.

As well as few knowing what levelling up means, three in five (58%) say they’re not following the developments of the levelling up plans, with just 9% saying they’re following the story ‘very closely’.

How do Britons feel about government spending in their local area?

Overall, half of the British public (50%) think that the current amount of money the government spends in their local area is too low, with 17% saying ‘about right’.

In the North East and the North West of England, two-thirds of residents (66% and 65% respectively) think the government is not spending enough money in their local area, the highest proportion of any region in Great Britain. This compares to just over a third (36%) of Londoners who feel the same way.

However, Britons are not confident that the levelling up fund will bring more money to their local area. Only 7% of the public overall think that levelling up will lead to more money being spent in their communities, with most (44%) saying there would be no difference. Around one in six (18%) think they would get less money as a result of the fund. Three in ten (31%) didn’t know whether the fund would lead to more or less spending where they live.

Boris Johnson promised in a speech this July that levelling up would be ‘win-win for the whole United Kingdom’ and that funding would not be taken away from London and the South.

Despite this promise, three in 10 Londoners (28%) think that levelling up will lead to less money spent in their local area, and a quarter (25%) of residents of the South East feel the same way.

While optimism for more local spending is low across all regions of the UK, it is lowest in the South East of England (3% think levelling up will bring in more money where they live), London (5%) and the South West (5%), and highest in the North East and North West of England (12%).

https://d25d2506sfb94s.cloudfront.net/cumulus_uploads/inlineimage/2021-12-15/leveling_up_predictions_izzy.png

What should the levelling up fund target?

The government is using three key indicators to target the funds. These include looking at areas with a need for economic recovery and growth, a need for improved transport connectivity (England only), and areas with a high proportion of empty houses and commercial buildings in need of ‘regeneration’.

The British public think the government should prioritise levelling up funds to deprived areas such as those with high poverty rates (60%) and high unemployment (56%). Around half (49%) think areas with low levels of education should be a priority, and 46% say areas with mostly low wage jobs should be targeted for the funds.

Transport links were lower down the priority list at 43%, and areas with a high number of empty houses even less so, with around a quarter (26%) saying they should be a priority for the money.

(YouGov UK)

December 28, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2021/12/28/one-four-britons-have-never-heard-governments-flag

 

723-43-04/Polls

Seven In Ten (70%) Britons Say They Have A Very Strong (39%) Or Fairly Strong (31%) Brexit Identity

  • Brexit identities have softened from 2019, although still stronger than party identities 
  • Remain voters split on whether to reverse Brexit or make the best of it

New Ipsos MORI polling with the Economist shows seven in ten (70%) Britons say they have a very strong (39%) or fairly strong (31%) Brexit identity. This is in line with the proportion saying the same earlier this year in March (67%), although has softened from four in five (81%) in November 2019. The proportion saying they have a “very strong” Brexit identity has dropped from over half (55%) since 2019. 

Brexit identities have softened since 2019 but have remained constant during 2021

Similar levels of “Remainer” and “Leaver” identifiers say they have a strong Brexit identity, reaching nearly nine in ten among each group (88%, 86% respectively). These figures are relatively unchanged from March 2021, but both sides see a fall in “very strong” identifiers since 2019 (from 61% to 52% among Remainers, 63% to 45% among Leavers). 

Comparatively, Brexit identities remain stronger than party identities. Just over half (52%) say they identify very (17%) or fairly (35%) strongly with a political party, which is relatively unchanged from March 2021 (49%), but down from 62% in November 2019 in the build up to the General Election. Strength of identity is stronger among 2019 Labour than 2019 Conservative  voters (by 68% to 56% respectively).

Brexit identities are still stronger than party identities

Looking forward, a third (34%) of the public say Britain was right to leave the European Union. Three in ten (30%) believe we were wrong to leave, but now that we have done so, we should work to make the best of Britain’s position outside the EU, whilst a quarter (24%) think we were wrong to leave and should concentrate on reversing that decision as soon as possible. 

Over three in four (77%) 2016 Leave voters are confident that Britain was right was to leave the EU. Whereas, while most 2016 Remain voters still think it was the wrong decision, they are split on the best way forward. Two in five (41%) say we were wrong to leave and should reverse the decision as soon as possible, but 47% think we were wrong but should now make the best of it.

There is a clear Brexit identity gradient to this: two in three (65%) of very strong Remainer identifiers say we should focus on reversing Brexit as soon as possible versus three in ten (31%) believing we should make the best of it. In comparison, three in ten (31%) who describe themselves as fairly strong Remainers say we should focus on re-joining as soon as possible, compared to three in five (62%) wanting to make the best of it.

The purpose of this research was to measure the strength of Britons' identities on the Brexit question five years after the referendum.  Comparing this with the strength of party political loyalties, and (particularly for this who felt it was the wrong decision) understanding their priorities between wanting to reverse that decision as soon as possible or make the best of it for now, as well as how that relates to how strongly they still feel about Brexit as an issue. It used a combination of trend questions on the strength of people's identities to measure change (if any), and a new question on people's views now. This question is not designed to measure support for rejoining the EU in any referendum but to understand in more detail the priorities people have now and (in conjunction with the other questions) how it relates to the strength of their self-identification with the sides of the 2016 referendum. 

This question deliberately asked about rejoining as soon as possible to ascertain people’s immediate priorities with regard to the Brexit question approaching two years from our official exit from the EU. As part of our ongoing research into Brexit and it’s impacts on Britain and our society, we will continue to produce research across the topic including updating our previous research on people’s preferred future relationship with the EU.

 

Gideon Skinner, Head of Politics at Ipsos MORI, says of the findings:

Perhaps understandably, Britons do not feel their Brexit identities quite as strongly as they did two years ago, but they are still more powerful than traditional party loyalties.  Meanwhile, although the public have become more negative about Brexit since earlier this year, this does not mean that Remain voters are unanimous in wanting to reverse the decision as soon as possible.  Although this still remains the focus for those who feel their Remain identity most strongly, for other less fervent Remainers they are prepared to make the best of it.

(Ipsos MORI)

29 December 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/ipsos-mori/en-uk/both-remainers-and-leavers-retain-strong-brexit-identity-5-years

 

723-43-05/Polls

One In Seven Brits Is Making A New Year's Resolution This Year - Compared To One In Nine Who Did For 2021

With the last days of 2021 upon us, many Britons will be looking ahead at what they want to achieve in 2022. For some, a New Year’s resolution is a far overused cliché, but for others, it’s a solemn promise to be taken very seriously.

This year, some 16% of Britons say they will make a New Year’s resolution – compared to 11% who say they made a resolution this time last year.

The young are by far the most likely to be setting themselves a New Year’s resolution, with nearly a third (32%) of those aged between 18 and 24 doing so compared to 10% of those aged 55 and over.

What New Year’s Resolutions are people making?

For the third year in a row, health and fitness come top of the list of Britons’ resolutions they plan on making, with the most popular among those making resolutions being to do more exercise or improve their fitness (49%).

Another 41% say they want to commit to improving their diet, and 40% want to lose weight – including 34% of men and 44% of women.

A similar proportion of people (39%) say they want to try and put more money into their savings next year, while around half as many want to pursue a career ambition (19%) – with men (23%) more likely to attempt to than women (16%).

A further 16% say they will try and spend less time on social media, and 15% want to take up a new hobby or cut down on their drinking.

How many people kept their 2021 New Year’s resolutions?

One of the clichés of New Year’s resolutions is that people end up breaking their promises to themselves anyway – but this is true? Looking back on the year, how many people who made a commitment this time in 2020 claim to have stuck by them?

Three in ten (31%) of those who made New Year resolutions for 2021 claim to have kept all their resolutions – with men more likely to say they kept all their resolutions (38%) than women (26%). Another 44% of people say they kept at least some of their resolutions for 2021.

Nearly one in five (19%) own up and say they did not keep any of the resolutions they made for this year, including 22% of women and 15% of men.

Check back next year to see how many Britons followed through with their resolutions for 2022!

(YouGov UK)

December 29, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/lifestyle/articles-reports/2021/12/29/what-new-years-resolutions-are-people-setting-2022

 

723-43-06/Polls

One In Eight Drinkers Plan To Try And Stay Sober For The First Month Of New Year

Cutting down on the booze is a popular New Year’s resolution, but how many people say they are going tee-total for the month?

YouGov research shows that one in eleven people (9%) say they plan on giving up alcohol at the start of next year, compared to 55% who will continue to drink as normal.

However, nearly one in three people (29%) say they don’t drink normally anyway. Taking these people into account means that some 12% of people who say they do drink are planning on giving it up for January, while 79% of drinkers will not. There is little difference among those saying they will take part, including some 11% of male drinkers and 14% women who drink.

Some 13% of those aged 18 to 24 plan to give up alcohol in January, as do 15% of people aged between 35 and 44, and 9 of people aged 55 and over.

Check back through January to see how many people manage to stay sober throughout the entire month.

(YouGov UK)

December 30, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/lifestyle/articles-reports/2021/12/30/how-many-people-will-abstain-alcohol-january

 

723-43-07/Polls

Britain's Best Of 2021

Only a few days remain in 2021 as the year draws to a close. Many Britons will be glad to see the back of this year, and look forward to all that 2022 holds. In a round-up of the year, a YouGov survey askes Britons what their best bits were, from TV and film, world events, and notable people.

The best answers in each category were gathered from an initial, open, question in which respondents answered in their own words. A subsequent survey asked Britons to choose between the most popular answers from the first survey.

Who had the biggest impact on the world this year?

Sir Captain Tom Moore rose to fame in 2020 by walking 100 laps of his garden before his 100th birthday to raise money for the NHS -a feat that raised £38.9 million. Before he sadly passed away in February this year, his efforts won him the admiration of the nation as well as a knighthood. Now, 21% of the public say he had the biggest impact on the world this year.

Some 9% thought former President Donald Trump had the biggest impact on the world for better or worse, followed by 7% who think Greta Thunberg did. Another 6% say Boris Johnson had the most significant impact on the world, and the same proportion think the same of Elon Musk.

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What was the best development this year?

This year saw the pandemic continue as new variants of COVID-19 emerged, but it also saw a huge global effort towards vaccination – which Britons see as by far the best development of the year (43%). Another 13% think the end of the most severe COVID-19 lockdown restrictions across the UK was the best event of the year.

One in nine (11%) think the increased discussion and awareness of climate change was the best thing to happen this year – alongside 2% who think the COP 26 conference in Glasgow was the best event.

Some 7% think the Euro 2020 (postponed into 2021) was the best event of the year, despite the heart-breaking final for the England side. Another 3% of Brits think the Tokyo 2020 Olympics (also postponed to 2021) was the best event of the year.

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What was the worst development this year?

Of course, with good comes the bad - and 2021 was certainly a tough year for a lot of people. Unsurprisingly the continuing COVID-19 pandemic is seen as the worst event of the year (19%). A further 10% think that the new variants of COVID-19 such Omicron are the worst development of the year, and 7% say the lockdown restrictions.

Politics was also seen as being among the worst parts of 2021. Just over one in eight people (13%) think that Boris Johnson’s Conservative government remaining in power was the worst part of the year - another 9% say immigration, and 8% say Brexit.

A tenth of the general public (10%) think the withdrawal of Allied forces from Afghanistan, which saw the country quickly fall under Taliban rule once again, was the worst thing to happen.

One in twelve (8%) say continuing climate change was the worst development in 2021.

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What was the best film of 2021?

Following several postponements throughout 2020, No Time to Die finally hit cinemas this year, and despite premiering late in the year has gone on to be the third highest grossing film of the year. For Britons however, it is their best film of the year with 14% of the vote.

Other notable films included Dune (5%) and Black Widow (3%) – however given that much of 2021 in the UK was spent in lockdown, many Britons were not sure.

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What was the best television programme of 2021?

While Britons might have been kept from the cinema by lockdown, they were spoilt for choice at home, with finales and new seasons alike. This included the much-anticipated Line of Duty finale and the reveal of the criminal mastermind “H” – which netted the show the top spot as the best programme of the year with 20% of the vote.

Another 14% of people picked South-Korean Netflix hit Squid Game as their best show, and 8% think It’s a Sin was the best show of 2021.

Strictly Come Dancing racked up 7% of the vote, and 6% of people think Gogglebox was the best.

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Who was the best music act of 2021?

For another year in row, Ed Sheeran tops the YouGov charts, with 13% of the public picking him as the best musical act of 2021.

Adele, whose latest Album 30 has been at number one in the official album chart for four weeks, comes second with one in ten people (10%) thinking she was the best act of 2021.

ABBA, who also released a new album this year, garnered some 8% of the vote.

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Best soap opera of the year

For the third time in a row, Britons say Coronation Street is their favourite soap opera of the year, with Emmerdale second at 7% and Eastenders third at 6%. But it seems as if many Brits didn’t spend their time watching soap operas this year – most of the public (68%) weren’t sure.

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Best reality television show of the year

Baking is back in favour with the British public – after not appearing in the top 10 on 2019’s rankings, the Great British Bake Off has shot to the top this year alongside Gogglebox to tie for best reality show of the year, with 15% each. Strictly Come Dancing – making history this year with its first all-male dancing couple in John and Johannes – ranks in third at 12%.

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Best actor of the year

When it comes to the best actor of 2021, there is a three-way tie. Daniel Craig, star of the British public’s favourite film of 2021 No Time to Die, 2021 Emmy Award winner David Tennant and Free Guy lead Ryan Reynolds winning 9% of the vote each. Tom Hardy, first place in 2019, drops to fourth place with 7%.

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Best actress of the year

‘The Crown’ star Olivia Colman is Britain’s favourite actress for the third time in a row, with 12% of the vote. Killing Eve actress Jodie Comer, who recently starred in Free Guy alongside other favourite actor Ryan Reynolds, is a close second with 11%, and Judi Dench third at 9%.

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Best television personality of 2021

For the third time running, Sir David Attenborough is the British public’s favourite television personality of the year with 20% of the vote. The Chase presenter Bradley Walsh and famous farmer Jeremy Clarkson tie for second place with 11%.

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(YouGov UK)

December 31, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/entertainment/articles-reports/2021/12/31/yougovs-best-2021

 

NORTH AMERICA

723-43-08/Polls

Women Are More Likely Than Men To Feel Burned Out At Work, 34% Vs 26%, The Gap Has Only Widened During The Pandemic

Working women report more on-the-job burnout than working men do, and the gap has only widened during the pandemic.

In 2019, 30% of women and 27% of men said they "always" or "very often" felt burned out at work. That three-percentage-point gap expanded to 12 points in the pandemic-era months of 2020, from March to December, and has averaged eight points in 2021 -- 34% of women and 26% of men this year have reported feeling burned out.

https://content.gallup.com/origin/gallupinc/GallupSpaces/Production/Cms/WORKPLACEV9CMS/5smsh_6mfkmlooopsw_xxg.png

Line graph. Trend in percentage of U.S. employees who always or very often feel burned out at work, by gender. Burnout among women was 30% in 2019 but expanded to 34% in 2020 and remains 34% in 2021. Burnout among men was 27% in 2019, fell to 22% in 2020 and is 26% in 2021.

The expanded gender gap in worker burnout seen during the pandemic is the result of two shifts since 2019 -- increased burnout among women and decreased burnout among men. Burnout among men has varied, dipping significantly to 22% in 2020 and then rising to 26% this year, but is still just below the 27% recorded in 2019. By contrast, women's burnout increased four points to 34% in 2020 and remains at that level in 2021.

Why Does the Burnout Gender Gap Matter, and What Is Contributing to It?

To be clear, burnout among working men is still far too common, with about one in four currently experiencing it on a regular basis. Employees who reach this breaking point of always or very often feeling burned out at work are 23% more likely to visit the emergency room, 63% more likely to take a sick day and 2.6 times as likely to leave their employer. Burnout is a serious workplace issue for all genders, races, ethnicities and job types.

However, the disproportionate increase in burnout among working women during the pandemic has resulted in a third of them dealing with it as a routine part of their job -- a figure that demands attention.

To help inform how this imbalance can be rectified, Gallup researchers studied several factors that could potentially be associated with the expanded gap. A key discovery is that there is no simple answer -- instead, several potential factors emerged requiring further exploration.

The following considerations and insights can help spark important conversations about closing the burnout gender gap.

Remote Work

Women who spend part of their week working remotely (hybrid) are at higher burnout risk (38% in 2021) than women who work exclusively from home (31%) or fully on-site (34%). In contrast, burnout among men tends to be unrelated to their remote work arrangement -- their burnout risk is the same regardless of whether they work fully on-site, work exclusively from home or are hybrid.

Turning to workplace hypotheses, are women being tasked with more of the team coordination and communication activities associated with a hybrid environment where people have highly individualized work schedules? Sixty percent of employees in remote-capable jobs prefer to be hybrid workers long-term. Thus, now is the time to start discussing what that means for women.

Roles and Responsibilities

The burnout gender gap is relatively consistent across most industries and, importantly, is just as evident among white-collar workers as among workers at large.

But within organizations, there is a sizable burnout gender gap among workers who are in individual contributor or project manager roles. Women in these types of positions are significantly more likely than their male counterparts to feel burned out, suggesting they could be dealing with different workload expectations during the pandemic -- either at home, at the office or both.

Conversely, there is little difference by gender in burnout among workers in managerial positions. These findings suggest that workload and support may be more equitable between genders for people in managerial roles than in individual contributor and project manager roles.

Parenthood

The gap in burnout between men and women is just as wide among workers without school-age children (under 18) as among those with school-age children.

When specific aspects of childcare are studied, notable contributions to the gender gap in burnout emerge, but none of these factors prove to be the clear driving force behind the gap. For instance, caring for children and experiencing interruptions to school and daycare are prime ways the pandemic has disrupted people's normal lives, but these factors only modestly affect the burnout gender gap.

This may not be entirely surprising, as schools largely found ways to reopen after the initial surge of the pandemic and people have acclimated to their new work routines. Additionally, previous Gallup research demonstrates that burnout tends to be most strongly influenced by how people experience work and how they are managed.

Nonetheless, family responsibilities and work-life balance are part of every parent's wellbeing equation and should be part of the burnout discussion -- even if they are not the direct causes of the burnout gender gap. As we continue to research the experiences of working mothers, further insights into factors contributing to their burnout will be explored.

Concerns About COVID-19

It's also important to note that the pandemic itself imposes disproportionate stress on women, as women are much more likely than men to say they worry about getting COVID-19. Workers of both genders who are "very" or "somewhat" worried about getting the virus are substantially more likely to be burned out. But because women are more likely to be in this high-worry group, they are also higher on burnout.

The concern here should be how the emotional stress created by the health aspect of the pandemic can stack on top of work-related responsibilities and challenges.

Recommendations for Employers

The heightened rate of burnout for working women necessitates immediate concern and action. Now is the time to address what may be systemically causing workload and stress disparities for women in your organization.

Here's what your organization can do to start the conversation and shrink the burnout gender gap:

  1. Assess, act, repeat. Identify where burnout exists within your workforce. Driving change starts with accurately assessing the problem and using your employees' own personal experiences with burnout to inform and inspire action.

Gallup recommends routinely measuring and tracking workplace teams' wellbeing and engagement using brief employee surveys to unearth hidden challenges -- like the burnout gender gap. These insights can help identify where your greatest burnout risks are occurring. Data alone won't solve the problem, but these facts will help start the right conversations needed to uncover the right answers and create accountability for solving them.

  1. Arm teams to beat burnout. Preventing burnout fundamentally comes down to teaching your managers and teams to have meaningful conversations about what is causing and compounding their stress.

Start by discussing the top five causes of burnout Gallup discovered and what your team can do about them. Pay special attention to the cultural, procedural and systemic factors that may be affecting women differently. Follow up with regular check-ins designed to identify potential burnout risks your team is facing and inform the creation of new norms to better support one another.

Because the No. 1 cause of burnout is feeling treated unfairly at work, alarm bells should be ringing if your conversations or data uncover a gender gap in burnout or in how people believe they are treated at work. And given their elevated burnout rate, be especially vigilant about your burnout surveillance for women working hybrid (partly on-site, partly at home).

  1. Manage your managers. Managers are the most important people in your organization when it comes to building a culture of high engagement and wellbeing -- but new Gallup research has discovered they are now among the most likely to feel burned out.

At the same time, leaders and managers should be mindful that their personal experiences and circumstances with gender equality at work may be very different than those of the team members they lead.

(Gallup)

DECEMBER 27, 2021

Source: https://www.gallup.com/workplace/358349/gender-gap-worker-burnout-widened-amid-pandemic.aspx

 

723-43-09/Polls

Generation Z and millennials less engaged and more stressed at work

According to Gallup's most recent State of the Global Workplace report, the pandemic affected younger workers' careers more negatively in 2020 than older workers'. Younger employees (those under 40) also experienced more stress and anger, lower employee engagement, and lower wellbeing than older workers.

The Gallup World Poll surveys adults aged 15 and older, which means these findings include millennials (born 1980 to 1996) and working-age Generation Z employees (born after 1996).

These results should be a warning sign for international leaders and global employers who care about the future of their institutions. When paired with pre-COVID data showing that wellbeing has been the No. 1 concern for young job seekers, it is clear that leaders must prioritize employee wellbeing to win in the future.

Let's take a look at the key generational findings from the report:

The first year of the pandemic hit younger workers harder than older workers.

In 2020, Gallup asked several questions related to COVID-19. Across the board, workers under 40 reported greater pandemic effects.

https://content.gallup.com/origin/gallupinc/GallupSpaces/Production/Cms/WORKPLACEV9CMS/4dp8hjedgeg-hwvky15fdw.png

Bar chart. COVID-19 has affected people's lives differently based on their age group. Those under age 40 are more likely to say their life has been affected a lot by the pandemic, and are more likely to say they lost pay, worked fewer hours, and lost a job or business.

(The margin of sampling error for the global report data referenced in this article is less than one percentage point at the 95% confidence level.)

Most notably, younger workers were more likely than older workers to say they temporarily stopped working (by 10 percentage points) or lost a job or business (by nine points). This may be a result of younger workers in entry-level or part-time work. However, many millennials entered the workforce during the Great Recession -- a disadvantage that likely compounded the economic and emotional strain of the pandemic. It may take many years before we can fully appreciate how much the pandemic harmed younger workers during their prime career-building, wealth-building years.

Negative emotions increased across the workforce in 2020, with anger and stress higher for workers under 40.

Daily worry, stress, anger and sadness reached record levels among the world's employees in 2020. The pandemic has been not only a physical health crisis but a mental health crisis as well. And for younger workers, it's even more acute. Younger workers experienced more stress (44%) than did older workers (42%) in the first year of the pandemic.

Perhaps even more troubling, more employees under 40 experienced anger a lot of the previous day (26%) than did older employees (22%).

It's worth noting that negative emotions have been rising for several years for all workers prior to the pandemic. In addition, younger workers in the past have been more likely to experience anger and stress, but in 2020, they were experiencing this at a slightly higher rate. This suggests the pandemic does not entirely explain higher stress and anger among younger workers, because it has persisted across time. The pandemic may have had some impact, as Gallup has also found that younger workers were more likely to report significant impacts from the COVID-19 pandemic -- such as receiving less money than usual from their work, working fewer hours, having temporarily stopped working at their job or business, or losing their job or business.

Gallup also asked three items related to ESG (environmental, social and governance) factors. Younger employees were more likely to report corruption in business and to be less satisfied with efforts to preserve the environment in their country. Seventy-two percent of workers under 40 said corruption in business is widespread within their country, compared with 67% of those aged 40 and older.

Employees under 40 have lower workplace engagement and lower overall wellbeing than older employees do.

Given the generational divide on COVID-19 life impact and negative daily emotions, it's perhaps not surprising that those under 40 have slightly lower employee engagement than older employees do (18% vs. 21% engaged, respectively) and lower "thriving" wellbeing (31% vs. 33%).

 

When employees are disengaged at work, they are unlikely to impress customers, be creative or go the extra mile. And when employees are suffering in their overall wellbeing -- for example, experiencing loneliness, financial insecurity or health problems -- they are not able to bring their best selves to work. At worst, suffering employees burn out, quit and share their bad experiences with others.

The hard truth? If you lead a typical organization, most of your employees are not engaged at work and about two-thirds are not thriving.

Millennials and Gen Z want employers who care about their wellbeing.

Before the pandemic, Gallup asked workers what they look for most in an employer. The No. 1 response for Gen Z and millennials was this: The organization cares about employees' wellbeing.

The pandemic only raised the stakes with employee wellbeing -- in terms of everything from physical safety for front-line workers to greater flexibility and support for remote workers juggling upset family routines. Wellbeing is no longer merely a perk, a benefit or a program to keep healthcare costs low. Caring for employees is a basic expectation for employees to show up to work.

The hard truth? If you lead a typical organization, most of your employees are not engaged at work and about two-thirds are not thriving.

Leaders, particularly those who come from older generations, also need to recognize that wellbeing support looks different for different stages of life. Younger workers may have unique challenges that simply are not the common experience of older veteran employees.

In addition, recognize that typical or traditional career paths have changed. Many millennials have experienced both the Great Recession and now a global pandemic. Employers should revisit what job requirements or expectations are truly necessary for success.

For leaders, the first step to showing you care about your millennial and Gen Z employees is to start a dialogue about expectations and needs. Expand the conversation beyond physical health to include dimensions like financial and social wellbeing, which influence health too. And make career development more personalized to fit the complexity of modern life.

Millennial and Gen Z burnout is not inevitable. But the solution begins with employers who listen, care and take action.

(Gallup)

DECEMBER 28, 2021

Source: https://www.gallup.com/workplace/358385/younger-workers-worse.aspx

 

723-43-10/Polls

Over Half Of Americans Believe The Country's Economy Is Headed In The Wrong Direction

Washington, DC, December 29, 2021 – A Reuters/Ipsos poll from earlier this month (Dec 13-17) found that over half of Americans (56%) believe the national economy and the country generally is headed in the wrong direction. This is driven primarily by Republicans (81%), but over half of independents (59% and 63% for each) agree as well. Forty percent of Americans blieve the Democratic party has the better plan for healthcare, compared to only 27% who believe it is Republicans. Over half of Republicans (54%) say they would support Trump as the Republican nominee for President in 2022, Ron DeSantis is a distant second at 11%, 14% say they aren’t sure. Nearly three-quarters (73%) of Americans say they are concerned about COVID-19, this includes 88% of Democrats, 58% of Republicans, and 71% of independents. The same proportion (73%) agree that inflation is a very big concern for her and 69% say the wealthiest Americans should pay higher taxes.

Forty percent of Americans believe the U.S. Congress is mostly dysfunctional, but occasionally can get things done. A third of Americans (32%) know that if the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade it would results in laws governing abortion to be made at the state level, allowing it to remain legal in some states and become illegal in others. 16% believe abortion would become illegal in the U.S. immediately. Overall though, Americans are split over their opinions on abortion. One-quarter of Americans (25%) believe it should be illegal in most cases, while 26% believe it should be legal in most cases, and 23% believe it should be legal in all cases. 14% are unsure, and 12% (mostly Republicans (19%)) believe it should be illegal in all cases. They are also split on who should decide whether abortion is legal or not: 38% say the federal government, 34% say each state government, and 28% are unsure. Less than half (48%) approve of President Biden’s performance in office.  

(Ipsos US)

29 December 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-us/news-polls/over-half-americans-believe-countrys-economy-headed-wrong-direction-122921

 

723-43-11/Polls

American Have Mixed Expectations On The Start Of New Year

Year two of the pandemic draws to a close. What a rollercoaster it’s been.

In some ways, it feels like we’re right back where we were twelve months ago. At the start of the year, cases were rising to new heights. And today, once again, COVID levels are already breaking new records as we buckle down for another tough winter.

Yet also like last year, there is still hope on the horizon. Early last year, vaccines appeared to promise the end of COVID once and for all. While that did not play out exactly as hoped, we can take heart in the fact the current spike will cause less severe illness in some cases, in part because so many more people are vaccinated now.

Either way, COVID still overshadows many aspects of everyday life. As we count down the final hours of 2021, we take a look at the ups and downs people felt.

Back to normal. How to define “normal” after a global pandemic? Last spring, many began to hope that a post-COVID normal was close at hand. Things have changed since, and opinion has shifted along with levels of concern about COVID. For the concerned, normal is still elusive. For more than half of the unconcerned, it’s already here. Back to normal

 

Rise and fall. There were points last year where COVID genuinely did appear to be on the wane. Levels of concern about COVID tracked with it – down in the spring and early summer, up again with Delta and Omicron. COVID concern

 

Reengaging with the world. People began socializing again once a majority of the adult population was vaccinated – whether or not they had received the shot. Although concern about the virus is still very much a part of daily life, few have been willing to relinquish those social bonds, once reestablished. Socializing

 

  1. Economic outlook stalls. Consumer sentiment grew stronger in the first part of 2021, only to backtrack amid rising inflation and economic uncertainty brought about by Delta and Omicron variants. Our jobs indicator was the only one to sustain a measurable improvement, per our Ipsos Forbes Advisor consumer confidence tracker over the course of 2021. Despite broader economic worries, the job market is generally strong at the moment. Jobs and Overall

 

  1. Tilting negative. Americans started out the year split on the overall direction of the country. As 2021 draws to a close, we’ve come more firmly down on the side of things spinning off track. Can 2022 restore some optimism?

 

 Wrong track

 

So, where does the close of 2021 leave us? Our Axios-Ipsos tracking data stops off in mid-December, so we wait to early 2022 for a full accounting of how Omicron has impacted people’s behavior and sentiment. But our available data indicates that the public is increasingly exasperated, and once again more concerned about the trajectory of the pandemic.

(Ipsos US)
31 December 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-us/news-polls/mixed-expectations

 

723-43-12/Polls

Finances, Forecasts And Fireworks: Four In Ten (41%) Canadians Are Hailing In The New Year With A Resolution About Their Financial Wellbeing

As central banks around the world are adjusting their monetary policy toolkits in the attempt to tamp down decades-high inflationary trends, financial health also dominates Canadians’ forecasts for the coming New Year. A recent Ipsos poll conducted on behalf of Global News reveals that four in ten (41%) Canadians will make a New Year’s resolution about their finances. Nearly half (48%) are resolved to pay off debts in 2022, while the same proportion (48%) considers the price of groceries and food to be the main barrier to their financial security.

Finances and Health as Priorities for the New Year

While Canadians’ traditional end-of-year contemplations are tinted with signs reflecting harder times, most remain cautiously optimistic in their predictions for the coming year:

  • On one hand, over half (54%) of Canadians disagree (19% ‘strongly’/ 35% ‘somewhat’) that 2021 was better than they thought it would be, given that over the past year, nearly half (48%) have cut on spending and a similar proportion (46%) have signaled having to deal with issues surrounding mental health, addiction and alcohol consumption.
  • On the other hand, Canadians are demonstrating their resilience by having a cautiously positive outlook for the coming year: two thirds (67%) indicate they are generally optimistic for 2022 (51% ‘somewhat’/ 15% ‘very’).

Canadians’ optimism for the New Year appears to be mainly channeled towards two main priorities: financial wellbeing and physical health. Almost half (48%) think they will make a New Year’s resolution about their physical health – a commitment which appears more attractive to younger age groups (18-34: 59% and 35-54: 50% vs. 39% for 55+). Moreover, four in ten (41%) Canadians believe they will make a New Year’s resolution about their finances, which is significantly higher among households that have children (52%) compared to those who don’t (37%). Elsewhere, under four in ten (37%) are resolved to improve their mental health - a belief more widely held among women (43%) (vs. 30% for men). Likewise, over a third (35%) of Canadians think their New Year’s resolution will center around their family life, which skews significantly towards households that have kids (48% vs. 31% for those who don’t). A similar proportion think they will dedicate the coming year to learning a new skill or hobby (33%) or advancing their work/career/education (32%).

Interestingly, younger generations and Quebecers stand out as the most eager to hail in the New Year with fresh resolutions:

Canadians’ New Year’s resolutions by age group

 

18-34

35-54

55+

Finances

57%

46%

24%

Physical health

59%

50%

39%

Mental health

55%

36%

23%

Family life

47%

35%

26%

Work/Career/Education

56%

34%

11%

Learning a skill/hobby

48%

36%

17%

 

  • The fondness for New Year’s resolutions declines with age across the board. Those aged 18-34 are the most eager to commit to improving these aspects of their lives compared to those aged between 35-54 (by an average of 14 points), as well as those aged 55 and over (by an average for 32 points).
  • In a lesser respect, residents of Quebec also appear to have higher expectations for 2022 compared to other provinces. While this holds across all categories, the difference is most prominent when it comes to finances and mental health. Over half (51%) of Quebecers think they will commit to improving their finances which represents at least a 10-point gap or more compared to all other regions. Furthermore, under half (47%) of Quebecers are resolved to improve their mental health next year compared to 31% for both British Columbia and Alberta, 34% for Saskatchewan/Manitoba and 35% for both Ontario and Atlantic Canada.

Financial projects and barriers

When further prodding those who believe their New Year’s resolution will center around their finances, nearly half (48%) are considering paying off their debts. A similar proportion (45%) are committed to making a budget and sticking to it, which tends to skew towards households with children (54% vs. 41% for those who don’t). Elsewhere, over a third (36%) of Canadians want to save for a rainy day, while a similar proportion are projecting to save for their retirement or invest more in the coming year (34% for both). Almost a quarter (23%) are committed to learning more about finances in 2022, which is more widely held among those aged between 18-34 (33%) (compared to 20% among those between 35-54 and 8% among those 55+).

While only 1% specifically outline inflation and the cost of living as the main barriers to ensure their financial security, Canadians most frequently indicate the affordability of groceries and housing as the main pressure points for themselves and their families. Almost half of Canadians (48%) are worried about the cost of groceries and food; an anxiety which is most prevalent for households earning under $40K a year (62% vs. 52%: $40K - <$60K; 43%: $60K - <$100K; 33%: $100K+). Housing costs remain the second most-cited barrier to financial security - preoccupying one third (31%) of Canadians. This is higher among those aged between 18-34 and 35-54 (respectively 33% and 36% vs. 24% among those 55+); as well as residents of British Columbia (38%) and Ontario (39%) (vs. 28% AB, 24% SK/MB, 20% QC, 18% Atlantic provinces).

A fifth believe that debt (20%), transportation (20%) and their ability to save (21%) represent the most significant challenges to their financial wellbeing, while more than one in ten believe low wages (15%) and healthcare costs (11%) to be the main negative factors. Meanwhile, 14% believe themselves to be already financially secure.

(Ipsos Canada)

28 December 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-ca/news-polls/canadians-new-year-resolutions-finances

 

723-43-13/Polls

Canadians Remain Resilient: Despite The Roller Coaster Of 2021, Most Canadians Have A Positive Outlook On Their Personal Happiness, Health Closing Out The Year

The end of the year is typically a time of reflection and taking stock of the last 12 months. In a time of unprecedented uncertainty, a new Ipsos poll conducted on behalf of Global News finds that Canadians retain a remarkable level of positivity about their personal situation in spite of the challenges 2021 has presented, consistent with how they felt closing out 2020.

While just under half (46%) of Canadians agree that 2021 was better than they thought it would be, a strong majority rate their personal happiness (77%), health (76%), and social life (69%) positively. Compared to this time last year, Canadians’ ratings of their health are down slightly (-4 pts), but their ratings of their social lives have increased by nine points. Two-thirds rate their financial situation positively (66%), unchanged from December 2020. Conversely, 34% remain in a bad financial situation.

Consistent with research throughout the pandemic, those in Quebec have a higher level of optimism compared to other regions in the country. Quebecers are more likely to rate the personal happiness, health, social life, and sex or romantic life positively compared to the other regions. For instance, 68% of Quebecers rate their sex or romantic life as positive compared to the other provinces (compared to 61% SK/MB, 57% BC, 57% ATL, 56% ON, 43% AB), and 83% positively assess their personal happiness (compared to 78% BC, 77% SK/MB, 74% ON, 71% AB, 70% ATL).

Older Canadians are less positive about their sex or romantic life compared younger Canadians (50% 55+ vs 62% 35-54, 62% 18-34), though they are more positive about their personal happiness than younger Canadians, especially those ages 18-34 (82% 55+ vs 76% 35-54, 69% 18-34).

Thinking about these various aspects of your life, would you rate them to be good or bad?

% Rating Very/Somewhat Good

 

Area

Dec. 2020

Dec. 2021

% change

Personal happiness

78%

77%

-1

Health

80%

76%

-4

Social life

60%

69%

+9

Financial situation

66%

66%

0

Sex or romantic life

58%

58%

0

 

Canadians’ Sense of Financial Security Down as Costs of Living Rise

Compared to December 2020, fewer Canadians say they have financial security (14%, -9 pts). With the dramatic inflation of basic necessities in Canada over the past few months, it is perhaps unsurprising that half of Canadians (48%) find the greatest barrier to financial security to be grocery and food costs. Housing costs (31%) are the second highest cited barrier for financial security.

Older Canadians are more likely to cite groceries/food costs (59% 55+ vs 47% 35-54 vs 34% 18-34). On the other hand, younger adults ages 18-34 (33%) and 35-54 (36%) are more likely to cite housing costs (mortgage, rent) as a barrier than those aged 55+ (24%). Those in British Columbia and Ontario are more likely to cite housing costs as the greatest barrier to financial security (39% ON, 38% BC vs 28% AB, 24% SK/MB, 20% QC, 18% ATL).

Moreover, while Canadians’ appraisals of their own financial situation (for better or worse) has not changed since December 2020, the portion of Canadians citing barriers to financial security has risen dramatically in the last year, with grocery costs (+36 pts), housing costs (+19 pts), transportation (+18 pts), debt (+11), the ability to save (+10 pts) all rising in the double digits. Close behind are increases in the portion citing taxes (17%, +9 pts) and, notably, low wages (15%, + 8 pts), a reflection of major shifts in Canadians’ relationship with work since the pandemic began.

Thinking about your current situation, what is the greatest barrier to financial security for you and your family?

 

Barrier to Financial Security

Dec. 2020

Dec. 2021

% change

Groceries/food costs

12%

48%

+36

Housing costs

12%

31%

+19

Ability to save

11%

21%

+10

Transportation

2%

20%

+18

Debt

9%

20%

+11

Taxes

8%

17%

+9

Low wages

8%

15%

+7

No barriers/already have financial security

23%

14%

-9

Healthcare costs

2%

11%

+9

Rising interest rates

n/a

10%

n/a

Inability to find work

6%

8%

+2

Childcare costs

n/a

4%

n/a

Looking after elderly parents/loved ones

3%

4%

+1

Paying for my kids’ education

1%

3%

+2

Inflation/cost of living/utilities

n/a

1%

n/a

 

Half of Canadians Cut Spending This Year

In alignment with rising cost of living, half (48%) of Canadians say they have cut their spending in the past 12 months, a decrease of three points since this time last year. Those 55+ are more likely to say they cut their spending than those aged 18-34 (54% 55+, 46% 35-54, 43% 18-34).

In terms of other changes during 2021, there has been an increase in those who say they started a new job or pursued additional training (17%, +3 pts). Just under one-third (27%) say they struggled with mental health during the past 12 months, on par with this time last year (-1 pt). Women are more likely to report having struggled than men (34% vs 19%), as are younger Canadians (40% 18-34 vs 27% 35-54, 17% 55+). Similar portions of Canadians say they are either in better shape than they were a year ago (33%, no change since 2020) or they have gained weight (29%, -1 pt).

Thinking about the past 12 months, which of the following apply to you personally?

Past 12 Months

Dec. 2020

Dec. 2021

% change

Cut spending

51%

48%

-3

Better shape

33%

33%

0

Gained weight

30%

29%

-1

Struggled with my mental health

28%

27%

-1

Training/new job

14%

17%

+3

WFH for an extended period

18%

15%

-3

Consumed more alcohol

15%

14%

-1

Consumed less alcohol

n/a

14%

n/a

Started or ended a romantic relationship

8%

9%

+1

Started WFH

n/a

9%

n/a

Returned to the office

n/a

7%

n/a

Lost job

9%

6%

-3

Struggled with addiction

7%

6%

-1

None of the above

16%

14%

-2

(Ipsos Canada)

30 December 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-ca/news-polls/Canadians-remain-resilient-most-have-positive-outlook-closing-out-year

 

MULTICOUNTRY STUDIES

723-43-14/Polls

Buzzing Car Brands Among American And British Gamers

The automotive sector and gaming sector have close ties. According to data collected by YouGov Profiles, racing games are the fourth most popular category of games played on consoles or PCs among Brits.

In light of the recent launch of Forza Horizon 5 and the upcoming release of Gran Turismo 7 next quarter, we look at the car brands that are resonating among video gamers in Great Britain and the United States this holiday season. We dip into data from YouGov BrandIndex to list out the top brands that are generating Buzz among gamers in each market.

A car brand’s Buzz score is a net measure based on responses to two questions: “Over the past two weeks, which of the following car makers have you heard something positive about?” and “Now which of the following car makers have you heard something negative about?”. By calculating the difference between these two scores, we create our Buzz metric.

Gamers in this piece are defined as those who play video games for at least an hour per week.

Ford tops the Buzz score ranking among video gamers in the US, with a score of 17.9. The car maker recently launched two popular models – Mustang Mach E and 1965 Mustang Shelby GT350R – on Rocket League.

Jeep (14.6) lands the second spot, with Chevrolet (13.5) coming in third. Toyota, which has the highest Buzz score among the general American population over the last 30 days at 19.4, scores 12.9 among gamers during the same period. The next two spots on the list are also occupied by Japanese brands – Honda (11.8) and Subaru (10.6). Honda recently launched the Honda EvoTrack mobile game, which allows players to take even some soon-to-be-released models for a spin.

General Motors takes the seventh spot with a score of 10.5, followed by Nissan (8.6), Lexus (7.7) and Volvo (6.3).

Video gamers in Britain are generally far less likely to have heard positive things about car brands, the Buzz metric reveals. Mercedes-Benz, which tops the list among British gamers, scores just 4.6. The Germany-headquartered carmaker is a partner of the game publisher, Riot Games and recently unveiled a commemorative championship ring for the 2021 League of Legends World Championship.

Škoda (4), Ford (4), Kia (3.2) and Lexus (3.2) are the other brands that make up the top five table among British gamers. During the same period, Škoda scored only 2 points with the general population. The uptick among gamers might have to do with the brand’s e-sport activations, such as the Škoda Motorsport eChallenge.

Toyota (3.1) claims the sixth spot, followed by Range Rover (3.0) and Honda (2.7). The German duo of Porsche (2.6) and Volkswagen (2.4) round out the top ten list of car makers among British gamers.

(YouGov UK)

December 31, 2021

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/technology/articles-reports/2021/12/31/buzzing-car-brands-among-american-and-british-game

 

723-43-15/Polls

Circa 2022 Will Be Better Than 2021, 71% Agree Globally

8 in 10 urban Indians (80%) and 61% of the global citizens polled predict the Economy to emerge stronger in 2022. The markets most optimistic were China (87%), India (80%), and Saudi Arabia (79%). The least optimistic were Turkey (40%), Belgium (44%) and Russia (45%).

Further, there is optimism around city centers getting busy again with life limping back ro normalcy around people getting back to offices again – 7 in 10 agree globally (71%), India has 3 in 4 agreeing (74%) and interestingly, all 33 markets have more number of respondents feeling optimistic – markets at the top were China (87%), Malaysia (86%), Netherlands (81%) and Israel (80%).

While most global citizens disagree, at least 6 in 10 Urban Indians (60%) expect people to get more tolerant towards each other in 2022. Markets that expect this more likely to happen, were China (83%), Malaysia (66%),   

Vaxx Jabs – More than 80% of the global population will receive at least one dose of COVID19 vaccine has about polarisation of views among global citizens (56% agree) and the markets that agreed most included Peru (81%), China (80%), Malaysia (79%), Brazil (76%), India (75%) and Mexico (75%). Markets agreeing least were Hungary (29%), Poland (33%) and Germany (33%).   

 

Commenting on the findings of the survey, Amit Adarkar, CEO, Ipsos India said, "Most respondents are optimistic of the bright prospects for 2022 and expect the economy to grow, vaccination drive to accelerate and cover majority of population and further they expect tolerance levels to improve. Full recovery is still a long way off and Omicron surge could spoil the party if stern measures of isolation, vaccination and other protocols are not taken to stop the spread."          

 

Key trends emerging in 2022

 

People could fly less than they did in 2019: 45% global citizens polled hold this view; India showed polarized views with 1 in 2 (52%) agreeing; Markets agreeing most were China (68%), Singapore (67%) and Malaysia (66%). And markets agreeing least were Belgium (27%), Saudi Arabia (29%), Colombia (34%), South Korea (35%) and Netherlands (35%).

Prices will outpace people’s incomes is the perception of most global citizens (75%). Markets agreeing most were Russia (88%), Chile (85%), Netherlands (85%), Romania (85%) and Colombia (84%). India had at least 2 in 3 agreeing (68%). Market agreeing least was Japan (33%).     

A lot more people will live their lives in virtual worlds was the view of at least 57% of global citizens polled and 6 in 10 Urban Indians (60%); markets agreeing most were Turkey (77%), Malaysia (75%), Brazil (74%), Poland (72%) and Singapore (72%). Markets agreeing the least were Japan (18%), China (33%) and Saudi Arabia (36%).

Strict rules for large Technology companies could be introduced by the govt, expect China (74%), India (64%), Malaysia (59%) and Singapore (57%) most.

More extreme weather events could take place in 2022 feel 6 in 10 global citizens; India had 62% predicting. Markets most wary of adverse weather events taking place were Netherlands (72%), Great Britain (69%), Australia (68%) and Italy (68%). Saudi Arabia (27%) had least expecting it to happen.

A rogue AI program that can’t be shutdown and could cause global havoc – 27% global citizens feared it could happen in 2022 ; markets agreeing most were Malaysia (56%), India (46%) and Turkey (43%). Markets agreeing least were Hungary (15%), Sweden (16%), Netherlands (18%), Denmark (18%) and Canada (18%).   

 

"Price will outpace incomes and escapism in the virtual world will grow, also strict laws for large tech companies by govt could happen are some of the predictions. Inflation, binge watching of content will be carry forwarded to 2022, believe most," added Adarkar.    

 

Other Predictions

There were predictions around the stock market crash, natural disaster, global IT shutdown due to hacking by a foreign govt., use of nuclear weapons, asteroid hitting the Earth, Aliens visiting the Earth etc.

 

Circa 2021 was a bad year for most!

77% of global citizens and 73% of urban Indians claim 2021 was a bad year for their country. Countries endorsing this view most were Romania (89%), South Korea (89%) and Spain (89%). Markets agreeing least were China (41%) and Saudi Arabia (48%).

 

2021 was also a bad year for them and their families. 58% of global citizens and 63% of Indians agreed. And the markets that held this view most were South Africa (77%), South Korea (74%) and Turkey (74%). And the markets least impacted were China (39%), Sweden (40%) and Netherlands (42%).

 

2022 Goals

 

3 in 4 global citizens (75%) and 4 in 5 urban Indians (80%) have resolved to do specific things for themselves and others in 2022. Markets holding this view most were - China (96%), Colombia (93%), Mexico (92%) and Peru (92%). And agreeing least were Sweden (23%) and Japan (44%). 

 

"The verdict is out. 2021 was a bad year for countries, individuals and their families. Citizens polled are going to prioritize themselves and work with their communities as they step into a spanking new year," Adarkar said.

(Ipsos India)

30 December 2021

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-in/happy-tidings-8-10-urban-indians-believe-circa-2022-will-be-better-2021-ipsos-predictions-2022