BUSINESS & POLITICS IN THE WORLD

 

GLOBAL OPINION REPORT NO. 727-728

 

 

Week: January 24 –February 06, 2022

 

Presentation: February 11, 2022

 

 

Contents

 

ASIA   20

Half Of Urban Indians (55%) Follow The Budget, And Many More Agree It Impacts Their Personal Finances. 21

Indian Premier League Tops YouGov’s 2022 Sports Buzz Rankings In India Yet Again. 23

Three-Quarters (76%) Of Singaporeans Who Typically Celebrate Chinese New Year Intend To Proceed With Celebrations This Year, As Compared To Only 60% Last Year 25

In The 21st Month Of The Epidemic, The Practice Of Remote Working In Companies Continues At A Rate Of Only 9% In Turkey. 28

In Turkey, 3 Out Of 4 Employees Want To Find A Solution To The Cost Of Lives If They Could. 29

MENA   33

The Summer Olympics Tops YouGov’s 2022 Sports Buzz Rankings In UAE.. 33

AFRICA.. 35

Three-Quarters (75%) Of Zambians Say The Previous Government Did A Poor Job Of Addressing The Needs Of Young People. 35

Seven In 10 Moroccans (70%) Want The Government To Continue To Permit Foreigners And Foreign Corporations To Set Up Retail Shops In The Country. 38

About One In Four Adult Citizens (27%) In Namibia Report Having Received At Least One Dose Of A Covid-19 Vaccine, According To The Survey In Late 2021. 40

WEST EUROPE.. 42

The YouGov Big Survey On Drugs; Four In Ten Britons (40%) Think That Uk Drug Laws Are Too Soft 42

More Than A Third Of Britons Cannot Afford To Heat Their Home To A Comfortable Level 44

7 In 10 Britons Dissatisfied With Boris Johnson As Prime Minister 48

By 48% To 38% Londoners Think Sadiq Khan Is Doing Badly As Mayor 50

Nine In Ten NHS Workers Say Their Workplace Has Seen Staff Shortages Due To COVID-19. 52

One In Ten Brits Are Interested In The NFL.. 54

Britons Lack Confidence In The Thoroughness, Independence And Likelihood Of Disciplinary Action From The Metropolitan Police Investigation Into Downing Street Parties. 56

Wordle: Starter Words, Hard Mode And X/6 - How Are Britons Playing The Hit Game. 57

Only 1 In 5 Think Boris Johnson Is Handling The Situation Between Russia And Ukraine Well, But Few Think Keir Starmer Would Do A Better Job. 60

53% Of French People Say That The Prices They Have Paid In Recent Weeks Generally Seem Higher Than They Were Six Months Ago. 62

The French Are Pessimistic About The Benefits Of Artificial Intelligence. 63

NORTH AMERICA.. 65

A Majority Of U S Adults (61%) Are Optimistic That The New Year Will Be Better Than The Year That Just Ended. 65

Republicans And Democrats Alike View Russia More As A Competitor Than An Enemy Of The U S. 68

In U S, Women More Likely Than Men To Report Feeling Empathy For Those Suffering. 71

More Adults Approve(46%) Than Disapprove (22%) Of U S Diplomatic Boycott Of Olympics; Few Have Heard Much About It 74

Public’s Views Of Supreme Court Turned More Negative Before News Of Breyer’s Retirement 77

Black Women Account For A Small Fraction (2%) Of The Federal Judges Who Have Served To Date. 84

Debate On Gains And Losses Of Remote Education During COVID 19. Is Hybrid Model For Children? The Best Views From USA.. 86

Academic, Emotional Concerns Outweigh COVID-19 Risks In Parents’ Views About Keeping Schools Open, Only A Few (9%) Say School Should Be Fully Online. 89

Half (52%) Of Canadians Agree Government Should Enact A Tax On Unvaccinated People. 93

AUSTRALIA.. 96

Nearly Two-Thirds Of Australians (65%) Say January 26 Should Be Known As ‘Australia Day’ – Up 6% Points On A Year Ago. 96

Inflation Expectations Dropped 0.1% Points To 4.8% In December; Down From Seven Year High In November 103

MULTICOUNTRY STUDIES. 107

Every Four-In-Ten Countries Worldwide Had Blasphemy Laws In 2019; A Survey Conducted In 198 Countries. 107

On A Global Level, 80% Of The World Population Think That Their Actions Can Help To Improve The Environment 110

Eastern NATO Members Soured On Russia Long Before Ukraine; According To A Study Across 14 Eastern European Countries And U S. 112

The Ipsos What Worries The World Study Carried Out In 28 Countries, Indicates That Covid-19 Is The Main Concern For 35% Of The World Population. 114

Should We Boycott The Winter Games In Beijing And The FIFA World Cup In Qatar; A Survey Conducted In 5 Countries. 116

19 Ways In Which Foreigners Have Been Accused Of Abusing Italian Food, Study Carried Out In 17 Countries. 117

What Impact Has Brexit Had On The EU; Yougov Asks 10 European Nations. 119

A Survey Carried Out In 28 Countries Shows That The Chinese, Hosts Of The Event, Are The Most (84%)  Interested In The Competition. 121

 


 

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

 

This weekly report consists of thirty-nine surveys. The report includes eight multi-country studies from different states across the globe.

 

727-728-43-40/Commentary: Debate On Gains And Losses Of Remote Education During COVID 19. Is Hybrid Model For Children? The Best Views From USA

One of the unfortunate consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic was that it forced many children to learn from home. It is now well-documented that remote learning resulted in substantial learning loss. The slowdown in academic progress was especially pronounced among Black students, Latino students and those from low-income households.

Yet, evidence from a 2020 NewSchools Venture Fund/Gallup study suggests that the quality of digital learning tools (websites, apps, online tutorials, online games and videos, or programs used to teach and support student learning and schoolwork) may have blunted the negative impact of remote schooling. Better student outcomes -- including ease of learning from home, confidence in schools' ability to provide high-quality education, and expectations for learning progress -- are strongly associated with the quality of digital learning tools, as reported by teachers, parents and students.

These results are based on web surveys conducted in July and August 2020, with 1,111 teachers, 2,345 parents and 1,088 students in grades three through 12. Student and parent responses were excluded if parents stated that their child did no distance learning in the spring of 2020 (less than 1% of the sample).

The findings indicate that universal access to digital learning tools will probably not generate gains for students nor equitable opportunities across groups of students unless the tools themselves are of high quality.

About one in five teachers, parents and students rated their digital learning tools as "excellent," less than the proportion who rated them as "fair" or "poor." The preponderant response -- comprising roughly half of answers -- was that digital learning tools were "good." There was remarkable consistency across teachers, parents and students in providing these ratings.

https://content.gallup.com/origin/gallupinc/GallupSpaces/Production/Cms/TGBCMS/g6cgkap00u6eouaitxe8da.png

Custom graphic. About one in five teachers (21%), parents (20%) and students (20%) rated their digital learning tools in the spring of 2020 as excellent, less than the proportion who rated them as fair or poor.

Teachers working in schools with a higher percentage of children from low-income households were less likely to rate digital learning tools as "excellent" or "good" than were teachers serving high-income students. In general, schools with a higher percentage of children from low-income families had lower-quality digital learning tools, according to their teachers.1 When comparing teachers at schools with less than 25% of students meeting eligibility criteria for reduced-price lunch to those with at least 75%, the gap in digital learning quality (using the share reporting "excellent" or "good") was 10.9 percentage points in favor of students from high-income households. This suggests that students in low-income schools had less access to the most useful digital tools.

https://content.gallup.com/origin/gallupinc/GallupSpaces/Production/Cms/TGBCMS/wazxa6q65kc9jy-enurs1w.png

Custom graphic. Teachers working in schools with a higher percentage of children from low-income households, at 67.4%, were less likely to rate digital learning tools used in the spring of 2020 as excellent or good than were teachers serving high-income students, at 78.3%.

Across teachers, parents and students, the quality of digital learning tools is strongly associated with several indicators of learning outcomes. These indicators measure the reported ease of learning from home, confidence in schools' ability to provide high-quality education, and expectations for learning progress in the subsequent semester.

When asked whether students found learning from home easy or hard compared with learning at school, teachers, parents and students who reported having high-quality learning technology were all more likely than those without that digital advantage to consider remote learning "easy" or "very easy." For instance, teachers who rated their digital learning tools as "excellent" were 32 percentage points more likely to say remote learning was easy or very easy, compared with teachers who rated their digital learning tools as "poor." The gaps in ease of learning reported by parents and students were 45 points and 13 points, respectively.

When asked about the upcoming fall semester of 2020, each group also expressed greater confidence in their school's ability to provide high-quality education when they reported having high-quality learning technology. To illustrate, we looked at the percentages of respondents who expressed high confidence in their school's ability (a "4" or "5" on a five-point scale) among two groups: those who gave digital learning tools an "excellent" rating and those who gave them a "poor" rating. Confidence in school ability was 31 percentage points higher among teachers who rated digital tools as "excellent" compared with those rating them "poor." The effect was even stronger for parents (38 points) and stronger still for students (44 points). Thus, across all groups, optimism about their school's ability to provide high-quality education was much higher when digital learning tools were perceived as high-quality.

Likewise, when asked whether students would learn more, the same or less than in a typical fall semester, each group was much more likely to expect learning gains to be on par with the standards or even above them when they rated digital learning tools as "excellent" compared with "poor." In this case, the gaps for teachers, parents and students were similar, at 28, 30 and 34 points, respectively.

To rule out whether the association between quality digital tools and educational outcomes simply reflects a bias toward positivity by certain respondents, or household income levels, we conducted additional research to test for those issues. Even when controlling for these factors, the results didn't change. Thus, we have confidence that there is a robust association. Details of this analysis are provided in the appendix.

Overall, these results suggest a strong connection between learning during the pandemic and the quality of digital learning tools. Moreover, there is remarkable agreement on the important relationship between technology and learning across students, parents and teachers. Taken at face value, these results provide compelling motivation to identify the best digital learning tools and make them more widely available. At the very least, doing so would likely raise students' and their supporters' confidence in making learning gains, boost expectations for exceeding standards, and ease the difficulty of learning from home.

Yet, there are several important limitations to this analysis, which point to opportunities for further research to test these findings more rigorously. The survey did not directly measure learning using objective, reliable metrics -- such as performance on standardized tests. However, subjective reports and expectations are often correlated with objective progress, so the positive association between digital learning and actual learning would likely hold using objective measures. Still, test score data would clarify the strength of the relationship and allow for comparisons to other well-studied interventions, like tutoring.

The same measurement limitation applies to the subjective evaluation of digital learning tools. These subjective measures should be considered alongside objective specifications or specific software. In future studies, researchers could ask students, parents and teachers to provide subjective ratings of specific digital tools to study the relationship between the two. Those data could then be used to identify the features of digital technology that predict higher ratings.

Beyond measurement challenges, another important limitation is that the association between technology and learning cannot be confidently interpreted as a causal effect because the quality of digital learning tools is not randomly assigned. More ambitious social science research could randomly assign students to use the highest-rated tools and test the effects on objective learning outcomes.

In the absence of those findings, the results here nonetheless should motivate school administrators to solicit feedback from teachers, parents and students about whether the digital tools they currently use are working for them. Even with most districts providing full-time in-person schooling, the quality of digital learning tools is likely to affect learning outcomes for the foreseeable future.

https://content.gallup.com/origin/gallupinc/GallupSpaces/Production/Cms/TGBCMS/wdjkibjbgegjpxd17u5kgq.png

Custom graphic. Better student outcomes -- including ease of learning from home, confidence in schools' ability to provide high-quality education, and expectations for learning progress -- are strongly associated with the quality of digital learning tools, as reported by teachers, parents and students.

(Gallup)

FEBRUARY 3, 2022

Source: https://news.gallup.com/opinion/gallup/388502/better-technology-produced-better-learning-outcomes-during-pandemic.aspx

 

727-728-43-41/Commentary: Academic, Emotional Concerns Outweigh COVID-19 Risks In Parents’ Views About Keeping Schools Open, Only A Few (9%) Say School Should Be Fully Online

Amid a surge of COVID-19 cases due to the omicron variant, a narrow majority of parents of K-12 students (53%) say schools in the United States should be providing a mix of in-person and online instruction this winter, according to a new Pew Research Center survey. Some 37% say K-12 schools should be providing in-person instruction only, while just 9% say schools should be fully online.

A bar chart showing that growing shares of K-12 parents say concerns about academics, emotional well-being should be major factors in decisions about keeping schools open

When asked what factors schools should consider in deciding whether to stay open for in-person instruction this winter, most parents of K-12 students say a lot of consideration should be given to the possibility that students will fall behind academically (67%) or that their emotional well-being will be negatively impacted (61%) if they don’t attend school in person. Smaller shares cite parents not being able to work if their children are home (52%), the risk to students or teachers of getting or spreading the coronavirus (43% and 39%, respectively), and the financial cost to school systems of following public health guidelines for safely keeping schools open (26%).

In July 2020, more K-12 parents said health risks to students (64%) and teachers (61%) should be given a lot of consideration in decisions about reopening schools than said the same about the possibility of students falling behind academically without in-person instruction (54%). By February 2021 – when many schools that had been providing online instruction were deciding whether to reopen for in-person instruction – six-in-ten parents said academic considerations should be a major factor, while smaller shares pointed to health risks to teachers (47%) or students (45%).

As has been the case throughout the pandemic, views about how schools should be handling instruction vary widely along party lines. Among parents of K-12 students, Republicans and those who lean Republican (55%) are far more likely than Democrats and Democratic leaners (26%) to say schools should be providing in-person instruction only this winter. A majority of Democratic parents (64%) – compared with 39% of Republican parents – say schools should be providing a mix of in-person and online instruction.

A chart showing that there are wide partisan gaps in whether health risks to students and teachers should be major factors in deciding whether to keep K-12 schools open this winter

Republican parents are more likely than Democratic parents to say a lot of consideration should be given to the possibility that students will fall behind academically or that their emotional well-being will be negatively impacted without in-person instruction. Republicans are also more likely than Democrats to say parents not being able to work if their children are home should be an important factor in these decisions. In turn, larger shares of Democratic than Republican parents say the risk to teachers and students of getting or spreading the coronavirus should be given a lot of consideration.

Views also vary across demographic groups. White parents (47%) are far more likely than non-White parents (25%) to say schools should be providing in-person instruction only this winter, while non-White parents are about three times as likely as White parents to say schools should be fully online (14% vs. 5%, respectively). (The non-White category includes parents who identify as Black, Asian, Hispanic, some other race or multiple races; these groups could not be analyzed separately due to sample size limitations.)

A bar chart showing that K-12 parents’ views about what type of instruction schools should be offering differ along demographic and party lines

Some 46% of upper-income parents and 43% of those with middle incomes say schools should be in-person only, compared with 28% of lower-income parents. Among lower-income parents, 16% say schools should be providing online instruction only; just 7% of those with middle incomes and an even smaller share of upper-income parents (2%) say the same.

These differences reflect, at least in part, the factors parents say should be given a lot of consideration in decisions about whether to keep schools open this winter. Non-White parents are more likely than White parents to say health risks to students (56% vs. 33%, respectively) and teachers (50% vs. 31%) should be major factors. By contrast, White parents (66%) are more likely than non-White parents (54%) to cite concerns that students’ emotional well-being will be negatively impacted if they don’t attend school in person. Similar shares of White (69%) and non-White (65%) parents say academic concerns should be given a lot of consideration.

Lower-income parents are more likely than those with middle or upper incomes to say the risk to students of getting or spreading COVID-19 should be given a lot of consideration in these decisions; those with upper incomes are the most likely to cite concerns about academics and students’ emotional well-being if they don’t attend school in person.

Most parents of K-12 students say their children are getting in-person instruction only

While a majority of parents think K-12 schools should be offering a mix of in-person and online instruction this winter, just 16% say this is the type of instruction their children are currently getting. About seven-in-ten (71%) say their children are getting in-person instruction only, while just 5% say their children are getting only online instruction. In October 2020, a plurality of K-12 parents (46%) said their children were getting online instruction only, while 20% said they were getting only in-person instruction and 23% said there was a mix.

A bar chart showing that most K-12 parents in the U.S. say their children are currently getting in-person instruction only, but experiences vary by family income level

Upper-income parents are the most likely to say their children are getting in-person instruction only: 84% say this in the new survey, compared with 77% of those with middle incomes and an even smaller share of those with lower incomes (58%). About one-in-ten lower-income parents (9%) say their children are getting online instruction only, while 23% say their children are getting a mix of in-person and online instruction. Just 3% of K-12 parents with middle incomes and 2% of those with upper incomes say their children are getting only online instruction, while about one-in-ten in each group say they are getting a mix.

(PEW)

FEBRUARY 4, 2022

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2022/02/04/academic-emotional-concerns-outweigh-covid-19-risks-in-parents-views-about-keeping-schools-open/

 

SUMMARY OF POLLS

ASIA

(India)

Half Of Urban Indians (55%) Follow The Budget, And Many More Agree It Impacts Their Personal Finances

Ahead of Budget 2022 which will be presented by the finance minister Nirmala Sitharaman on 1st February 2022, data from YouGov’s latest survey reveals three-quarters (74%) of urban Indians agree that income tax is important for the country’s economic development. Having said that, nearly two-thirds (65%) of them are unhappy about the current tax structure in the country and a higher proportion (77%) feels the tax structure should vary depending on a person's economic status.

(YouGov India)

January 28, 2022

 

Indian Premier League Tops YouGov’s 2022 Sports Buzz Rankings In India Yet Again

The Indian Premier League tops YouGov’s 2022 Sports Buzz Rankings in India for the second year in succession with a Buzz score of 50.8. Even in its 14th season and interrupted by COVID outbreaks which forced it to relocate to the UAE – the IPL continues to hold Indians in its thrall, creating a lot of positive Buzz. The rankings in YouGov’s 2022 Buzz Report are based on the Buzz scores, which measures whether respondents have heard something positive or negative about a brand recently.  

(YouGov India)
February 1, 2022

 

(Singapore)

Three-Quarters (76%) Of Singaporeans Who Typically Celebrate Chinese New Year Intend To Proceed With Celebrations This Year, As Compared To Only 60% Last Year

Two years on from the very first reported case of Covid-19 in the nation, Singapore’s Chinese New Year celebrations are set to be a comparatively muted affair for the second year running, following news that current safe management rules will stay in place during the festive season. Latest data from YouGov shows three-quarters (76%) of Singaporeans who typically celebrate Chinese New Year intend to proceed with celebrations this year, as compared to only 60% last year.

(YouGov Singapore)
January 28, 2022

 

(Turkey)

In The 21st Month Of The Epidemic, The Practice Of Remote Working In Companies Continues At A Rate Of Only 9% In Turkey

In the 21st month of the epidemic, the practice of remote working in companies continues at a rate of only 9%. The new working model, the hybrid working model, is applied in 8% of the companies. The working model foreseen at the end of the pandemic is the flexible-time working model. It is thought that remote and hybrid working models will be implemented in 10% of companies. Considering the first 3 problems experienced by the employees, it can be said that there is not much change. Today, employee motivation is stated as an even more important problem.

(Ipsos Turkey)

25 January 2022

 

In Turkey, 3 Out Of 4 Employees Want To Find A Solution To The Cost Of Lives If They Could

In the research carried out by the Ipsos research company; When employees in our country are asked what they would like to solve if they had the opportunity to solve a problem, 76% of them stated cost of living and inflation. Despite the rapid increase in the number of cases in the epidemic, the rate of those who say they would like to find a cure for the epidemic is 16%.45% of the employees state that there is a lack of workforce due to the fact that the employees in the workplace are caught or in contact with Covid-19, but it has no effect on production, while 11% state that it both causes a lack of labor and negatively affects production.

(Ipsos Turkey)

1 February 2022

 

MENA

(UAE)

The Summer Olympics Tops YouGov’s 2022 Sports Buzz Rankings In UAE

The Summer Olympics dethroned its nearest rival FIFA World Cup in YouGov’s 2022 Sports Buzz Rankings in the UAE to become the sports property with the most positive Buzz among the residents in the country (39.9). The quadrennial mega-event outscored the FIFA World Cup (which now holds the second position with a buzz score of 33.6) by more than six points. Formula 1 makes a strong showing to appear in third place (23.6) in our ranking.

(YouGov MENA)

February 1, 2022

 

AFRICA

(Zambia)

Three-Quarters (75%) Of Zambians Say The Previous Government Did A Poor Job Of Addressing The Needs Of Young People

Most Zambians say the previous government did a poor job of addressing the needs of young people, the latest Afrobarometer survey shows. Three-quarters (75%) of Zambians say the previous government did a poor job of addressing the needs of young people. Almost two-thirds (64%) of citizens say they would be “somewhat” or “strongly” supportive if the government decided to make people pay more taxes in order to support programs to help young people.

(Afrobarometer)

24 January 2022


(Morocco)

Seven In 10 Moroccans (70%) Want The Government To Continue To Permit Foreigners And Foreign Corporations To Set Up Retail Shops In The Country

Moroccans welcome open trade and see the United States as the best model for the country’s development, according to the latest Afrobarometer survey. Large majorities say that in order to develop, Morocco must trade with other countries and allow foreign businesses to operate in their country instead of protecting domestic producers from competition. Two-thirds (65%) of Moroccans say the country must rely on trade with the rest of the world in order to develop, including by opening its borders to foreign imports.

(Afrobarometer)

1 February 2022


(Namibia)

About One In Four Adult Citizens (27%) In Namibia Report Having Received At Least One Dose Of A Covid-19 Vaccine, According To The Survey In Late 2021

More than seven in 10 adult Namibians have not been vaccinated against COVID-19, and a majority of the unvaccinated say they are likely to stay that way, a recent Afrobarometer survey indicates. About one in four adult citizens (27%) report having received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, according to the survey in late 2021. Another 27% say they are at least “somewhat likely” to get vaccinated, while 43% say they are unlikely to do so.

(Afrobarometer)

3 February 2022

WEST EUROPE

(UK)

The YouGov Big Survey On Drugs; Four In Ten Britons (40%) Think That Uk Drug Laws Are Too Soft

Four in ten Britons (40%) think that UK drug laws are too soft, while one in five (19%) think they are too strict, and a quarter (24%) think they are about right. Men are more likely than women to think that UK laws on drugs are too strict (22% vs 15%). Younger Britons are also likely to see the drug laws as being too strict: 30% among those aged 18-24, compared to 21% of 25-39 year olds, and 12-17% among those aged 40 and older.

(YouGov UK)

January 24, 2022

 

More Than A Third Of Britons Cannot Afford To Heat Their Home To A Comfortable Level

A new YouGov survey reveals that more than a third (37%) of Britons say that, when it is very cold outside, they cannot afford to heat their home to a level where they are comfortably warm. This group is made up of 28% who say they can heat their home to a level where they’re warm, but not as warm as they would like to be, 7% who say they can only afford to stave off the worst of the cold and 2% who cannot afford to heat their home at all.

(YouGov UK)

January 26, 2022

 

7 In 10 Britons Dissatisfied With Boris Johnson As Prime Minister

Dissatisfaction levels with PM match those of Theresa May in her final months in office. 24% are satisfied with the job Boris Johnson is doing as Prime Minister (down 4 points from December), 70% are dissatisfied (up 5 points). His net satisfaction rating now stands at -46. This is Mr Johnson’s lowest net rating yet. This is only marginally better than John Majors net rating at this point in his tenure as PM (-50, May 1993).

(Ipsos MORI)

27 January 2022

 

By 48% To 38% Londoners Think Sadiq Khan Is Doing Badly As Mayor

Almost a year into Sadiq Khan's second term as Mayor of London, YouGov polling finds for the first time that Londoners tend think he's doing badly (48%) rather than well (38%) in the job. Our previous survey in late March/early April last year, prior to Khan’s re-election, had found Londoners split, with 45% saying he was doing well versus 42% who thought he was doing badly.

(YouGov UK)

January 27, 2022

 

Nine In Ten NHS Workers Say Their Workplace Has Seen Staff Shortages Due To COVID-19

A new YouGov survey of healthcare professionals reveals that 95% of NHS staff say their workplace has been affected by staff shortages due to COVID-19 recently. This includes nearly half (48%) who say their workplace has been affected to a “great” extent and 37% affected to a “moderate” extent. A mere 3% say they haven’t been affected by recent shortages. Some 18% say recently retired staff have returned to work to help plug the gap. A further 9% say their workplace is using volunteers to fill posts. 

(YouGov UK)

February 02, 2022

 

One In Ten Brits Are Interested In The NFL

Ahead of Super Bowl LVI, we take a look at the level of interest in the National Football League (NFL) in Britain and dig up some key insights into this audience base. YouGov Profiles data tells us that almost one in ten Brits (9%) are either somewhat interested in the NFL or say it’s one of their top interests. Two in five (39%) of those interested in NFL belong to that age group, while they constitute 35% of the general population.

(YouGov UK)

February 02, 2022

 

Britons Lack Confidence In The Thoroughness, Independence And Likelihood Of Disciplinary Action From The Metropolitan Police Investigation Into Downing Street Parties

New research by Ipsos in the UK shows half or more of Britons are not very confident, if at all, that the investigation currently being carried out by the Metropolitan Police into the alleged breaking of Coronavirus restrictions in Downing Street will be thorough, independent or result in disciplinary action for any found to have broken the rules. Only 4 in 10 (41%) are confident that the police investigation will be thorough while half (52%) say they are not very confident or not at all confident. In comparison, 51% were confident the civil service inquiry would be thorough, 45% were not.

(Ipsos MORI)

3 February 2022

 

Wordle: Starter Words, Hard Mode And X/6 - How Are Britons Playing The Hit Game

The game of the moment is Wordle, a simple pastime that gives players six chances to guess a five-letter word, providing clues based on whether they have guessed any correct letters and whether they are in the right place. The fact that you can only play Wordle once per day has some enthusiastic fans clicking on to the website at the stroke of midnight in order to get their latest fix, leading to at least one meme on the subject. Our survey shows that this midnight club constitutes 8% of British players. A further 29% get their daily Wordle game in before work at 9am, while another 25% will have made their guesses before noon.

(YouGov UK)

February 03, 2022

 

Only 1 In 5 Think Boris Johnson Is Handling The Situation Between Russia And Ukraine Well, But Few Think Keir Starmer Would Do A Better Job

As talks continue to try and stop Russia invading Ukraine, new research by Ipsos shows 1 in 5 Britons think Boris Johnson has done a good job of handling the ongoing situation (19%) while 2 in 5 (41%) think he’s done a bad job. Despite an overall negative view of Boris Johnson’s response to the situation in Ukraine, few believe the leader of the opposition would do a better job. One in 5 (22%) say Keir Starmer would do a better job than the current PM in responding to the situation between Ukraine and Russia, the same proportion say Boris Johnson would so a better job than the leader of the opposition.

(Ipsos MORI)

4 February 2022


(France)

53% Of French People Say That The Prices They Have Paid In Recent Weeks Generally Seem Higher Than They Were Six Months Ago

53% of French people say that the prices they have paid in recent weeks generally seem higher than they were six months ago (global average: 59%). The expenditure items that have increased the most according to the French are: Transport ( 72 %), Expenses ( 71 %), Food ( 66 %). 4 out of 10 French people expect an increase in their spending in the next three months.

(Ipsos France)

January 24, 2022

 

The French Are Pessimistic About The Benefits Of Artificial Intelligence

Ipsos questioned the French alongside 27 citizens of the world on the confidence they can have in artificial intelligence. The French are only 50% to understand what AI is (-14 pts compared to the global), and few (34%) have more confidence in companies using AI (-16 pts compared to the world average). One of the main reasons cited: lack of knowledge of products or services that require artificial intelligence (only 34% of French people say they know them, compared to 50% overall).

(Ipsos France)

January 26, 2022

 

NORTH AMERICA

(USA)

 A Majority Of U S Adults (61%) Are Optimistic That The New Year Will Be Better Than The Year That Just Ended

A majority of U.S. adults (61%) are optimistic that the new year will be better than the year that just ended, according to a new survey from Pew Research Center. Public satisfaction with national conditions remains low. Just 21% say they are satisfied with the way things are going in the country, while 78% are dissatisfied. The share expressing satisfaction with the state of the nation is down slightly since September (26%) and down 12 percentage points since last March (from 33%).

(PEW)

JANUARY 25, 2022

 

Republicans And Democrats Alike View Russia More As A Competitor Than An Enemy Of The U S

Overall, 49% of U.S. adults consider Russia a competitor of the U.S., while 41% say it is an enemy. Only 7% consider Russia a partner of the U.S. Republicans and Democrats have similar views of Russia’s relationship to the U.S.: Half of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents regard Russia as a competitor to the U.S., while 39% say it is an enemy. Among Democrats and Democratic leaners, 49% view Russia as a competitor, while 43% see it as an enemy.

(PEW)

JANUARY 26, 2022

 

In U S, Women More Likely Than Men To Report Feeling Empathy For Those Suffering

The Center recently asked Americans about their thoughts and feelings regarding human suffering in light of the pandemic and other recent tragedies, finding that women and men answered a few questions somewhat differently. Two-thirds of women (66%) say that in the past year, they have personally thought “a lot” or “some” about big questions such as the meaning of life, whether there is any purpose to suffering and why terrible things happen to people, compared with 55% of men who report the same.

(PEW)

JANUARY 28, 2022

 

More Adults Approve(46%) Than Disapprove (22%) Of U S Diplomatic Boycott Of Olympics; Few Have Heard Much About It

As the 2022 Winter Olympics begin later this week in China, more Americans say they approve (46%) than disapprove (22%) of the U.S. diplomatic boycott of the Games, while 31% are unsure. The diplomatic boycott, announced by the Biden administration in December to protest Chinese human rights abuses, has captured little public attention; about nine-in-ten U.S. adults (91%) say they have heard little (46%) or nothing at all (45%) about it, according to a Pew Research Center survey conducted Jan. 10-17.

(PEW)

JANUARY 31, 2022

 

Public’s Views Of Supreme Court Turned More Negative Before News Of Breyer’s Retirement

In a national survey by Pew Research Center, 54% of U.S. adults say they have a favorable opinion of the Supreme Court while 44% have an unfavorable view. The survey was conducted before Justice Stephen Breyer announced his retirement from the court and President Joe Biden reiterated his pledge to nominate the first Black woman to the Supreme Court to replace Breyer. Over the past three years, the share of adults with a favorable view of the court has declined 15 percentage points, according to the new survey, conducted Jan. 10-17 among 5,128 adults on the Center’s American Trends Panel.

(PEW)

FEBRUARY 2, 2022

 

Black Women Account For A Small Fraction (2%) Of The Federal Judges Who Have Served To Date

Only 70 of the 3,843 people who have ever served as federal judges in the United States – fewer than 2% – have been Black women, according to a biographical database maintained by the Federal Judicial Center, the research and education arm of the federal judiciary. That figure includes single-race, multiracial and Hispanic or Afro-Latina Black women who have served on federal courts governed by Article III of the U.S. Constitution, including the Supreme Court, 13 appeals courts and 91 district courts. It excludes appointees to non-Article III territorial courts in Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands and the Virgin Islands.

(PEW)

FEBRUARY 2, 2022

 

Debate On Gains And Losses Of Remote Education During COVID 19. Is Hybrid Model For Children? The Best Views From USA

Evidence from a 2020 NewSchools Venture Fund/Gallup study suggests that the quality of digital learning tools (websites, apps, online tutorials, online games and videos, or programs used to teach and support student learning and schoolwork) may have blunted the negative impact of remote schooling. These results are based on web surveys conducted in July and August 2020, with 1,111 teachers, 2,345 parents and 1,088 students in grades three through 12.

(Gallup)

FEBRUARY 3, 2022

 

Academic, Emotional Concerns Outweigh COVID-19 Risks In Parents’ Views About Keeping Schools Open, Only A Few (9%) Say School Should Be Fully Online

Amid a surge of COVID-19 cases due to the omicron variant, a narrow majority of parents of K-12 students (53%) say schools in the United States should be providing a mix of in-person and online instruction this winter, according to a new Pew Research Center survey. Some 37% say K-12 schools should be providing in-person instruction only, while just 9% say schools should be fully online.

(PEW)

FEBRUARY 4, 2022


(Canada)

Half (52%) Of Canadians Agree Government Should Enact A Tax On Unvaccinated People

A new Ipsos poll conducted on behalf of Global News reveals that this measure is divisive across the country - half (52%) of Canadians agree (25% strongly/27% somewhat) that the government should enact a tax on unvaccinated people, whereas another half (48%) disagree with this measure. Those aged 55+, who are more likely to have negative health effects from COVID-19, are more likely to be in support of this measure compared to other age groups (58% 55+, 47% 18-34, 50% 35-54).

(Ipsos Canada)

24 January 2022

 

AUSTRALIA

Nearly Two-Thirds Of Australians (65%) Say January 26 Should Be Known As ‘Australia Day’ – Up 6% Points On A Year Ago

There is quite a gender difference on the question with men favouring January 26 being known as ‘Australia Day’ rather than ‘Invasion Day’ by a margin of over 2:1 (70% cf. 30%). In contrast, Australia’s women are more evenly split with a narrow majority of 60% in favour of January 26 being known as ‘Australia Day’ compared to 40% saying it should be known as ‘Invasion Day’. Support for saying January 26 should be known as ‘Australia Day’ has grown for both genders compared to this time a year ago.

(Roy Morgan)

January 25 2022

 

Inflation Expectations Dropped 0.1% Points To 4.8% In December; Down From Seven Year High In November

Inflation Expectations are now 0.1% points above the long-term average of 4.7% and a large 1.2% points higher than a year ago in December 2020 (3.6%). A look at Inflation Expectations by socio-economic quintile shows increases across the board since the measure reached a low in August 2020 during Victoria’s second wave. Australians in the highest ‘AB Quintile’ have experienced the largest increase since mid-2020 with their Inflation Expectations rising 1.8% points to 4.1% in December 2021.

(Roy Morgan)

February 01 2022

 

MULTICOUNTRY STUDIES

Every Four-In-Ten Countries Worldwide Had Blasphemy Laws In 2019; A Survey Conducted In 198 Countries

A new Pew Research Center analysis finds that 79 countries and territories out of the 198 studied around the world (40%) had laws or policies in 2019 banning blasphemy, which is defined as speech or actions considered to be contemptuous of God or of people or objects considered sacred. Twenty-two countries (11%) had laws against apostasy, the act of abandoning one’s faith. The analysis draws on the Center’s wider body of research on global restrictions related to religion.

(PEW)

JANUARY 25, 2022

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2022/01/25/four-in-ten-countries-and-territories-worldwide-had-blasphemy-laws-in-2019-2/

 

On A Global Level, 80% Of The World Population Think That Their Actions Can Help To Improve The Environment

Global warming is an imminent phenomenon worldwide, considered as a threat to humanity by 86% of respondents (results remain similar to the ones obtained in 2020). In the American and African continents, the perception is higher (89% and 87%, respectively). Vietnam, Indonesia (both with 96%), Paraguay and Peru (with 94% each) are the countries reporting the highest number of citizens that consider global warming as a serious threat for mankind.

(WIN)

26 Jan 2022

Source: https://winmr.com/climate-change-and-sustainability-responsibility-and/

 

Eastern NATO Members Soured On Russia Long Before Ukraine; According To A Study Across 14 Eastern European Countries And U S

NATO and the U.S. on Wednesday rejected Russia's demand to roll back the alliance's presence in 14 Eastern European countries that became members after 1997. Since then, median approval across the mostly former Eastern bloc countries has never topped 30%, and disapproval has never dropped below 46%. In 2021, before the threat of a Russian invasion of Ukraine, nearly half (49%) disapproved.

(Gallup)

JANUARY 28, 2022

Source: https://news.gallup.com/opinion/gallup/389384/eastern-nato-members-soured-russia-long-ukraine.aspx

 

The Ipsos What Worries The World Study Carried Out In 28 Countries, Indicates That Covid-19 Is The Main Concern For 35% Of The World Population

Covid-19 is the main concern for 35% of the world population, on average, three points more than the previous month. The data reflects an increase in concern about the pandemic after it stood at 28% in November 2021, falling to third place in the ranking, the lowest level since its inclusion in this study. However, the picture is more relaxed than a year ago, when one in two people surveyed (50% on average) around the world said that Covid-19 was their main concern.

(Ipsos Spain)

February 1, 2022

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/es-es/la-preocupacion-por-el-covid-19-aumenta-hasta-el-41-en-espana-ante-el-avance-de-omicron

 

Should We Boycott The Winter Games In Beijing And The FIFA World Cup In Qatar; A Survey Conducted In 5 Countries

Nearly 7 out of 10 French people (66%) consider that it would be unacceptable to organize an international sports competition in North Korea. Similarly, Iran (59%) and Saudi Arabia (51%) are mostly contested by the French. 59% of Britons and 57% of French believe their country's players and sports teams should boycott an international sporting event if it takes place in a country with a poor human rights record. At the same time, we observe that a large proportion of the population (between 18% and 27%) does not express an opinion in the 5 countries covered by the study.

(YouGov France)
February 3, 2022

Source: https://fr.yougov.com/news/2022/02/03/boycott-competitions-sportives-internationales/

 

19 Ways In Which Foreigners Have Been Accused Of Abusing Italian Food, Study Carried Out In 17 Countries

Late last year, YouGov compiled a list of 19 ways in which foreigners have been accused of abusing Italian food, and asked people in 17 countries and territories (including Italy) whether they were acceptable or unacceptable. Of the list of 19, Italians see no problem with four: eating pizza for lunch (+89); having Bolognese sauce with spaghetti (+81); eating pizza with a fork rather than your hands (+69); and having meatballs with spaghetti (+58).

(YouGov Sweden)

February 3, 2022

Source: https://yougov.se/news/2022/02/03/italian-food-crimes/

 

What Impact Has Brexit Had On The EU; Yougov Asks 10 European Nations

French and German people are most likely to say Brexit has made no difference to the economy of the EU. Half (51%) of Germans and half (50%) of French people say Brexit has had not made a difference to the EU’s economy, while a quarter (26%) and a fifth (22%) respectively say Brexit has made the EU’s economy worse off. Hungarians were the only nationality polled who were clearly more likely to say the EU is worse off economically as a result of Brexit than ‘no difference’, by 42% to 34%.

(YouGov UK)

February 03, 2022

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/international/articles-reports/2022/02/03/what-impact-has-brexit-had-eu-yougov-asks-10-europ

 

A Survey Carried Out In 28 Countries Shows That The Chinese, Hosts Of The Event, Are The Most (84%)  Interested In The Competition

A survey carried out by Ipsos shows that 47% of Brazilians are interested in the Beijing Winter Olympics, which will be held in the Chinese capital starting next Friday, February 4th. In addition to Brazil, citizens of 27 other nations were interviewed. The interest of Brazilians in the sporting event follows the global average (46%). The Chinese, hosts of this edition of the Games, lead the ranking: 84% responded in the affirmative. Then come India and South Africa – 70% and 62%, respectively. 

(Ipsos Brazil)

4 February 2022

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/pt-br/47-dos-brasileiros-tem-interesse-pela-olimpiada-de-inverno-2022

 

ASIA

727-728-43-01/Polls

Half Of Urban Indians (55%) Follow The Budget, And Many More Agree It Impacts Their Personal Finances

Ahead of Budget 2022 which will be presented by the finance minister Nirmala Sitharaman on 1st February 2022, data from YouGov’s latest survey reveals three-quarters (74%) of urban Indians agree that income tax is important for the country’s economic development.

Out of the surveyed respondents, currently, 55% claim to pay taxes while others do not. Among these taxpayers, three in five (75%) agree to happily pay their income tax without any enforcement.

Having said that, nearly two-thirds (65%) of them are unhappy about the current tax structure in the country and a higher proportion (77%) feels the tax structure should vary depending on a person's economic status.

Data shows that about half of the urban Indians follow the union budget every year (47%) and close to three in ten (27%) follow it sometimes. Furthermore, two-thirds (67%) claim the budget to have an impact on their personal finances. Respondents who self-identified as middle class or upper-middle class are most likely to both follow the budget and believe it has an impact on their personal income. People who self-identified as poor and/or rich, tend not to follow the budget and believe it has a lower impact on their personal incomes.

80% of the self-identified poor respondents think a tax rate of 5% is fair for them to pay while 25% of the rest agree on a tax rate of 10% as fair for them to pay. 

When asked about their expectations from the upcoming budget, almost two in five (38%) urban Indians said they expect the government to raise the income tax exemption limit to ₹5 lakh from the current one. This was the leading expectation for people who identified themselves as poor or middle class.

About three in ten (31%) feel that the overall tax exemption limit should be increased from the present 1.5 lakhs, while a higher number (32%) wants the government to ease the tax burden on the salaried class by increasing the limit of the standard deduction from the existing Rs 50,000. Those aged 40 and above are most likely to have these expectations as compared to the younger age groups.

Keeping the pandemic and rising medical expenses in mind, more than a third (35%) expect the Covid treatment-related expenses to be made a separate item under tax deductions, while some (30%) expect the finance minister to increase deductions for medical expenses under 80D.

Increased tax deduction on housing loan interest is also an expectation of the salaried class in India. Interestingly, millennials (32%) are most likely to expect this tax incentive as compared to Gen X (28%) and Gen Z (19%).

Paying income tax is a legal obligation for citizens of the country but there are some professions (like farmers) that are currently exempted from paying income tax. When asked about different professions that should come under the ambit of taxation, about six in ten (60%) urban Indians feel farmers should not pay any taxes, whereas 35% feel they should be taxed like all other citizens.

Likewise, in the case of armed forces, half of the respondents in India feel that they should be exempted from paying taxes, while 44% believe they should be subjected to taxation. As in the case of police (64% vs 25%) and doctors (65% vs 17%), the numbers are higher for those who feel they should be paying similar taxes as all citizens as compared to those who feel they should be paying no taxes.

Whereas for businessmen, that is thought to be the richer class in India, more than half (51%) of the respondents are of the opinion that they should be paying a higher income tax than other citizens. Comparatively, a lesser proportion feels that they should be paying the same tax as all citizens (37%) or should be paying no taxes at all (12%).

(YouGov India)

January 28, 2022

Source: https://in.yougov.com/en-hi/news/2022/01/28/half-urban-indians-follow-budget-and-many-more-agr/

 

727-728-43-02/Polls

Indian Premier League Tops YouGov’s 2022 Sports Buzz Rankings In India Yet Again

  • Despite Covid interruptions & phase 2 of IPL moving to UAE, the league became the country’s buzziest sports event in 2021
  • With India’s best-ever haul of 7 medals, the Summer Olympics came a close second, making a new entry in this year’s list
  • India’s indigenous football league ISL managed to retain its fifth rank
  • Both ICC Cricket World Cup & FIFA World Cup drop down one place to third and fourth, recording a slight decline in their year-on-year buzz scores

The Indian Premier League tops YouGov’s 2022 Sports Buzz Rankings in India for the second year in succession with a Buzz score of 50.8. Even in its 14th season and interrupted by COVID outbreaks which forced it to relocate to the UAE – the IPL continues to hold Indians in its thrall, creating a lot of positive Buzz.

YouGov SportsIndex measures the public’s perception of sports brands on a daily basis across a range of metrics. The rankings in YouGov’s 2022 Buzz Report are based on the Buzz scores, which measures whether respondents have heard something positive or negative about a brand recently.  

https://d25d2506sfb94s.cloudfront.net/cumulus_uploads/inlineimage/2022-02-01/India%20chart%201.png

As India recorded its best-ever performance in the Olympics with a haul of seven medals, including a gold, it’s unsurprising to see the Olympics coming a close second (49.2) and making a new entry in this year’s rankings. In fact, IPL only just pips the games by a margin of 1.6 points.

Even though India failed to qualify the knockout stage, the ICC Cricket World Cup managed to secure the third-place (45.9), but its buzz score recorded a slight decline (of -0.4) compared to last year. FIFA World Cup also noticed a decline in its year-on-year score and moved down one place to fourth (28.3).

On the other hand, India’s indigenous football league- the Indian Super League managed to hold on to its fifth position (20.4), further cementing itself in the country’s sporting landscape. The Pro Kabaddi League, however, recorded a drop of three places to seventh compared to last year’s rankings (from 23.1 to 17.9).

In the sixth spot is the Wimbledon Championship with a buzz score of 18.0 and the Australia Open takes the tenth (13) place.

Finally, completing the top ten list for India is the Asian Games and World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE), securing the eighth(15.3) and ninth place (13.3), respectively.

About YouGov SportsIndex

SportsIndex is one of YouGov Sport’s signature tools. It operates in 35 markets around the world, tracking 200 key domestic and international competitions across more than 30 sports.  A core of 21 properties is tracked in every market, allowing for international comparison. Many other events, leagues and tournaments appear in multiple markets; while some competitions are tracked only in the country which hosts them.

In every market, YouGov takes a list of the leading sports properties – a mix of domestic and international events, competitions and leagues – and, based on 700,000 surveys annually, measures the public’s perceptions of them.

Every day, and for every property on our list, we track 16 separate brand metrics, providing a treasure chest of data for sports marketers and administrators.

SportsIndex gives our clients the capability to do everything from measuring the effect of yesterday’s news headlines to establishing a season-on-season trend stretching back years. And because it operates internationally, users can track and compare properties across the world.

Methodology

The 2022 Buzz Report provides insight into all the sports events we monitor against just one of the 16 metrics we measure – ‘Buzz’.

Every day, we ask 100 people these questions...

“Over the past two weeks, which of the following sports events/leagues have you heard something positive about?” and “Now which of the following sports/events leagues have you heard something negative about over the past two weeks?”

From the answers we collect, we derive a Buzz score for each event.

What’s a Buzz score?

Our Buzz score is the difference between the percentage of respondents hearing positive news and the percentage hearing negative news about an event in the previous two weeks. So, depending on what is going on, an event’s Buzz score can reveal whether conversations around a property are positive or negative at a point in time. Here is a graph charting the US Buzz score for the FIFA Women’s World Cup over 2018 which shows how this metric can change over time.

https://d25d2506sfb94s.cloudfront.net/cumulus_uploads/inlineimage/2022-02-01/india%20chart%202.png

Buzz scores can range from +100 (where everyone we asked has heard something positive) to -100 (where everyone we asked has heard something negative). A completely neutral score, therefore, would be zero. A score of 45 would show positive sentiment towards a property, by a margin of 45 percentage points.

For our Buzz rankings here, we look at the highest average Buzz score each property has scored each calendar month. Then we take the highest of those twelve scores and compare them with the highest monthly scores of every other property we track in that market. We track up to 80 properties in each country but for the sake of this report, we display only the top ten in each market overall (typically a mix of domestic and international). In addition, we show a top five or top ten ranking for each market for those competitions hosted or held (in part or in their entirety) in each market over the year.

(YouGov India)
February 1, 2022

Source: https://in.yougov.com/en-hi/news/2022/02/01/indian-premium-league-tops-yougovs-2022-sports-buz/

 

727-728-43-03/Polls

Three-Quarters (76%) Of Singaporeans Who Typically Celebrate Chinese New Year Intend To Proceed With Celebrations This Year, As Compared To Only 60% Last Year

Two years on from the very first reported case of Covid-19 in the nation, Singapore’s Chinese New Year celebrations are set to be a comparatively muted affair for the second year running, following news that current safe management rules will stay in place during the festive season. Latest data from YouGov shows three-quarters (76%) of Singaporeans who typically celebrate Chinese New Year intend to proceed with celebrations this year, as compared to only 60% last year.

Their enthusiasm can perhaps be attributed to the confidence in government’s handling of the current pandemic situation. More than half feel current Covid-19 safety measures are sufficient (42%) or should be loosened (12%).

Among the various age groups, younger respondents are more assured, with almost half (47%) of Gen Z respondents sharing that they feel safe participating in the celebrations this year, and only 8% feeling unsafe about the celebrations. The proportion of those who feel unsafe increases progressively across the Millennial (12%), Gen X (12%), Baby Boomer (15%) and Silent Generation (20%) groups, with the Silent Generation expressing the most concern toward safety.

Talking about the way their preparations have been affected due to the pandemic, close to two thirds of Singaporeans who intend to celebrate (64%) said they plan to do less house visiting this year, while half (49%) will host less visitors at home – a possible effect of the cap of five unique house visitors a day to limit social gatherings.

Traditional customs such as buying and wearing new clothes or decorating one’s house for the festive season also seem to have taken a hit, as less than half (45%) said they will spend less on shopping for the season and one in three (31%) will reduce their spending on decorations.  

Another tradition that saw impact amid Covid-19 was that of the giving and receiving of red packets, or ang pao. Among those who usually celebrate the season, four in five (79%) intend to give out ang pao this year, similar to the proportion last year (77%).

Comparing against data collected last year, a greater proportion of individuals will be giving red packets of the same amount as usual (57% in 2022 versus 47% in 2021), and less will be giving red packets of a smaller amount (20% in 2022 versus 28% in 2021). With more reverting to giving usual amounts in their ang pao, this paints a brighter picture of financial recovery among residents.

(YouGov Singapore)
January 28, 2022

Source: https://sg.yougov.com/en-sg/news/2022/01/28/despite-rising-covid-cases-majority-singaporeans-l/

 

727-728-43-04/Polls

In The 21st Month Of The Epidemic, The Practice Of Remote Working In Companies Continues At A Rate Of Only 9% In Turkey

According to the data compiled from white-collar employees;

In the 21st month of the epidemic, the practice of remote working in companies continues at a rate of only 9%. The new working model, the hybrid working model, is applied in 8% of the companies.

The working model foreseen at the end of the pandemic is the flexible-time working model. It is thought that remote and hybrid working models will be implemented in 10% of companies.

Considering the first 3 problems experienced by the employees, it can be said that there is not much change. Today, employee motivation is stated as an even more important problem.

Although the fringe benefits that employees expect from companies have decreased considerably compared to May 2021, white-collar workers who work remotely still have high expectations for fringe benefits.

gelecek-4

(Ipsos Turkey)

25 January 2022

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/tr-tr/iste-gelecek

 

727-728-43-05/Polls

In Turkey, 3 Out Of 4 Employees Want To Find A Solution To The Cost Of Lives If They Could

3 out of 4 Employees Want to Find a Solution to Cost of Living / High Inflation

In the research carried out by the Ipsos research company; When employees in our country are asked what they would like to solve if they had the opportunity to solve a problem, 76% of them stated cost of living and inflation. Despite the rapid increase in the number of cases in the epidemic, the rate of those who say they would like to find a cure for the epidemic is 16%.

1 in 2 Employees Think the Coronavirus Outbreak Is Having a Negative Impact on Their Jobs

In the "Coronavirus Epidemic and Society" survey, which has been conducted weekly since the beginning of the epidemic, only by the Ipsos research company in our country, at the end of December, the rate of those who thought that the epidemic would have a negative impact on their business was 43%, while this rate increased by 8 points to 51% in the last 1 month. It has risen to . The rate of those who think that the epidemic will not have any effect on their business has decreased by 5 points to 35%.

The Proportion of Employees Who Stated That Their Caught or Contact with Covid-19 Caused Lack of Workforce 56%

More than half of the employees are of the opinion that the epidemic has a negative impact on the workforce. 45% of the employees state that there is a lack of workforce due to the fact that the employees in the workplace are caught or in contact with Covid-19, but it has no effect on production, while 11% state that it both causes a lack of labor and negatively affects production.

50% of the Employees find the Decision to End the Quarantine Period and Return to Work Without the Requirement of PCR Tests for Those Caught Covid-19 at the End of 7 Days, and 60% of the Employees find the Decision of the Persons in Contact with These Persons to Go to Work as long as they do not show any symptoms.

Only 1/3 of the employees think that the decision to shorten the quarantine period in the Corona virus epidemic and not to ask for PCR test after the quarantine is correct. The rate of those who think they found it wrong is 50%. And again, a similar proportion of people are uncomfortable working in the same environment as people who return to work in this way.

60% of the employees do not feel comfortable with the decision to end the quarantine period at the end of 7 days and to return to work without the need for a PCR test, and the decision to allow people in contact with these people to go to work as long as they do not show any symptoms. Gets Wrong

The rate of those who think that the decision to come to work if they have no symptoms is wrong is higher (60%), and again, half of the employees state that they do not feel comfortable being in the same environment with these people.

The Proportion of Employees Who Have the Opinion that Those Who Returned to Work After These Decisions Have No Effect on the Workforce 71%

7 out of 10 employees think that returning to work after 7 days of Covid-19, or that people who are in contact but do not have symptoms continue to come to work have neither a positive nor a negative impact on their work force. Only 12% think that it has a positive impact on the workforce.

Ece Ertürk, Qualitative and Social Research Turkey Leader of Ipsos, made the following comments:

Despite the many changing and transforming dynamics of the pandemic itself, one of the most fundamental things that does not change is its perceived negative effects on our lives. In relation to the recent economic developments, 1 out of every 2 people in the society started to think that the pandemic will have a negative impact on their business life, with an increase of 8 points, especially in the past 1 month. One of the negative reflections on business life is the effect of the epidemic on the workforce. Negative effects began to occur in the workforce due to the fact that the employees were Covid-19 or were in contact; More than half of the employees think that there has been a lack of labor in their workplaces in the last 1 month due to the increasing number of cases and contact status. However, although there is an increase in the rate of those who think that the epidemic will adversely affect their business, the risk in production capacity seems to have been managed, because a significant part of them says that there was no loss of workforce due to the epidemic, or it happened to such an extent that it did not affect production.

 

While it is aimed not to adversely affect the workforce and production, half of the employees think that the decision to complete the quarantine period in 7 days and return to work without a PCR test in line with the latest application changes is a wrong decision, and half of the employees are uncomfortable working in the same environment with people who return to work in this way. The fact that employees who do not show symptoms despite being in contact can come to work without quarantine creates dissatisfaction. Those who think that this relaxation will have a positive effect on the workforce are also quite limited. This relaxation and flexibility in business life is likely to put employees in a more anxious and restless mood; For this reason, the psychological effects of this issue and its effect on productivity should not be ignored in the coming days. Because the concerns about the epidemic continue, people are not comfortable working in the same environment with their friends who have had a new illness or contacted them, according to the relaxed quarantine procedure.

While the dynamics in business life continue in this direction, there is one very striking issue that despite the epidemic, the most important agenda in Turkey is the economy; And every issue is ultimately tied to the economy. The cost of living and the desire to find a solution to inflation are by far the most important issue for employees as well. When it comes to the economy, cost of living, purchasing power, etc., we see that the problems brought about by the epidemic have lost some of their importance. Even though it is a global problem that affects life in many dimensions, such as an epidemic, the economy is again and again at the top as the main issue that the society expects a solution. These people, who are able to produce, would prefer to fix the economy, not the epidemic, if there was only one chance. This will be the test of our country in 2022.

(Ipsos Turkey)

1 February 2022

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/tr-tr/ulkemizde-her-4-calisandan-3u-imkani-olsa-hayat-pahaliligina-cozum-bulmak-istiyor

 

                                                                     MENA

727-728-43-06/Polls

The Summer Olympics Tops YouGov’s 2022 Sports Buzz Rankings In UAE

  • The Summer Olympics dethroned FIFA World Cup to become the buzziest sports event in UAE
  • The FIFA Club World Cup, which was postponed & is now scheduled to happen in the UAE, appears fourth in the rankings
  • With Max Verstappen’s hotly debated victory in the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix, Formula 1 unsurprisingly made its way to the top five on the list
  • Besides Football, cricket leagues have also featured prominently in this year’s rankings

The Summer Olympics dethroned its nearest rival FIFA World Cup in YouGov’s 2022 Sports Buzz Rankings in the UAE to become the sports property with the most positive Buzz among the residents in the country (39.9). The quadrennial mega-event outscored the FIFA World Cup (which now holds the second position with a buzz score of 33.6) by more than six points.

YouGov SportsIndex measures the public’s perception of sports brands on a daily basis across a range of metrics. The rankings in YouGov’s 2022 Buzz Report are based on the Buzz scores, which measures whether respondents have heard something positive or negative about a brand recently.  

https://d25d2506sfb94s.cloudfront.net/cumulus_uploads/inlineimage/2022-02-01/uae%20chart%201.png

Formula 1 makes a strong showing to appear in third place (23.6) in our ranking. The Abu Dhabi Grand Prix, which took place in December, was the deciding race for both the drivers’ and the constructors’ championships. The winners were eventually determined by a finish which saw Max Verstappen overtake challenger Lewis Hamilton on the final lap in some hotly disputed circumstances.

The FIFA Club World Cup is placed fourth (23.5) in our ranking this year, losing out on third by just a tenth of a point. The event was earlier scheduled to take place in Japan in 2021, had to be shifted due to the Covid restrictions there, and is now finally happening in the UAE in Feb 2022.

The past year also looked favorable for other football-related sports properties. The UEFA Champions League climbs up one place to take the fifth position, recording a change in score of +2.9. LA Liga takes the seventh (20.6) place, while the English Premier League makes a new entry at ninth (19.1).

Besides football, cricket leagues have also featured prominently in this year’s rankings. ICC Cricket World Cup appears at sixth (21.0) and ICC World Twenty20, which took place in the UAE, occupies the tenth (19.0) place. Unfortunately, the Indian Premier League did not make it to the top ten in 2021 (it came top in 2020), even though part of the event was again hosted in the UAE following COVID outbreaks in India.

Finally, the Dubai Marathon remains in the eighth position (20.2) as last year and completes the top ten list in the UAE.

About YouGov SportsIndex

SportsIndex is one of YouGov Sport’s signature tools. It operates in 35 markets around the world, tracking 200 key domestic and international competitions across more than 30 sports.  A core of 21 properties is tracked in every market, allowing for international comparison. Many other events, leagues, and tournaments appear in multiple markets; while some competitions are tracked only in the country which hosts them.

In every market, YouGov takes a list of the leading sports properties – a mix of domestic and international events, competitions, and leagues – and, based on 700,000 surveys annually, measures the public’s perceptions of them.

Every day, and for every property on our list, we track 16 separate brand metrics, providing a treasure chest of data for sports marketers and administrators.

SportsIndex gives our clients the capability to do everything from measuring the effect of yesterday’s news headlines to establishing a season-on-season trend stretching back years. And because it operates internationally, users can track and compare properties across the world.

(YouGov MENA)

February 1, 2022

Source: https://mena.yougov.com/en/news/2022/02/01/summer-olympics-tops-yougovs-2022-sports-buzz-rank/

 

AFRICA

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Three-Quarters (75%) Of Zambians Say The Previous Government Did A Poor Job Of Addressing The Needs Of Young People

Most Zambians say the previous government did a poor job of addressing the needs of

young people, the latest Afrobarometer survey shows.

A strong majority of citizens also say they would be willing to pay more taxes in order to

support programs to help young people.

If the government could spend more to help youth, job creation and education would be

Zambians’ top priorities for additional investment.

Key findings

▪ Three-quarters (75%) of Zambians say the previous government did a poor job of

addressing the needs of young people (Figure 1).

o The view that the government failed to address youth needs is particularly

common among rural residents (79%), less educated citizens (79%), and poor

respondents (83%) (Figure 2).

▪ Almost two-thirds (64%) of citizens say they would be “somewhat” or “strongly”

supportive if the government decided to make people pay more taxes in order to

support programs to help young people (Figure 3).

▪ Job creation (39%) and education (26%) would be Zambians’ top priorities for

additional government investment to help young people, followed by business loans

(12%), social services (12%), and job training (10%) (Figure 4).

(Afrobarometer)

24 January 2022

Source: https://afrobarometer.org/sites/default/files/press-release/Zambia/news_release-zambians_want_more_government_action_to_help_young_people-afrobarometer-21jan22_.pdf

 

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Seven In 10 Moroccans (70%) Want The Government To Continue To Permit Foreigners And Foreign Corporations To Set Up Retail Shops In The Country

Moroccans welcome open trade and see the United States as the best model for the

country’s development, according to the latest Afrobarometer survey.

Large majorities say that in order to develop, Morocco must trade with other countries and

allow foreign businesses to operate in their country instead of protecting domestic producers

from competition.

They are divided as to whether the country should fund national development through its

own resources or rely on foreign loans.

Key findings

▪ Two-thirds (65%) of Moroccans say the country must rely on trade with the rest of the

world in order to develop, including by opening its borders to foreign imports (Figure

1).

▪ Seven in 10 Moroccans (70%) want the government to continue to permit foreigners

and foreign corporations to set up retail shops in the country to ensure that citizens

have a wide choice of low-cost consumer goods (Figure 2).

▪ The United States is the most popular model for the future development of Morocco,

cited by 50% of respondents – three times as many as prefer France and China (16%

each) (Figure 3).

▪ Half (50%) of Moroccans say the country should finance its development from its own

resources, even if it means that citizens pay more taxes, while 43% would instead use

external loans (Figure 4).

(Afrobarometer)

1 February 2022

Source: https://afrobarometer.org/sites/default/files/press-release/Morocco/news_release-moroccans_want_to_finance_their_own_development-afrobarometer-ma-bh-1feb22.pdf

 

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About One In Four Adult Citizens (27%) In Namibia Report Having Received At Least One Dose Of A Covid-19 Vaccine, According To The Survey In Late 2021

More than seven in 10 adult Namibians have not been vaccinated against COVID-19,

and a majority of the unvaccinated say they are likely to stay that way, a recent

Afrobarometer survey indicates.

About one in four adult citizens (27%) report having received at least one dose of a

COVID-19 vaccine, according to the survey in late 2021. Another 27% say they are at

least “somewhat likely” to get vaccinated, while 43% say they are unlikely to do so.

Among those who say they probably will not get vaccinated, distrust of regulatory

agencies and the vaccine itself is by far the most commonly cited reason.

Vaccine hesitancy may have important implications for the country’s vulnerability to future

waves of infections as well as its economic recovery, especially in the international tourism

sector.

Key findings

▪ As of October-November 2021, only about one-quarter (27%) of adult Namibians say

they have received one or more doses of a COVID-19 vaccine (Figure 1).

o Another 27% say they are “somewhat likely” or “very likely” to try to get the

vaccine.

o More than four in 10 (43%) say they are “somewhat unlikely” or “very unlikely” to

try to get vaccinated.

▪ Among those who don’t see themselves getting the jab, by far the most common

reason (cited by 55% of respondents) is that they do not trust that the vaccine is safe

and effective (Figure 2).

o One in 10 (10%) believe popular misconceptions about the vaccine causing

infertility or COVID-19 or being used to track recipients. A further 10% are skeptical

about the real extent of the risks associated with contracting COVID-19.

▪ To date, uptake of COVID-19 vaccinations is particularly low among the youngest

adults (17% of 18- to 25-year-olds). Fewer women than men (23% vs. 31%) have

received the jab. Namibians with a tertiary education (40%) have nearly double the

vaccine uptake of the rest of the nation (Figure 3).

(Afrobarometer)

3 February 2022

Source: https://afrobarometer.org/sites/default/files/press-release/Namibia/nam_r9.news_release_1_-_vaccine_hesitancy_-_3_feb_2022.pdf

 

WEST EUROPE

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The YouGov Big Survey On Drugs; Four In Ten Britons (40%) Think That Uk Drug Laws Are Too Soft

Four in ten Britons (40%) think that UK drug laws are too soft, while one in five (19%) think they are too strict, and a quarter (24%) think they are about right.

Men are more likely than women to think that UK laws on drugs are too strict (22% vs 15%). Younger Britons are also likely to see the drug laws as being too strict: 30% among those aged 18-24, compared to 21% of 25-39 year olds, and 12-17% among those aged 40 and older.

For the purposes of this study, we refer to soft drugs (such as cannabis or speed) and hard drugs (such as cocaine or heroin).

Three in ten Britons (30%) think that the possession of soft drugs such as cannabis should be legal providing it is for personal use only. A third (33%) think possessing soft drugs for personal use should be illegal but treated as a minor offence, while a quarter (25%) say it should be a criminal offence.

A political breakdown of the results shows that twice as many Labour voters as Conservatives (41% vs 19%) back legalising the possession of soft drugs.

When asked whether selling soft drugs should be legal, one in five Britons (19%) support this. Again, there is a strong political divide here: 10% of Conservative voters support the idea, compared to nearly a quarter (23%) of those who voted Labour.

One in four (24%) think the sale of soft drugs should be illegal but not criminalised, while nearly half of Britons (47%) think this should be a criminal offence.

Two-thirds of Britons (64%) who say they take hard/soft drugs think that the sale of soft drugs should be legalised, while just 7% of them say it should be a criminal offence.

Six percent of Britons think that possessing hard drugs – such as heroin or cocaine – for personal use should be legal.

Seven in ten Britons (70%) think that the possession of hard drugs should be a criminal offence, with significantly more Conservatives (85%) than Labour voters (60%) backing this.

One in six (16%) say possessing hard drugs should be considered a minor offence. Again, this view is shared more by Labour (24%) than Conservative (7%) voters.

A quarter of Britons who currently use hard/soft drugs (26%) say possessing hard drugs should be legal, half (51%) think it should be a minor offence, while 22% say it should be a criminal offence.

The story is different when it comes to the issue of selling hard drugs: just 3% of Britons support legalising this and 6% say it should be illegal but a minor offence. Eight in ten (83%) think that the sale of hard drugs should be a criminal offence.

Overall, men are more likely than women to be more lenient when it comes to the legality of drug possession and selling. Older Britons – those aged 60 and above ­– tend to take a somewhat harder line on the issue than younger age groups.

(YouGov UK)

January 24, 2022

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/lifestyle/articles-reports/2022/01/24/yougov-big-survey-drugs-should-possessing-or-selli

 

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More Than A Third Of Britons Cannot Afford To Heat Their Home To A Comfortable Level

The cost of heating is spiralling in the UK, with bills forecast to rise by 50% this year without government intervention.

A new YouGov survey reveals that more than a third (37%) of Britons say that, when it is very cold outside, they cannot afford to heat their home to a level where they are comfortably warm.

This group is made up of 28% who say they can heat their home to a level where they’re warm, but not as warm as they would like to be, 7% who say they can only afford to stave off the worst of the cold and 2% who cannot afford to heat their home at all.

Half (49%) of people from very low-income households (with a combined income of less than £15,000 a year), say they cannot afford to heat their home to a comfortable temperature when it is very cold outside. Of this, a third (32%) say they can heat their homes to a level where they’re warm, but not as warm as they would like, 11% who can stave off the worst of the cold and 6% who cannot afford to heat their homes at all.

The proportion of people who say they can’t afford to heat their homes comfortably falls as household income increases - however, a quarter (25%) of those living in households making more than £50,000 a year still say they can’t afford to heat their home to a temperature where they are comfortably warm.

The majority of Britons tend to avoid putting the heating on if they feel cold – but men are more likely to put it on than women

Just 16% of Britons say that putting the heating on, or turning it up, would be the first thing they would do if they felt cold in their home and were already warmly dressed.

More than half (54%) would get a blanket before they turned the heating up, while 49% would put another layer of warm clothes on and 46% would warm up with a hot drink.

A fifth (22%) would get a hot water bottle, and the same proportion would move around to try and warm up. Around one in six (17%) Britons would get back into bed if they were feeling cold at home and one in 12 (8%) would use a portable heater.

Men and women cope with the cold differently – men are twice as likely as women to turn the heating on straight away if they were warmly dressed at home and they felt cold, by 22% to 11%. Women are much more likely than men to say they would get a blanket (67% to 39%) or have a hot drink (54% to 37%).

In addition, while a third (32%) of women would get a hot water bottle before putting the heating on, this figure is just 12% for men.

What reasons do Britons have for not putting turning the heating up as their first solution for being cold?

For people who don’t put the heating on first if they feel cold, the majority are either actively trying to save money or can’t afford to keep their homes warm.

Half (51%) of those who said they would not put the heating on straight away if they were cold say that, while they could afford to, they would rather save the money. Another quarter (25%) say they can’t afford to heat their home as much as they would like.

Britons over 65 were twice as likely to say they can’t afford to heat their home as much as they’d like to than those aged 18 to 24, by 30% to 15%. Similarly, 50% of older Britons say they prefer to save money over putting the heating on, compared to 40% of younger ones.

(YouGov UK)

January 26, 2022

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2022/01/26/more-third-britons-cannot-afford-heat-their-home-c

 

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7 In 10 Britons Dissatisfied With Boris Johnson As Prime Minister

  • Dissatisfaction levels with PM match those of Theresa May in her final months in office
  • 6 in 10 think the Conservatives should change their leader before the next General Election – up from 42% last summer

Ipsos’s latest Political Monitor, taken 19th to 25th January, shows public satisfaction with Boris Johnson as Prime Minister continuing to fall, with satisfaction levels now similar to some of his predecessors at their lowest point.

Leadership satisfaction – Johnson and past PMs

  • 24% are satisfied with the job Boris Johnson is doing as Prime Minister (down 4 points from December), 70% are dissatisfied (up 5 points). His net satisfaction rating now stands at -46. This is Mr Johnson’s lowest net rating yet. This is only marginally better than John Majors net rating at this point in his tenure as PM (-50, May 1993).
    • These results broadly match Mrs May’s lowest in her final months, with 69% dissatisfied, and 25% satisfied in June 2019 (net -44).
    • It is slightly worse than David Cameron’s worst score of 66% dissatisfied and 28% satisfied in July 2016 (net -34).
    • However, it is not as bad as John Major’s lowpoint of 76% dissatisfied and 17% satisfied in August 1994 (net -59), or Margaret Thatcher’s of 76% dissatisfied and 20% in March 1990 (net -56).
    • Boris Johnson’s current net rating is similar to Tony Blair’s lowest of -43 in January 2007 (68% dissatisfied and 25% dissatisfied) and -44 in July 2006 (23% satisfied and 67% dissatisfied).
    • Meanwhile, Gordon Brown typically registered similar scores to Boris Johnson on several occasions in 2008 and 2009.  MrBrown’s worst net score of -51 was in July 2008 (21% satisfied, 72% dissatisfied).

Leadership satisfaction – Keir Starmer and Ed Davey

  • Keir Starmer has seen his satisfaction rating rise five points to 33%, with 48% dissatisfied, down a point, giving him a net satisfaction rating of -15. The last Leader of the Opposition to win power was David Cameron, who recorded a -22 rating at a similar point in his tenure as opposition leader (September 2007), although this then significantly improved to -2 the following month and from then on.
    • Keir Starmer is gaining support among Labour supporters, with satisfaction up 11 points to 55%, and 34% dissatisfied, down six points, a net satisfaction rating of +21 (his best net rating with Labour supporters since last spring).
    • By way of comparison, the Prime Minister has seen his satisfaction rating among Conservative voters drop ten points in a month to 57%, with those dissatisfied up six points to 34% a net score of +23 (his worst yet as PM with Conservative voters).
  • Meanwhile, Liberal Democrat leader Ed Davey saw his satisfaction rating improve eight points to 27%, with dissatisfied down five points to 28%. But his challenge is still one of recognition, with 45% saying “don’t know”.
  • Two thirds of people (67%) are dissatisfied with the Government and 25% satisfied, little changed from December.

Change of leadership?

  • 61% of Britons think the Conservatives should change their leader before the next General Election (up from 42% last July), including 35% per cent of Conservative supporters.
  • 37% say Labour should get a new leader before the next General Election (was 34% last July), including 28% of Labour voters.  

Voting intention

Labour is on 40%, up one point from December, the Conservatives 31%, down three, the Liberal Democrats up two to 13%, and Greens also up two to 9%.

Gideon Skinner, Head of Politics at Ipsos, says of the findings:

The damage to Boris Johnson in public opinion continues as seven in ten Britons tell us they are unhappy with the job he is doing as Prime Minister – another month-on-month fall.
The Conservatives are falling behind Labour in the polls, while Keir Starmer’s ratings are creeping up, even if many are still to be convinced about him.
Six in ten now think the Conservatives should change their leader before the next election (including around half of Conservative 2019 voters), a big increase from happier times for them last summer and in line with views of Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour in 2019.
Governing parties have come back from similar poll deficits in the past, but in recent history this combination of factors is a new – and very uncomfortable – position for Boris Johnson and his Conservatives to find themselves in.

(Ipsos MORI)

27 January 2022

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-uk/7-10-britons-dissatisfied-boris-johnson-prime-minister

 

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By 48% To 38% Londoners Think Sadiq Khan Is Doing Badly As Mayor

Almost a year into Sadiq Khan's second term as Mayor of London, YouGov polling finds for the first time that Londoners tend think he's doing badly (48%) rather than well (38%) in the job. Our previous survey in late March/early April last year, prior to Khan’s re-election, had found Londoners split, with 45% saying he was doing well versus 42% who thought he was doing badly.

Looking at his current figures, in better news for the Mayor, Khan is retaining support amongst 2019 Labour voters, with 52% saying he's performing well compared to a third (33%) who say the opposite. This, however, is down from last year when almost two thirds (64%) of Labour voters thought he was doing well to 25% who thought badly.

On three key issues we asked about – all within the Mayor of London’s remit – Londoners also tend to think Khan is doing badly. Most capital residents believe Khan is handling crime (60%) and housing (56%) poorly, and by 49% to 40% they say the same of transport.

Perhaps more damaging for the Mayor is the fact 2019 Labour voters also tend to disapprove of his handling of housing and crime, by 49% to 30% in the case of the former and by 49% to 37% in the case of the latter. Labour-voting Londoners do still tend to think Khan is doing well on transport, however (52% vs 39%).

In further bad news for Labour, their leader in Westminster fares no better than their leader in City Hall. About as many Londoners think Keir Starmer is doing badly in his job (47%), while even fewer (33%) think he is doing well. Crucially, Starmer is retaining less support amongst 2019 Labour voters than Khan, with similar numbers saying they think the Labour leader is performing well as performing badly (42% to 41%).

When asked how Boris Johnson is doing as prime minister, just 21% think he's doing well. Over three times as many (71%) say the PM is performing badly in his role. Amongst 2019 Conservative voters in the capital, approval of the prime minister’s job performance stands at 52% well vs 43% badly. These figures, however, were collected prior to the party scandal this week so there's potentially some worse news on the horizon for Boris Johnson.

As for the capital's Metropolitan Police Commissioner, more than twice as many Londoners are disapproving of Cressida Dick (52%) than approving (22%).

(YouGov UK)

January 27, 2022

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/politics/articles-reports/2022/01/27/londoners-think-sadiq-khan-doing-badly-mayor

 

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Nine In Ten NHS Workers Say Their Workplace Has Seen Staff Shortages Due To COVID-19

As Boris Johnson and Sajid Javid press on with plans to roll back COVID-19 restrictions, the NHS remains amidst a staffing crisis. While the numbers of staff absent due to COVID-19 have begun to fall in recent days, around 35,000 members of NHS staff remain off work each day due to COVID-19. This compares to around 12,000 off as a result of the virus at the start of December 2021.

Now, a new YouGov survey of healthcare professionals reveals that 95% of NHS staff say their workplace has been affected by staff shortages due to COVID-19 recently. This includes nearly half (48%) who say their workplace has been affected to a “great” extent and 37% affected to a “moderate” extent. A mere 3% say they haven’t been affected by recent shortages. 

https://d25d2506sfb94s.cloudfront.net/cumulus_uploads/inlineimage/2022-02-02/nhs%20staff%20shortages.png

While the vast majority of staff working across all types of trust say they have been affected, those working in NHS hospitals are the most likely to say they have been ‘greatly’ impacted (55%). This compares to 37% of those in GP surgeries and health centres who say the same.

Despite shortages easing somewhat, it was only two weeks ago that members of the armed forces were deployed to assist London NHS trusts hard-hit by COVID-19. Some 48% of NHS workers in London report that their workplace has been “greatly” affected, however, this figure is highest among NHS workers in the North of England (55%).

How is the NHS coping with staff shortages?

Some 71% of NHS staff whose workplace has been affected by staff shortages say that current staff are working overtime or extra shifts to make up the missing hours. This figure rises to nearly four in five (79%) among nurses and midwives.

Additionally, 38% of staff say their workplace is bringing in agency staff to cope with shortages, and a similar amount (36%) say staff are being redeployed from nearby locations to assist.

Some 18% say recently retired staff have returned to work to help plug the gap. A further 9% say their workplace is using volunteers to fill posts. 

https://d25d2506sfb94s.cloudfront.net/cumulus_uploads/inlineimage/2022-02-02/nhs%20shortages%20coping.png

(YouGov UK)

February 02, 2022

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/health/articles-reports/2022/02/02/nine-ten-nhs-workers-say-their-workplace-has-seen-

 

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One In Ten Brits Are Interested In The NFL

Ahead of Super Bowl LVI, we take a look at the level of interest in the National Football League (NFL) in Britain and dig up some key insights into this audience base. YouGov Profiles data tells us that almost one in ten Brits (9%) are either somewhat interested in the NFL or say it’s one of their top interests.

Promisingly for the League, historical Profiles data reveals that the share of interested consumers has grown steadily since January 2020.

The age split of this fan-base largely mimics the make-up of the overall British population, but people aged 30-50 are somewhat more drawn to the league. Two in five (39%) of those interested in NFL belong to that age group, while they constitute 35% of the general population.

Another demographic insight is that almost three-quarters of NFL fans are men (73%), who make up only 48% of the total British adult population. This gender variance is somewhat less pronounced in the British fan bases of other popular American sports leagues, such as the National Basketball Association (67% male vs 33% female) and the MLB (68% male vs 32% female).

But how does the fan-following of other big-ticket American leagues compare against NFL on the whole? Our data shows that the NFL (9%) is noticeably more popular than the NBA (4%), MLB (4%) and NHL (4%), each of which draw interest from about one in 25 Brits.

Most popular NFL players in Britain

Seven-time title winner Tom Brady, who is mulling his future in the sport, is the most popular NFL athlete among NFL followers in Britain. About one in eight British NFL fans (12%) say he is one of their favourites.

Kansas City Chiefs’ Patrick Mahomes (9%) is second on the list and features in the top five alongside Ron Gronkowski (6%), Aaron Rodgers (6%) and Odell Beckham Jr. (5%).

How can advertisers reach these fans?

When compared to all sports followers (those who say they are “sports mad” or that they “follow sports closely”), NFL fans are significantly more likely to engage with billboard advertising. A quarter of them (26%) agree with the statement “I often comment on things I have seen on posters and billboards on social media” (vs 14% of general sports followers). A third of them (32%) say they “often talk to my friends and family about things they have seen advertised on posters or billboards” (vs 20% of sports followers).

NFL fans (33%) are also likelier than the average British sports follower (21%) to say they like to support their team by buying products from the team’s sponsors.

(YouGov UK)

February 02, 2022

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/sport/articles-reports/2022/02/02/one-ten-brits-are-interested-nfl

 

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Britons Lack Confidence In The Thoroughness, Independence And Likelihood Of Disciplinary Action From The Metropolitan Police Investigation Into Downing Street Parties

New research by Ipsos in the UK shows half or more of Britons are not very confident, if at all, that the investigation currently being carried out by the Metropolitan Police into the alleged breaking of Coronavirus restrictions in Downing Street will be thorough, independent or result in disciplinary action for any found to have broken the rules. Fieldwork was carried out online 28-29 January, before Monday's update was released.  Levels of confidence are lower than when Britons were asked about their expectations for the civil service (Sue Gray) inquiry (though note that fieldwork was carried out on 18 January).  

Will the police investigation into Downing Street parties be...?

Only 4 in 10 (41%) are confident that the police investigation will be thorough while half (52%) say they are not very confident or not at all confident. In comparison, 51% were confident the civil service inquiry would be thorough, 45% were not. Almost 6 in 10 (57%) are not convinced that the police investigation will be independent, only a third (35%) are more positive. When asked about the civil service inquiry 53% doubted it would be independent, 42% were confident it would be.

Almost two-thirds of Britons (65%) are not confident that this investigation will lead to disciplinary action against any individual(s) who are found to have broken the Coronavirus restrictions in place at the time of the party. Just over a quarter (27%) have faith that appropriate disciplinary action will be given as a result of the investigation. Britons were slightly more likely (although still not very much) to expect disciplinary action from the Sue Gray inquiry, 36% were confident this would be a result while 58% were not. 

Conservative 2019 voters tend to have more confidence than Labour voters, while women have less confidence than men that the results will be thorough (by 37% to 44%) or will lead to disciplinary action (by 24% to 31%).

Gideon Skinner, Head of Political Research at Ipsos in the UK, said:

"We have seen the impact that stories about parties breaking lockdown restrictions have had on public perceptions of the Prime Minister and the Government, but with the announcement that the Met Police is to open its own investigation there is not very much public confidence that this will meet their expectations to be independent, thorough and consequential either."

(Ipsos MORI)

3 February 2022

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-uk/britons-lack-confidence-thoroughness-independence-and-likelihood-disciplinary-action-metropolitan

 

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Wordle: Starter Words, Hard Mode And X/6 - How Are Britons Playing The Hit Game

The game of the moment is Wordle, a simple pastime that gives players six chances to guess a five-letter word, providing clues based on whether they have guessed any correct letters and whether they are in the right place.

Wordle has made news all over the English-speaking world after skyrocketing in popularity at the beginning of the year. The game began simply as a private amusement made by New York-based software developer Josh Wardle for his partner, before releasing to the public in October. The game has since been bought by the New York Times for $1.7m.

Now a new YouGov Direct poll has asked more than 1,000 Wordle players about how they play the game.

One in twelve Wordle players get their fix at midnight

The fact that you can only play Wordle once per day has some enthusiastic fans clicking on to the website at the stroke of midnight in order to get their latest fix, leading to at least one meme on the subject. Our survey shows that this midnight club constitutes 8% of British players. A further 29% get their daily Wordle game in before work at 9am, while another 25% will have made their guesses before noon.

One in three players claim to have achieved a 2/6, while four in ten have seen the dreaded X/6

There is apparently a 1 in 2,500 chance of making a correct guess on your first go, although guides for how to cheat at Wordle suggest that those who claim to have done so should be treated with suspicion.

Just 3% of our players claim to have reached the mythical 1/6 score, but one in three (31%) claim to have got it in two. The most common top score is 3/6, with 49% saying this is their best to date.

While many Wordle players have achieved relative greatness with their guesses, four in ten (43%) have suffered the humiliation of seeing their sixth guess rejected.

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Four in ten Wordle players use a starter word, with ADIEU being the most popular

In an attempt to give themselves the best odds, many players have concocted a ‘starter word’ that they always use as their first guess, generally consisting of as many vowels as possible but also common letters like R, S and/or T.

The results show that four in ten Wordle players (42%) are using a starter word, with ‘ADIEU’ being the most common, followed by ‘AUDIO’, ‘RAISE’, ‘STARE’ AND ‘TEARS’.

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Sharing Wordle is less widespread than you might think from your Twitter timeline

Key to Wordle’s success has been the way in which players can share their results on social media. The innovative use of emoji to represent performance without giving the word away has seen Twitter swamped with posts containing grey, yellow and green blocks.

The results show that 35% of British players have posted their Wordle score to social media platforms like Twitter and Facebook at least once, with 12% doing so most days or every day. Nevertheless, two thirds have managed to keep their social feeds clear of their scores.

People are more likely to share their scores with friends, family and colleagues in messages and group chats, but even then half (51%) are not imposing their scores on their fellow man. One in four (23%) always or most times spread the word to their nearest and dearest.

One Wordle a day isn't enough for a quarter of players

One of the aspects of Wordle that some claim make it so appealing is the fact that it only provides one game per day. Many outlets have suggested this to be a ‘calming feature’ that is needed in these pandemic times. Allowing only one game per day prevents people from gorging on the game and then discarding it, instead keeping them coming back for more the next day.

Nevertheless, a sizeable minority of players want the rationing to end. One in four (24%) say that they want Wordle to start giving more than one game per day. Most of the remaining three quarters (72%) are happy to keep the scarcity going, however.

A quarter of Wordle players are using 'hard mode' in one way or another

Unbeknownst to many, Wordle has a ‘hard mode’ option that only allows players to guess words that contain letters they’ve already discovered. A quarter of users play the game in hard mode, 7% who do so officially using the function on the website, and a further 18% who informally enforce the rule themselves.

Many British Wordle players look set to still be caught out by use of American English

Wordle’s 12 January solution ‘FAVOR’ caused outcry among British players, many of whom had not realized that the game was using American English rather than British English. The fact that the Wordle website uses a .co.uk domain adds insult to injury in this case. The nation’s grief was so strong that it even made the news in the USA.

That Wordle uses American English will be a nasty surprise to 24% of players, for whom this news seems to have passed them by, and potentially for the 27% who are unsure as well.

Double letters bug a third of players

Wordle offers no indication that a word contains duplicate letters, to the dismay of many players on 13 January upon discovery of the double-b in ‘ABBEY’. Some have complained that there should be some sort of indication that a word is using a letter twice or more, a move which 29% of players want to see introduced. Some 6% would go further still, saying that Wordle shouldn’t use words that contain duplicate letters at all. Most (57%), however, are happy to keep the current rules.

(YouGov UK)

February 03, 2022

Source: https://yougov.co.uk/topics/entertainment/articles-reports/2022/02/03/wordle-starter-words-hard-mode-and-x6-how-are-brit

 

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Only 1 In 5 Think Boris Johnson Is Handling The Situation Between Russia And Ukraine Well, But Few Think Keir Starmer Would Do A Better Job

As talks continue to try and stop Russia invading Ukraine, new research by Ipsos shows 1 in 5 Britons think Boris Johnson has done a good job of handling the ongoing situation (19%) while 2 in 5 (41%) think he’s done a bad job. 

In comparison, a quarter (23%) say the UK Government has so far handled the situation well while a third (33%) say they have done a bad job. Thinking about how well President Job Biden has responded, 19% think he has done a good job while 3 in 10 (29%) disagree. 

Despite an overall negative view of Boris Johnson’s response to the situation in Ukraine, few believe the leader of the opposition would do a better job. One in 5 (22%) say Keir Starmer would do a better job than the current PM in responding to the situation between Ukraine and Russia, the same proportion say Boris Johnson would so a better job than the leader of the opposition. Among their own supporters, Boris Johnson receives more support. Half of 2019 Conservative voters say Johnson would do a better job while 42% of Labour voters say Starmer would do better. 

Who would do a better job responding to Ukraine?

Considering what actions Britain should take should Russia invade Ukraine, Britons are most in favour of diplomatic and economic sanctions (40%) while around a third (36%) support humanitarian interventions, such as supporting any Ukrainian refugees. Less than 1 in 5 (17%) would be in favour of military intervention while 21% say Britain should not intervene at all. 

Support for future interventions by Britain in Ukraine

When thinking about the role played by the British military around the world, a third (33%) of Britons say the British Armed Forces should intervene abroad only when British interests are directly threatened. A similar proportion (30%) say intervention should only take place when other people’s rights and freedoms are threatened. One in 5 (22%) say British Armed Forces should not intervene abroad and only be used to defend British territory. 

Keiran Pedley, Research Director at Ipsos in the UK, says:

The public are twice as likely to think Prime Minister Boris Johnson is doing a bad job handling the situation in the Ukraine rather than a good one, which reflects his deteriorating poll ratings of late. However, when asked to choose who would handle the situation better, roughly equal numbers choose Starmer and Johnson, with more than half saying neither or don’t know. in terms of the government’s response, there is support for diplomatic and humanitarian efforts but little appetite for a potential military confrontation with Russia. Some one in five think Britain should not intervene at all.

(Ipsos MORI)

4 February 2022

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-uk/only-1-5-think-boris-johnson-handling-situation-between-russia-and-ukraine-well-few-think-keir

 

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53% Of French People Say That The Prices They Have Paid In Recent Weeks Generally Seem Higher Than They Were Six Months Ago

  • 53% of French people say that the prices they have paid in recent weeks generally seem higher than they were six months ago (global average: 59%)
  • The expenditure items that have increased the most according to the French are:
    • Transport ( 72 %)
    • Expenses ( 71 %)
    • Food ( 66 %)
  • 4 out of 10 French people expect an increase in their spending in the next three months

Inflation: The French feel the bill passing

While the Ipsos Obs'COP 2021** study published last fall revealed that the question of the cost of living is now at the top of French people's concerns (57%, +7pts compared to 2020), Ipsos unveils a new study on the perception of inflation in 30 countries around the world, including France. A majority of consumers around the world (59%) say the prices they have paid in recent weeks generally feel higher than they did six months ago. A statement shared by 53% of French people, particularly among 50-74 year olds (57%), and annual incomes between €18,001 and €36,000 (56%).  

Note that globally: the 12 countries surveyed where prices are most widely perceived to have increased include six Latin American countries, four Central and Eastern European countries, Turkey and South Africa . In contrast, Japan and China are the countries where consumers are least likely to say that the prices they have recently paid are higher.

 

Transport, charges, food: the three expenditure items that have increased the most according to the French

Which expenditure items have increased the most according to the French? Unsurprisingly, transport (petrol, car payment and maintenance, parking, public transport, etc.) comes first for 72% of respondents, closely followed by charges including electricity, gas, water, telephone, internet (71% ), and food / drinks (66%). A perception in tune with the reality of consumer prices , whether for gasoline, energy or even food – as seen recently with the price of baguettes.

"Some French people realize that the increases were neither media fiction nor reserved for others, are destabilized because they had not anticipated them and did not imagine having to change their habits or their "lifestyle", overestimating in particular their arbitrable purchasing power. They may feel downgraded and frustrated because there is no pleasure associated with the constrained expenses, most of which are operating costs to access services (telephony, streaming, etc.) and represent charges without immediate benefit, which can arouse resentment and exasperation. »

Yves Bardon,

Flair Program Director, Ipsos Knowledge Center.

Concerning the other items of expenditure, the French are in the minority to perceive a significant change in prices  : they are 46% to observe an increase in the price of clothing over the last 6 months (versus 55% of the world population), 38% to find the price of their higher housing (against 51% on average on a global scale, ie 13 points less), the same goes for the price of health services – where 73% of Argentines, for example, perceive a rise in prices in this sector. Finally, 43% of French people have also observed an increase in prices in the entertainment sector , a figure again lower than the overall feeling (49%).

 

4 out of 10 French people expect their spending to increase in the next 3 months

And things are not about to change according to the French: 40% of them expect their total household expenses to increase over the next three months (“a lot” for 14% , “a little” for 26%) while 44% say that they will not change and 16% that they will decrease. A fear particularly shared by those under 35 (42%), and average incomes (44%).

 

“Inflation-induced price increases have a real impact on the election period. They reduce the purchasing power of the vast majority and reveal a new category of "surprised" French people, who find themselves more vulnerable than they imagined in the face of rising prices and who join those whose power to purchase was already fragile. 

This context can fuel frustrations and tensions if voters feel that candidates remain on their ideological positions and principles and are disconnected from their day-to-day economic realities.

concludes Yves Bardon .

(Ipsos France)

January 24, 2022

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/fr-fr/les-francais-et-linflation-comment-la-percoivent-ils

 

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The French Are Pessimistic About The Benefits Of Artificial Intelligence

Figures and key lessons from the study:

  • 50% of the French understand what AI is (64% overall)
  • The French are only 34% to trust companies using AI (50% overall)
  • A minority of French people (31%) think that products and services using AI have more benefits than disadvantages (52% overall)
  • 39% of French people believe that artificial intelligence has already simplified their lives, ie 21 points less than the average of the other paid respondents.
  • A third of French people (32%) say they are concerned about AI, slightly less than the world average (39%)
  • Security is the first area in which the French expect to see changes induced by AI
  • The French believe that AI can bring future improvements in the sectors of transport (69%), education and learning (63%), security (61%), or even the home (57 %)
     

AI and the French: between ignorance and disbelief

Ipsos questioned the French alongside 27 citizens of the world on the confidence they can have in artificial intelligence. Two-thirds of people around the world say they have a good understanding of it (64%), but only half (50%) say they are familiar with services and products that use AI. The French are only 50% to understand what AI is (-14 pts compared to the global), and few (34%) have more confidence in companies using AI (-16 pts compared to the world average). One of the main reasons cited: lack of knowledge of products or services that require artificial intelligence (only 34% of French people say they know them, compared to 50% overall).

It should be noted that geographical disparities are strong: the proportion of inhabitants who believe they have a good knowledge of AI varies from 41% in Japan to 75% in Russia, and those who say they know products and services related to AI from 32 % in Japan to 76% in China. Overall, trust in AI seems to be correlated with countries' understanding of it: economically less developed countries are both the most confident and those who think they understand best what it is.

 

“The French are only 39% to consider that products and services using AI make life easier, the lowest score among the 27 countries against at the top 87% in China. This discrepancy testifies to the lack of familiarity with AI applications in France and how much the Chinese already live with AI”

Henry Wallard ,

Deputy Chief Executive Officer of the Ipsos Group.

 

Can AI improve the daily lives of French people?

If the French are less aware of what artificial intelligence is compared to their neighbors, this directly impacts the way in which they perceive its interest in their daily life. 45% of French people think that products and services related to AI will profoundly change their daily lives in the next 3 to 5 years (compared to 60% overall) and only 32% think that this has already changed something (vs. 49% for the world average). Note that it would have "simplified life" for 39% of French people, ie 21 points less than the average of the other countries questioned.

In total, a third of French people (31%) think that products and services using artificial intelligence have more benefits than disadvantages, making France the least enthusiastic country on this point (52% overall) . Almost 1 in 3 French people even say they are “concerned” about AI (32%).

Asked about the areas in which they think they will see changes brought about by AI in the years to come, the French cite security first (30%) . One French person out of four (25%) then thinks that it will have an impact almost as important on the cost of living. A smaller share (15%) also mentions changes in education, environment, family or rights.

But will AI have a positive or negative impact on the lives of French people? As for the positive effects of AI, the French see possible improvements thanks to it in the transport sectors (69%) as a priority. Next come education and learning (63%), safety (61%), the home (57%) and the environment (41%). The French are much more reserved about the improvements it could bring to employment or the environment (41%), or even the cost of living (34%) and rights and freedoms (28%) .

(Ipsos France)

January 26, 2022

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/fr-fr/les-francais-pessimistes-sur-les-benefices-de-lintelligence-artificielle

 

NORTH AMERICA

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 A Majority Of U S Adults (61%) Are Optimistic That The New Year Will Be Better Than The Year That Just Ended

Facing successive waves of the coronavirus and an uncertain economy, the public enters 2022 largely dissatisfied about the way things are going in the United States and fearful about the state of the nation.

A line graph showing that as 2022 begins, there are low levels of national satisfaction among both parties

However, a majority of U.S. adults (61%) are optimistic that the new year will be better than the year that just ended, according to a new survey from Pew Research Center.

Public satisfaction with national conditions remains low. Just 21% say they are satisfied with the way things are going in the country, while 78% are dissatisfied. The share expressing satisfaction with the state of the nation is down slightly since September (26%) and down 12 percentage points since last March (from 33%). The new survey also finds that the public’s views of the national economy remain mostly negative and that majorities continue to view the coronavirus as a major threat to the economy and public health.

Today, only small shares of both Democrats and Republicans (and those who lean to each party) say they are satisfied with the way things are going – though Democrats are nearly three times as likely as Republicans to have a positive view (29% vs. 10%).

For most of Donald Trump’s presidency, majorities of Republicans were satisfied with national conditions, compared with fewer than a quarter of Democrats. But by the summer of 2020, amid the spread of the coronavirus and criminal justice protests, members of both parties were largely negative toward national conditions.

A chart showing that a majority of U.S. adults say they are ‘fearful’ about the state of the country

Today, Democrats are far less satisfied with the way things are going than they were last March (47% then vs. 29% today). Republicans’ already-low level of satisfaction also declined from 17% to 10%.

Americans continue to express negative rather than positive emotions when thinking about national conditions these days.

Majorities say they feel “fearful” (62%) and “angry” (55%) when thinking about the state of the country. Fewer than half feel “hopeful,” while just 20% say they feel “proud.” These views are largely unchanged since November 2020, shortly after the presidential election, though the share of adults who say they feel hopeful has declined (54% then vs. 46% today).

Nearly identical majorities in both parties say they feel fearful about the state of the country, though Republicans are more likely than Democrats to say they feel angry, and much less likely to say they feel hopeful.

While Americans are dissatisfied with current national conditions, a 61% majority say they expect 2022 will be better than 2021. About four-in-ten say they expect that 2022 will be worse.

A bar chart showing that a majority of Americans say they expect 2022 to be better than 2021

Democrats are considerably more likely than Republicans to say the coming year will be better (71% vs. 46%, respectively), though optimism among this group has declined slightly since last year.

In January 2020, when Trump was still in office, the reverse was true. Republicans were far more likely to express optimism about the coming year than Democrats (78% vs. 36%).

(PEW)

JANUARY 25, 2022

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2022/01/25/americans-broadly-negative-about-the-state-of-the-nation-but-most-see-a-better-year-ahead/

 

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Republicans And Democrats Alike View Russia More As A Competitor Than An Enemy Of The U S

Amid tensions between the United States and Russia over a possible military invasion of Ukraine, Republicans and Democrats are largely in agreement about the threats posed by Russia, according to a new survey by Pew Research Center. The survey was conducted Jan. 10-17, prior to the U.S. putting troops on higher alert and NATO announcing that member countries would be sending military support to the region.

A bar chart showing that there are no significant partisan differences in views of Russia and its military buildup near the Russia-Ukraine border

Overall, 49% of U.S. adults consider Russia a competitor of the U.S., while 41% say it is an enemy. Only 7% consider Russia a partner of the U.S.  

Republicans and Democrats have similar views of Russia’s relationship to the U.S.: Half of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents regard Russia as a competitor to the U.S., while 39% say it is an enemy. Among Democrats and Democratic leaners, 49% view Russia as a competitor, while 43% see it as an enemy. Small shares in both parties (9% of Republicans, 6% of Democrats) say Russia is a partner of the U.S.

The survey also finds that about a quarter of Americans (26%) consider the Russian military buildup near Ukraine to be a major threat to U.S. interests, while 33% say it is a minor threat to U.S. interests. Another 7% say it is no threat at all. A relatively large share (33%) say they are not sure how Russian actions toward Ukraine affect U.S. interests.

Views of Russia’s military buildup near Ukraine also do not differ much by partisan affiliation. Similar shares of Republicans and Democrats consider it a major threat (27% vs. 26%) or minor threat (36% vs. 33%) to U.S. interests. Democrats (34%) are slightly more likely than Republicans (28%) to say they are unsure how Russia’s military buildup will affect U.S. interests.

Public attention to the Russia-Ukraine tensions has, thus far, been fairly limited. In the mid-January survey, 23% say they have heard a lot about Russia’s military buildup, while 45% have heard a little and nearly a third (32%) say they have heard nothing at all.

A bar chart showing that those who have heard ‘a lot’ about Ukraine crisis are more likely to view it as major threat to U.S. interests

Nearly half (49%) of those who have heard a lot about the border tensions say Russia’s military buildup is a major threat to U.S. interests, compared with 26% of those who have heard a little and just 9% who have heard nothing.

Young adults and those who do not have a college degree are less likely to have heard a lot about the crisis – and are more likely to say they are not sure if Russia’s military buildup is a threat to U.S. interests.

Americans who have heard at least a little about Russia’s increased military presence along its border with Ukraine also are more likely to consider Russia an enemy of the U.S.

A bar chart showing that about half of those who have heard a lot about Russia’s military buildup view it as an enemy of U.S.

About half of American adults who have heard a lot about Russia’s military buildup along the Ukrainian border consider Russia an enemy of the U.S. (53%), compared with smaller shares of those who have heard a little (42%) or nothing at all (30%) about Russia’s actions.

(PEW)

JANUARY 26, 2022

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2022/01/26/republicans-and-democrats-alike-view-russia-more-as-a-competitor-than-an-enemy-of-the-u-s/

 

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In U S, Women More Likely Than Men To Report Feeling Empathy For Those Suffering

Research has suggested that the COVID-19 pandemic has had greater impacts on women in the economy and the home. In this period of turmoil, women also may be carrying a heavier emotional burden than men, according to a Pew Research Center survey.

A bar chart showing that U.S. women are more likely than men to have recently thought about the 'big questions in life'

The Center recently asked Americans about their thoughts and feelings regarding human suffering in light of the pandemic and other recent tragedies, finding that women and men answered a few questions somewhat differently.

Two-thirds of women (66%) say that in the past year, they have personally thought “a lot” or “some” about big questions such as the meaning of life, whether there is any purpose to suffering and why terrible things happen to people, compared with 55% of men who report the same.

A bar chart showing that women in the U.S. are more likely than men to say they often feel sad when hearing about other people suffering

When seeing or hearing about terrible things happening to people, women are much more likely than men (71% vs. 53%) to say they often feel sad for those who are suffering. Similarly, a larger share of women (46%) than men (34%) report often feeling the desire to help those suffering. And when hearing about bad news, women are more inclined than men to say they often feel thankful for the good things in their own lives (76% vs. 67%).

While women are more inclined than men to report having these feelings often, overwhelming majorities of men do say they experience these things at least “sometimes.”

A bar chart showing that women are more likely than men in the U.S. to say the news is 'just too much to take'

In response to terrible news, women also mention feeling news fatigue more frequently than men. Around a quarter of women (27%), compared with a smaller share of men (20%), often feel the need to tune out the news because it’s just too much to take. And 79% of women – versus 64% of men – say they at least sometimes feel this way. The Center found a gender gap in the same direction on a similar question about news fatigue in 2019.

Upon learning of recent tragedies, women are also somewhat more likely than men to say they often or sometimes feel worried that something similar will happen to them (62% vs. 55%). Meanwhile, men are slightly more inclined than women to confess they often or sometimes have feelings of schadenfreude – feeling happy “if the person [who is suffering] seems to have deserved it” (37% vs. 31%).

Does all this mean that women innately feel more empathy than men? Some research points in that direction, but other scientists urge caution in attributing gender differences to biology.

Gender gaps in belief in the afterlife, supernatural

The survey also finds that women are much more likely than men to believe in an afterlife and supernatural forces.

A chart showing that women are more likely than men to believe in heaven, that everything happens for a reason

Three-quarters of women, for instance, believe that everything in life happens for a reason, compared with six-in-ten men. Similarly, women are much more likely than men (51% vs. 35%) to believe in fate – that is, that the course of their lives is predetermined.

Meanwhile, nearly eight-in-ten women in the U.S. (78%) say they believe in heaven, a full 10 percentage points higher than the share among men. And women are more likely to express belief in reincarnation as well (38% vs. 27%).

These findings reflect the fact that in general, women are more religious than men by a variety of measures. For example, among U.S. adults, women are substantially more likely than men to consider religion very important in their lives.

(PEW)

JANUARY 28, 2022

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2022/01/28/in-u-s-women-more-likely-than-men-to-report-feeling-empathy-for-those-suffering/

 

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More Adults Approve(46%) Than Disapprove (22%) Of U S Diplomatic Boycott Of Olympics; Few Have Heard Much About It

As the 2022 Winter Olympics begin later this week in China, more Americans say they approve (46%) than disapprove (22%) of the U.S. diplomatic boycott of the Games, while 31% are unsure. The diplomatic boycott, announced by the Biden administration in December to protest Chinese human rights abuses, has captured little public attention; about nine-in-ten U.S. adults (91%) say they have heard little (46%) or nothing at all (45%) about it, according to a Pew Research Center survey conducted Jan. 10-17.

A chart showing that few Americans have heard ‘a lot’ about U.S. diplomatic boycott of Winter Olympics; more approve than disapprove of boycott

The public’s views of China’s relations with the U.S. have changed very little in the past year. Currently, 54% view China as a competitor of the U.S., while 35% consider it an enemy. Just 9% say China is a partner of the United States.

Under a diplomatic boycott, U.S. athletes can compete in the Winter Games, but U.S. government officials or representatives will not attend. While some other countries – including the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada and Denmark – are also diplomatically boycotting these Games, most countries are not. The last (and only prior) time the U.S. took such an action was the full boycott of the Moscow Summer Olympics in 1980, to protest the Soviet Union’s invasion of Afghanistan. The USSR retaliated four years later, barring its athletes from participating in the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles.

A bar chart showing that there is wide support for the U.S. diplomatic boycott of Winter Olympics among those who have heard about it

The small share of adults who have heard a lot about the diplomatic boycott (9%) largely support the decision: 69% approve of the boycott, including 47% who strongly approve of it. A majority of those who have heard a little about it also approve of the boycott (62%), though just 27% strongly approve. Only about half of those who have heard nothing about the boycott offer an opinion.

Republicans and Democrats have similar views of the U.S. decision to forego diplomatic representation at the Winter Games. Half of Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents approve of the decision, as do 45% of Republicans and GOP leaners.

A slightly larger share of Republicans and Republican leaners (26%) disapprove of the U.S. diplomatic boycott compared with Democrats and Democratic leaners (19%). About a third of both Republicans and Democrats are not sure whether they approve of the boycott or not.

Evaluations of U.S. relationship with China

Americans’ views of China have grown much more negative in recent years, according to a survey conducted last year by Pew Research Center.

A bar chart showing that conservative Republicans are far more likely than others to view China as an enemy of the United States

However, the public continues to view China more as a competitor than as an enemy of the U.S. Unlike opinions about the diplomatic boycott of the Winter Olympics, these attitudes are deeply divided along partisan and ideological lines.

About half of Republicans (52%) – including 62% of conservative Republicans – consider China an enemy of the U.S. Among Democrats, just 22% say China is an enemy of the U.S. while about three times as many (67%) say it is a competitor. There are no significant ideological differences among Democrats.

(PEW)

JANUARY 31, 2022

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2022/01/31/more-adults-approve-than-disapprove-of-u-s-diplomatic-boycott-of-olympics-few-have-heard-much-about-it/

 

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Public’s Views Of Supreme Court Turned More Negative Before News Of Breyer’s Retirement

The U.S. Supreme Court, which typically attracts only modest attention from the American public, is about to occupy the national spotlight with the possibility of a history-making change among the court’s justices and a series of highly anticipated rulings on matters ranging from abortion to gun policy.

Chart shows favorable ratings of Supreme Court have declined sharply in past year

The court enters this pivotal period with its public image as negative as it has been in many years, as Democrats – especially liberal Democrats – increasingly express unfavorable opinions of the court.

In a national survey by Pew Research Center, 54% of U.S. adults say they have a favorable opinion of the Supreme Court while 44% have an unfavorable view. The survey was conducted before Justice Stephen Breyer announced his retirement from the court and President Joe Biden reiterated his pledge to nominate the first Black woman to the Supreme Court to replace Breyer.

Over the past three years, the share of adults with a favorable view of the court has declined 15 percentage points, according to the new survey, conducted Jan. 10-17 among 5,128 adults on the Center’s American Trends Panel. Looking back further, current views of the court are among the least positive in surveys dating back nearly four decades.

The recent decline in favorability is due in large part to a sharp drop-off among Democrats. Last year, about two-thirds of Democrats said they had a favorable view of the court. Today, that number has fallen to 46%; among liberal Democrats and Democratic leaners, just 36% view the court positively, down from 57%. Favorable views among Republicans have also dipped over the past few years, though are largely unchanged since 2021: Roughly two-thirds continue to hold positive opinions of the court.

Among the other findings from the new survey:

Changing views of the court’s ideology. The share of adults saying the Supreme Court is conservative has increased since 2020, from 30% to 38%. Still, more say the court is “middle of the road” (48%), while 9% say it is liberal. A majority of Democrats (57%) say the court is conservative, compared with 18% of Republicans.

Majority says Supreme Court has the right amount of power. Nearly six-in-ten (58%) say the court has the right amount of power, but that has slipped since 2020 (from 65%) as more Americans – Democrats, in particular – say it has too much power.

Broad skepticism that justices are not influenced by politics. Among the overwhelming majority of adults (84%) who say Supreme Court justices should not bring their own political views into the cases they decide, just 16% say they do an excellent or good job in keeping their views out of their decisions. However, both Republicans and Democrats are much more likely to say justices nominated by presidents of their own party achieve this than do justices nominated by presidents from the other party.

Narrow majority of Democrats now view Supreme Court unfavorably

Over the past year, there has been a sharp decline in the share of Democrats and Democratic leaners who hold favorable views of the Supreme Court. In early 2021, roughly two-thirds (65%) said they had a favorable opinion of the court. Today, that has declined 19 percentage points, and Democrats are now more likely to have an unfavorable (53%) than a favorable (46%) view of the court.

Chart shows favorable views of Supreme Court decline sharply among Democrats; only about a third of liberal Democrats now view the court favorably

There has been a similar-sized drop among conservative and moderate Democrats (19 points) and liberal Democrats (21 points). But while moderate and conservative Democrats are about as likely to hold favorable as they are unfavorable views of the court (53% vs. 46%, respectively), a clear majority of liberal Democrats give the Supreme Court negative ratings (62% favorable vs. 36% unfavorable).

Since last year, Republicans’ views of the court have remained more steady. In 2021, 67% of Republicans said they have a favorable opinion of the court. Today, 65% say this. Over six-in-ten conservative Republicans and moderate and liberal Republicans continue to hold positive views.

Changing views of Supreme Court’s ideology, power

Chart shows larger shares of adults, particularly Democrats, view Supreme Court as conservative

The public is now seeing a more ideologically conservative court than it did two years ago. In August 2020 – prior to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death and the subsequent appointment of Amy Coney Barrett – three-in-ten adults said the court was ideologically conservative. Today, 38% of adults say the court is conservative – an 8-point increase.

Democrats’ perceptions of the court’s ideology have also shifted considerably. In 2020, 47% of Democrats and Democratic leaners said the court was conservative, with an identical share saying it was middle of the road. Today, a majority of Democrats (57%) say the court is conservative – a 10-point shift.

Among Republicans, there has been a 6-point shift. Today, 18% say it is conservative, compared with 12% in 2020. Smaller shares now say the court is either middle of the road or liberal.

In the current survey, a majority of Republicans and Republican-leaning independents – regardless of their ideology – say that the court is middle of the road. Conservative Republicans are about twice as likely as moderate and liberal Republicans, however, to say the court is liberal (21% vs. 10%).

Chart shows majority who have heard a lot about recent cases view Supreme Court as conservative

Ideological differences are much wider among Democrats and Democratic leaners. A sizable majority of liberal Democrats say the court is conservative (74%), compared with just 44% of conservative and moderate Democrats. Among this group, about half (49%) say the court is middle of the road.

Adults who have been more attentive to recent cases being heard by the court are also more likely to say the court is conservative. About two-thirds of those who have heard a lot about recent cases say the court’s ideology is conservative, compared with a smaller share of those who have heard a little (44%). Among those who have heard nothing at all, a large majority say the court is middle of the road (60%).

This pattern in attentiveness holds for both parties, though it is particularly pronounced among Democrats. For example, a large majority of Democrats who have read or heard a lot about recent cases being heard by the Supreme Court say that the court is conservative (85%). This compares with 66% of those who have heard a little about these cases, and just 31% who have heard nothing at all.

While there have been increases in the shares of Republicans and Democrats who see a conservative shift on the Supreme Court, partisans have moved in opposite directions when it comes to views of the court’s power.

Today, 58% of adults overall say the Supreme Court has the right amount of power – smaller than the share who said this in August 2020. Larger shares of adults now say the court has too much power (25% then vs. 30% today) or too little power (8% then vs. 11% today).

Chart shows growing share of Democrats say Supreme Court has too much power

But Republicans and Democrats have diverged in views about the power of the Supreme Court.

Republicans have become less likely to say the court has too much power – and more likely to say the court has either the right amount or too little power. In 2020, about three-in-ten Republicans said the court had too much power; today, 18% say this.

Democrats have moved in the opposite direction. In August 2020, prior to Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death, 23% said the court had too much power; today, that share has nearly doubled (40%).

Partisans agree Supreme Court justices should not be influenced by politics, but differ over which justices do this

A large majority of adults – regardless of their partisanship or ideology – say that Supreme Court justices should not bring their own political views into how they decide major cases. But there is more skepticism on whether justices are living up to this ideal – and partisans are more likely to give justices nominated by a president of their own party positive assessments than justices nominated by the opposing party’s president.

Chart shows partisans more likely to rate justices nominated by presidents from their own party as free from politics

Among the large majority of adults (84%) who say that Supreme Court justices should not bring their own political views into how they decide cases, just 16% say the justices are doing an excellent or good job in doing so. A majority (57%) say they do only fair or poor, while 26% are not sure.

Though neither Republicans nor Democrats say that justices are doing a good job at keeping their political views out of cases, Republicans are twice as likely as Democrats to say justices are doing a good job remaining politically neutral (24% vs. 12%).

However, Republicans and Democrats are much more likely to say that justices nominated by their own party’s presidents are doing a better job at keeping their political views out of decisions than justices nominated by the opposing party.

For example, among Republicans and Republican leaners who say justices should not bring their own political views into how they decide cases, 45% say that justices nominated by Republican presidents are doing at least a good job in keeping their political views out of decisions. Just 12% of this group say this about justices nominated by Democratic presidents.

There is a similar pattern among Democrats and Democratic leaners who want justices to keep their political views out of their decisions: 44% say justices nominated by Democratic presidents are doing at least a good job at being politically neutral – but just 12% say this about justices nominated by Republican presidents.

(PEW)

FEBRUARY 2, 2022

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/politics/2022/02/02/publics-views-of-supreme-court-turned-more-negative-before-news-of-breyers-retirement/

 

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Black Women Account For A Small Fraction (2%) Of The Federal Judges Who Have Served To Date

President Joe Biden has pledged to nominate a Black woman to the Supreme Court seat being vacated by Justice Stephen Breyer, who is retiring from the court after nearly 28 years. If confirmed by the Senate, Biden’s nominee would become the first Black woman ever to serve on the nation’s highest court and one of a relatively small number to serve as a federal judge at any level.

Only 70 of the 3,843 people who have ever served as federal judges in the United States – fewer than 2% – have been Black women, according to a biographical database maintained by the Federal Judicial Center, the research and education arm of the federal judiciary. That figure includes single-race, multiracial and Hispanic or Afro-Latina Black women who have served on federal courts governed by Article III of the U.S. Constitution, including the Supreme Court, 13 appeals courts and 91 district courts. It excludes appointees to non-Article III territorial courts in Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands and the Virgin Islands.

The first Black woman ever to serve on the federal bench was Constance Baker Motley, who was nominated by President Lyndon Johnson and took her seat on the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York in 1966. Motley was the district’s chief judge from 1982 to 1986 and died in 2005.

The number of Black women appointed to the federal judiciary has grown over time, especially during Democratic administrations. In fact, after little more than a year in office, Biden has already appointed more Black women to federal judgeships (11) than all but two presidents did during their entire tenures. Democrats Barack Obama and Bill Clinton, who each served eight years in the White House, appointed 26 and 15 Black women to the federal judiciary, respectively.

A bar chart showing that Biden has already appointed more Black women to the federal bench than any GOP president

Among Republican presidents, George W. Bush appointed eight Black women during his eight-year tenure. George H.W. Bush and Donald Trump each appointed two during their four years in office, while Ronald Reagan appointed one Black woman in eight years. As previous Pew Research Center analyses have found, Republican presidents have generally been less likely than Democratic presidents to appoint federal judges who are women or racial and ethnic minorities.

Biden also stands out when looking at the percentage of each president’s appointed judges who have been Black women. As of Feb. 1, Black women have accounted for around a quarter (24%) of Biden’s appointed judges – far higher than the percentages for any other president, including Obama (8%) and Clinton (4%).

Historically, women have accounted for a relatively small share of all Black federal judges. Fewer than a third of all Black judges ever appointed (29%, or 70 of 239) have been women.

Most of the Black women who have served as federal judges to date have done so at the district court level. Only 13 have served at the appellate court level – that is, the powerful regional courts that are one step below the Supreme Court.

If Biden’s nominee joins the Supreme Court, she would be its third-ever Black justice (after Thurgood Marshall and Clarence Thomas) and its sixth-ever woman (after Sandra Day O’Connor, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Sonia Sotomayor, Elena Kagan and Amy Coney Barrett). Overall, 115 justices have served on the Supreme Court.

(PEW)

FEBRUARY 2, 2022

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2022/02/02/black-women-account-for-a-small-fraction-of-the-federal-judges-who-have-served-to-date/

 

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Debate On Gains And Losses Of Remote Education During COVID 19. Is Hybrid Model For Children? The Best Views From USA

One of the unfortunate consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic was that it forced many children to learn from home. It is now well-documented that remote learning resulted in substantial learning loss. The slowdown in academic progress was especially pronounced among Black students, Latino students and those from low-income households.

Yet, evidence from a 2020 NewSchools Venture Fund/Gallup study suggests that the quality of digital learning tools (websites, apps, online tutorials, online games and videos, or programs used to teach and support student learning and schoolwork) may have blunted the negative impact of remote schooling. Better student outcomes -- including ease of learning from home, confidence in schools' ability to provide high-quality education, and expectations for learning progress -- are strongly associated with the quality of digital learning tools, as reported by teachers, parents and students.

These results are based on web surveys conducted in July and August 2020, with 1,111 teachers, 2,345 parents and 1,088 students in grades three through 12. Student and parent responses were excluded if parents stated that their child did no distance learning in the spring of 2020 (less than 1% of the sample).

The findings indicate that universal access to digital learning tools will probably not generate gains for students nor equitable opportunities across groups of students unless the tools themselves are of high quality.

About one in five teachers, parents and students rated their digital learning tools as "excellent," less than the proportion who rated them as "fair" or "poor." The preponderant response -- comprising roughly half of answers -- was that digital learning tools were "good." There was remarkable consistency across teachers, parents and students in providing these ratings.

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Custom graphic. About one in five teachers (21%), parents (20%) and students (20%) rated their digital learning tools in the spring of 2020 as excellent, less than the proportion who rated them as fair or poor.

Teachers working in schools with a higher percentage of children from low-income households were less likely to rate digital learning tools as "excellent" or "good" than were teachers serving high-income students. In general, schools with a higher percentage of children from low-income families had lower-quality digital learning tools, according to their teachers.1 When comparing teachers at schools with less than 25% of students meeting eligibility criteria for reduced-price lunch to those with at least 75%, the gap in digital learning quality (using the share reporting "excellent" or "good") was 10.9 percentage points in favor of students from high-income households. This suggests that students in low-income schools had less access to the most useful digital tools.

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Custom graphic. Teachers working in schools with a higher percentage of children from low-income households, at 67.4%, were less likely to rate digital learning tools used in the spring of 2020 as excellent or good than were teachers serving high-income students, at 78.3%.

Across teachers, parents and students, the quality of digital learning tools is strongly associated with several indicators of learning outcomes. These indicators measure the reported ease of learning from home, confidence in schools' ability to provide high-quality education, and expectations for learning progress in the subsequent semester.

When asked whether students found learning from home easy or hard compared with learning at school, teachers, parents and students who reported having high-quality learning technology were all more likely than those without that digital advantage to consider remote learning "easy" or "very easy." For instance, teachers who rated their digital learning tools as "excellent" were 32 percentage points more likely to say remote learning was easy or very easy, compared with teachers who rated their digital learning tools as "poor." The gaps in ease of learning reported by parents and students were 45 points and 13 points, respectively.

When asked about the upcoming fall semester of 2020, each group also expressed greater confidence in their school's ability to provide high-quality education when they reported having high-quality learning technology. To illustrate, we looked at the percentages of respondents who expressed high confidence in their school's ability (a "4" or "5" on a five-point scale) among two groups: those who gave digital learning tools an "excellent" rating and those who gave them a "poor" rating. Confidence in school ability was 31 percentage points higher among teachers who rated digital tools as "excellent" compared with those rating them "poor." The effect was even stronger for parents (38 points) and stronger still for students (44 points). Thus, across all groups, optimism about their school's ability to provide high-quality education was much higher when digital learning tools were perceived as high-quality.

Likewise, when asked whether students would learn more, the same or less than in a typical fall semester, each group was much more likely to expect learning gains to be on par with the standards or even above them when they rated digital learning tools as "excellent" compared with "poor." In this case, the gaps for teachers, parents and students were similar, at 28, 30 and 34 points, respectively.

To rule out whether the association between quality digital tools and educational outcomes simply reflects a bias toward positivity by certain respondents, or household income levels, we conducted additional research to test for those issues. Even when controlling for these factors, the results didn't change. Thus, we have confidence that there is a robust association. Details of this analysis are provided in the appendix.

Overall, these results suggest a strong connection between learning during the pandemic and the quality of digital learning tools. Moreover, there is remarkable agreement on the important relationship between technology and learning across students, parents and teachers. Taken at face value, these results provide compelling motivation to identify the best digital learning tools and make them more widely available. At the very least, doing so would likely raise students' and their supporters' confidence in making learning gains, boost expectations for exceeding standards, and ease the difficulty of learning from home.

Yet, there are several important limitations to this analysis, which point to opportunities for further research to test these findings more rigorously. The survey did not directly measure learning using objective, reliable metrics -- such as performance on standardized tests. However, subjective reports and expectations are often correlated with objective progress, so the positive association between digital learning and actual learning would likely hold using objective measures. Still, test score data would clarify the strength of the relationship and allow for comparisons to other well-studied interventions, like tutoring.

The same measurement limitation applies to the subjective evaluation of digital learning tools. These subjective measures should be considered alongside objective specifications or specific software. In future studies, researchers could ask students, parents and teachers to provide subjective ratings of specific digital tools to study the relationship between the two. Those data could then be used to identify the features of digital technology that predict higher ratings.

Beyond measurement challenges, another important limitation is that the association between technology and learning cannot be confidently interpreted as a causal effect because the quality of digital learning tools is not randomly assigned. More ambitious social science research could randomly assign students to use the highest-rated tools and test the effects on objective learning outcomes.

In the absence of those findings, the results here nonetheless should motivate school administrators to solicit feedback from teachers, parents and students about whether the digital tools they currently use are working for them. Even with most districts providing full-time in-person schooling, the quality of digital learning tools is likely to affect learning outcomes for the foreseeable future.

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Custom graphic. Better student outcomes -- including ease of learning from home, confidence in schools' ability to provide high-quality education, and expectations for learning progress -- are strongly associated with the quality of digital learning tools, as reported by teachers, parents and students.

(Gallup)

FEBRUARY 3, 2022

Source: https://news.gallup.com/opinion/gallup/388502/better-technology-produced-better-learning-outcomes-during-pandemic.aspx

 

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Academic, Emotional Concerns Outweigh COVID-19 Risks In Parents’ Views About Keeping Schools Open, Only A Few (9%) Say School Should Be Fully Online

Amid a surge of COVID-19 cases due to the omicron variant, a narrow majority of parents of K-12 students (53%) say schools in the United States should be providing a mix of in-person and online instruction this winter, according to a new Pew Research Center survey. Some 37% say K-12 schools should be providing in-person instruction only, while just 9% say schools should be fully online.

A bar chart showing that growing shares of K-12 parents say concerns about academics, emotional well-being should be major factors in decisions about keeping schools open

When asked what factors schools should consider in deciding whether to stay open for in-person instruction this winter, most parents of K-12 students say a lot of consideration should be given to the possibility that students will fall behind academically (67%) or that their emotional well-being will be negatively impacted (61%) if they don’t attend school in person. Smaller shares cite parents not being able to work if their children are home (52%), the risk to students or teachers of getting or spreading the coronavirus (43% and 39%, respectively), and the financial cost to school systems of following public health guidelines for safely keeping schools open (26%).

In July 2020, more K-12 parents said health risks to students (64%) and teachers (61%) should be given a lot of consideration in decisions about reopening schools than said the same about the possibility of students falling behind academically without in-person instruction (54%). By February 2021 – when many schools that had been providing online instruction were deciding whether to reopen for in-person instruction – six-in-ten parents said academic considerations should be a major factor, while smaller shares pointed to health risks to teachers (47%) or students (45%).

As has been the case throughout the pandemic, views about how schools should be handling instruction vary widely along party lines. Among parents of K-12 students, Republicans and those who lean Republican (55%) are far more likely than Democrats and Democratic leaners (26%) to say schools should be providing in-person instruction only this winter. A majority of Democratic parents (64%) – compared with 39% of Republican parents – say schools should be providing a mix of in-person and online instruction.

A chart showing that there are wide partisan gaps in whether health risks to students and teachers should be major factors in deciding whether to keep K-12 schools open this winter

Republican parents are more likely than Democratic parents to say a lot of consideration should be given to the possibility that students will fall behind academically or that their emotional well-being will be negatively impacted without in-person instruction. Republicans are also more likely than Democrats to say parents not being able to work if their children are home should be an important factor in these decisions. In turn, larger shares of Democratic than Republican parents say the risk to teachers and students of getting or spreading the coronavirus should be given a lot of consideration.

Views also vary across demographic groups. White parents (47%) are far more likely than non-White parents (25%) to say schools should be providing in-person instruction only this winter, while non-White parents are about three times as likely as White parents to say schools should be fully online (14% vs. 5%, respectively). (The non-White category includes parents who identify as Black, Asian, Hispanic, some other race or multiple races; these groups could not be analyzed separately due to sample size limitations.)

A bar chart showing that K-12 parents’ views about what type of instruction schools should be offering differ along demographic and party lines

Some 46% of upper-income parents and 43% of those with middle incomes say schools should be in-person only, compared with 28% of lower-income parents. Among lower-income parents, 16% say schools should be providing online instruction only; just 7% of those with middle incomes and an even smaller share of upper-income parents (2%) say the same.

These differences reflect, at least in part, the factors parents say should be given a lot of consideration in decisions about whether to keep schools open this winter. Non-White parents are more likely than White parents to say health risks to students (56% vs. 33%, respectively) and teachers (50% vs. 31%) should be major factors. By contrast, White parents (66%) are more likely than non-White parents (54%) to cite concerns that students’ emotional well-being will be negatively impacted if they don’t attend school in person. Similar shares of White (69%) and non-White (65%) parents say academic concerns should be given a lot of consideration.

Lower-income parents are more likely than those with middle or upper incomes to say the risk to students of getting or spreading COVID-19 should be given a lot of consideration in these decisions; those with upper incomes are the most likely to cite concerns about academics and students’ emotional well-being if they don’t attend school in person.

Most parents of K-12 students say their children are getting in-person instruction only

While a majority of parents think K-12 schools should be offering a mix of in-person and online instruction this winter, just 16% say this is the type of instruction their children are currently getting. About seven-in-ten (71%) say their children are getting in-person instruction only, while just 5% say their children are getting only online instruction. In October 2020, a plurality of K-12 parents (46%) said their children were getting online instruction only, while 20% said they were getting only in-person instruction and 23% said there was a mix.

A bar chart showing that most K-12 parents in the U.S. say their children are currently getting in-person instruction only, but experiences vary by family income level

Upper-income parents are the most likely to say their children are getting in-person instruction only: 84% say this in the new survey, compared with 77% of those with middle incomes and an even smaller share of those with lower incomes (58%). About one-in-ten lower-income parents (9%) say their children are getting online instruction only, while 23% say their children are getting a mix of in-person and online instruction. Just 3% of K-12 parents with middle incomes and 2% of those with upper incomes say their children are getting only online instruction, while about one-in-ten in each group say they are getting a mix.

(PEW)

FEBRUARY 4, 2022

Source: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2022/02/04/academic-emotional-concerns-outweigh-covid-19-risks-in-parents-views-about-keeping-schools-open/

 

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Half (52%) Of Canadians Agree Government Should Enact A Tax On Unvaccinated People

With the recent announcement that Quebec will be imposing a health tax on unvaccinated people, who account for a large proportion of COVID-19 hospitalizations, a new Ipsos poll conducted on behalf of Global News reveals that this measure is divisive across the country - half (52%) of Canadians agree (25% strongly/27% somewhat) that the government should enact a tax on unvaccinated people, whereas another half (48%) disagree with this measure. Those aged 55+, who are more likely to have negative health effects from COVID-19, are more likely to be in support of this measure compared to other age groups (58% 55+, 47% 18-34, 50% 35-54).

Regionally, those in Saskatchewan/Manitoba and Quebec are more likely to agree that the government should enact a tax on unvaccinated people (59% SK/MB, 58% Quebec, 53% BC, 52% Atlantic Provinces, 49% Ontario, 44% Alberta).

As restrictions remain in place across the country and elective surgeries continue to be postponed, it is perhaps unsurprising that Canadians want further restrictions specifically for unvaccinated people. A majority (67%) agree (36% strongly/31% somewhat) that government should enact further restrictions on unvaccinated people.

Men (72% vs 62% women), those aged 55+ (77%, 58% 18-34, 64% 35-54), and those with a university education (76% Univ Grad, 69% HS, 53% <HS, 64% Post Sec) are more likely to agree that the government should enact further restrictions on those who are unvaccinated. Regionally, those in Saskatchewan and Manitoba are more likely to agree (77% SK/MB vs. 76% Atlantic Provinces, 67% Quebec, 67% Alberta, 64% BC, 64% Ontario).

If people want to remain unvaccinated, half (51%) of Canadians agree (21% strongly/31% somewhat) that we should provide other ways to accommodate them through testing and other measures. Younger Canadians (59% 18-34, 53% 35-54 vs 44% 55+) and those who have less than a high school education (68% <HS, 53% HS, 47% Post Sec, 44% Univ Grad) are more likely to agree that we should provide other ways to accommodate those who remain unvaccinated. There is no regional difference, meaning that this remains an equally-controversial issues across the country.

To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following:

% Strongly/Somewhat Agree

Statement

January 2022

Government should enact further restrictions on unvaccinated people

67%

We should have lockdowns for as long as it takes to get Omicron under control

52%

Government should enact a tax on unvaccinated people

52%

If some people want to remain unvaccinated, we should provide other ways to accommodate them through testing and other measures

51%

 

One in five (21%) Say They Would End Their Friendship with Someone Who Does Not Share Their Views on Vaccination

Feelings of anger and frustration have grown towards unvaccinated people, and Canadians are expressing these sentiments through personal choices. One in five (21%) say they would end their friendship with someone who does not share their views on vaccination. Men (25% vs 17% women) and younger Canadians (28% 18-34, 17% 35-54, 20% 55+) are more likely to end a friendship due to their vaccination frustration.

As we near year three of the pandemic, half (49%) blame those who are unvaccinated for the pandemic not being over. Men (55% vs 44% women) and those aged 55+ (55% 55+, 44% 18-34, 47% 35-54), and those with a university education (59% Univ Grad, 33% <HS, 49% HS, 49% Post Sec) are more likely to agree.

Canadians appear to be treating those who are vaccinated differently from those who are not – three quarters (73%) say they would welcome a vaccinated person into their home, no questions asked. On the flip side, slightly less than four in ten (36%) would do the same for an unvaccinated person. Slightly more (39%) would welcome in an unvaccinated person into their home if they took a rapid test, but most Canadians remain wary of letting an unvaccinated person into their home.

Those residing in Alberta, Quebec, and the Atlantic provinces are more likely to agree that they would welcome an unvaccinated person into their home, no questions asked, compared to those residing in Ontario (46% Alberta, 44% Quebec, 41% Atlantic, 37% BC, 31% SK/MB, 28% Ontario).

Notably, over a quarter (28%) say they would not allow anyone into their home unless they took a rapid test. Men (32% vs 25% women) and older Canadians (32% 55+, 31% 35-54, 23% 18-34) are more likely to agree with this statement. Regionally, there is no difference.

It has been argued by some that taxing the unvaccinated is a slippery slope – if we tax unvaccinated, why not tax smokers of heavy drinkers, for example. Similar to half (52%) who agree that the government should enact a tax on unvaccinated people, a slim majority (52%) of Canadians also agree that those who are not vaccinated should pay a $100 user fee for each day they are hospitalized due to COVID-19. In fact, more Canadians are in favour of charging unvaccinated Canadians a per-day user fee at the hospital than those who are smokers (37%) and heavy alcohol drinkers (34%).

Once again, men (56% vs 48% women), older Canadians (58% 55+, 54% 35-54 vs 42% 18-34), and those with a university education (61% Univ Grad, 31% <HS, 49% HS, 57% Post Sec) are more likely to agree that those who are not vaccinated should pay a $100 user fee for each day they are hospitalized due to COVID-19.

Most Canadians (89%) say they have voluntarily shared their vaccination status with family, friends, co-workers, or their employer. Older Canadians are more likely to say they shared their vaccination status than younger Canadians (94% 55+ vs 86% 18-34, 86% 35-54).

Thinking about unvaccinated Canadians, to what extent do you agree or disagree with the following:

View on Unvaccinated Individuals

January 2022

I have voluntarily shared my vaccination status with family/friends/co-workers/my employer

89%

I would welcome a vaccinated person into my home, no questions asked

73%

People who are not vaccinated should pay a $100 per day user fee for everyday they are hospitalized due to Covid.

52%

Unvaccinated people are to blame for the pandemic not being over

49%

I would only welcome an unvaccinated person into my home if they took a rapid test

39%

People who are smokers should pay a $100 per day user fee for everyday they are hospitalized due to health conditions arising from smoking.

37%

I would welcome an unvaccinated person into my home, no questions asked

36%

People who are heavy alcohol drinkers should pay a $100 per day user fee for everyday they are hospitalized due to health conditions arising from drinking.

34%

I will not allow anyone into my home unless they take a rapid test

28%

I would end a friendship with someone who does not share my views on vaccination

21%

 

(Ipsos Canada)

24 January 2022

Source: https://www.ipsos.com/en-ca/news-and-polls/half-of-canadians-agree-government-should-enact-a-tax-on-unvaccinated-people

 

AUSTRALIA

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Nearly Two-Thirds Of Australians (65%) Say January 26 Should Be Known As ‘Australia Day’ – Up 6% Points On A Year Ago

Men clearly favour ‘Australia Day’ on January 26, but Women are more evenly split

There is quite a gender difference on the question with men favouring January 26 being known as ‘Australia Day’ rather than ‘Invasion Day’ by a margin of over 2:1 (70% cf. 30%).

In contrast, Australia’s women are more evenly split with a narrow majority of 60% in favour of January 26 being known as ‘Australia Day’ compared to 40% saying it should be known as ‘Invasion Day’.

Support for saying January 26 should be known as ‘Australia Day’ has grown for both genders compared to this time a year ago.

Australians under 35 favour ‘Invasion Day’ while those over 35 favour ‘Australia Day’

The results of this survey are heavily correlated to age with Australians under 25 in favour of January 26 being known as ‘Invasion Day’ by a margin of almost 2:1 (64% ‘Invasion Day’ cf. 36% ‘Australia Day’).

Their slightly older counterparts aged 25-34 are also in favour of the day being known as ‘Invasion Day’ but by a much narrower margin of 54% cf. 46%.

However, people aged 35+ are increasingly likely to say January 26 should be called ‘Australia Day’ rather than ‘Invasion Day’. Almost two-thirds of people aged 35-49 are in favour of ‘Australia Day’ (65% cf.35%) and this margin increases substantially for those aged 50-64 (75% cf. 25%) and 65+ (85% cf. 15%).

Support for saying January 26 should be known as ‘Australia Day’ has grown across all age groups over the last year, increasing by the most for people aged 35-49 (up 11% points to 65%) and increasing the least for people aged 25-34 (up 1% point to 46%) – and still in a minority point of view for that age group.

L-NP & ALP supporters favour ‘Australia Day’ whereas Greens supporters favour ‘Invasion Day’

L-NP supporters favour January 26 being known as ‘Australia Day’ rather than ‘Invasion Day’ by a margin of over three-to-one, 76% cf. 24% - while almost two-thirds of ALP supporters favour ‘Australia Day’ (65%) cf. ‘Invasion Day’ (35%).

In contrast, a majority of Greens supporters are in favour of January 26 being known as ‘Invasion Day’ (56%) rather than ‘Australia Day’ (44%).

Supporters of Independents and Others, including Pauline Hanson’s One Nation, and Clive Palmer’s United Australia Party, are in favour of January 26 being known as ‘Australia Day’ (68%) compared to only 32% that say it should be known as ‘Invasion Day’.

Over 60% of people in all States are in favour of January 26 being known as ‘Australia Day’

Over three-fifths of people in all six States favour January 26 being known as ‘Australia Day’ instead of ‘Invasion Day’. Support for ‘Australia Day’ is strongest in Queensland (68% cf. 32%), New South Wales (67% cf. 33%) and Western Australia (66% cf. 34%).

Support for the date being known as ‘Australia Day’ is slightly lesser in South Australia (64% cf. 36%), Tasmania (62% cf. 38%) and Victoria (62% cf. 38%).

Support for January 26 has increased the most from a year ago in Victoria, up 12% points to 62% and New South Wales, up 10% points to 67%.

In contrast, support for January 26 being known as ‘Australia Day’, has decreased in Western Australia, down 10% points to 66% and Tasmania, down 8% points to 62%.

There is something of a divergence between Australia’s Capital Cities and those in Country Regions on the question. A rising majority of 63% of people in Capital Cities say January 26 should be known as ‘Australia Day’ compared to 37% opting for ‘Invasion Day’. In Country Regions the difference is far starker with over two-thirds (69%) saying the day should be known as ‘Australia Day’ compared to 31% for ‘Invasion Day’.

Michele Levine CEO Roy Morgan, says support for January 26 remaining as ‘Australia Day’ has increased to 65% of Australians (up 6% points from a year ago) in 2022 compared to only 35% (down 6% points) that say the date should be known as ‘Invasion Day’:

“Nearly two-thirds of Australians (65%) have thrown their support behind January 26 being known as ‘Australia Day’ – and support is stronger than a year ago across many key demographics.

“Over two-thirds of men (70%) and three-fifths of women (60%) say January 26 should be known as ‘Australia Day’ – both of which have increased from a year ago. All Australians aged 35+ as well as solid majorities in all six States also prefer ‘Australia Day’ to the alternative of ‘Invasion Day’.

“Supporters of both major political parties also say January 26 should remain as ‘Australia Day’ including 76% of L-NP supporters and 65% of ALP supporters – in line with the national average.

“However, there are significant demographics in which a majority of people would prefer the date was known as ‘Invasion Day’. Most notably these include young people under the age of 35. Almost two-thirds of people aged 18-24 (64%) and a narrow majority of 54% of people aged 25-34 say the date should be known as ‘Invasion Day’.

“This result is replicated for supporters of the Greens – a clear majority of 56% say it should be known as ‘Invasion Day’. Greens supporters were also the most likely to suggest neither name was appropriate for the day with just over one-in-seven (15%) saying a new name was needed.

“When people are asked why they hold these views supporters of the date being known as ‘Australia Day’ say the date is a positive and inclusive day to bring everyone together in celebration of the country, they refer to the date marking the beginning of the story of modern Australia and reject the notion that there was anything resembling an invasion begun on that day.

“For those who say that January 26 should be known as ‘Invasion Day’ they say the date marks the beginning of the invasion of Australia and the oppression, dispossession, abuse and genocide of the indigenous people of this continent. They also point out that the date does not signify the birth of the nation of Australia, but rather the birth of an English penal colony and point out that there are other more unifying dates that should be considered to move away from the divisiveness of this date.”


Australians surveyed were asked about their view of Australia Day:

  • Question 1: “On January 26, 1788, Captain Arthur Phillip landed at Sydney Cove. In your opinion should January 26 be known as Australia Day or Invasion Day?” Australia Day 65% (up 6% points from a year ago) cf. Invasion Day 35% (down 6% points).
  • Question 2: “And why do you say that?”

This special Roy Morgan Snap SMS survey was conducted with an Australia-wide cross-section of 1,372 Australians aged 18+ on the weekend of Friday January 21 – Sunday January 23, 2021. Of those surveyed 4% of respondents suggested neither or something else for the day.

Question 1:
On January 26, 1788, Captain Arthur Phillip landed at Sydney Cove. In your opinion should January 26 be known as Australian Day or Invasion Day?
By Gender & Age

Jan. 25,
2021

Jan. 21-24,
2022

Gender

Age

 

Men

Women

Under 25

25-34

35-49

50-64

65+

 

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

Australia Day

59

65

70

60

36

46

65

75

85

Invasion Day

41

35

30

40

64

54

35

25

15

TOTAL

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

On January 26, 1788, Captain Arthur Phillip landed at Sydney Cove. In your opinion should January 26 be known as Australian Day or Invasion Day?
By States & City/Country

 

Areas

States

 

Australians
18+

Capital
Cities

Country
Regions

NSW

VIC

QLD

WA

SA

TAS

 

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

Australia Day

65

63

69

67

62

68

66

64

62

Invasion Day

35

37

31

33

38

32

34

36

38

TOTAL

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100


 

On January 26, 1788, Captain Arthur Phillip landed at Sydney Cove. In your opinion should January 26 be known as Australian Day or Invasion Day?
By Party Vote (Federal)

 

Electors

Party Vote

 

L-NP

ALP

Greens

Ind./Others

Can’t say

 

%

%

%

%

%

%

Australia Day

67

76

65

44

68

59

Invasion Day

33

24

35

56

32

41

TOTAL

100

100

100

100

100

100


Question 2: And why do you say that?
Respondents who were asked whether they thought January 26 should be known as ‘Australia Day’ or ‘Invasion Day’ were then asked: “And why do you say that?”

Those in support of January 26 being known as ‘Australia Day’ say it is a day for everyone to celebrate the country and bring people together and shouldn’t be known as ‘Invasion Day’

For the 65% of Australians who say January 26 should be known as ‘Australia Day’ the key themes to emerge were that Australia Day is a positive day for everyone to celebrate this country, because it was not an ‘invasion’ but a ‘colonisation’, because it’s the day that marks the beginning of what became known as Australia and because that day has always been celebrated that way and should continue to be.

Many people supporting Australia Day say it’s a positive and inclusive day for everyone to celebrate this country.

  • ‘That day was the start of Australia as we know it now. We survived as a nation through tough times. Australia Day should be an inclusive celebration of the whole nation.’
  • ‘It’s a day of inclusion for all Australians.’
  • ‘Australia Day is for all Australians to celebrate this great country.’
  • ‘Let’s celebrate the positives instead of this ‘Century21 BS’ trying to reinvent bygone times. People in 1788 lived decent lives by their rules.’
  • ‘It’s a day to honour and celebrate all Australians inclusively.’
  • ‘Australia is home to many races and we need a day to remember and celebrate together.’
  • ‘Easy – we are Australian and should be inclusive not separate as some would like it.’
  • ‘No one alive today had anything to do with the invasion and Australia Day is inclusive of all.’
  • ‘Because it needs to be inclusive and adapt to the needs of first nation’s people.’
  • ‘Because I am inclusive, not racist.’
  • ‘It’s a name given to the country, inclusive of its complete history, which should acknowledge all peoples.’
  • ‘It should be a day inclusive of all Australians.’
  • ‘Well, I don’t believe in ‘Invasion Day’ but I would like to see more inclusiveness and reconciliation with Australia Day as well.’
  • ‘Australia Day is a positive thing, ‘Invasion Day’ sounds so negative. Why would we celebrate negativity?’